© 2015, Tariqa Waters, 100 % Kanekalon, photograph, 7’ x 5’ x 1”, from the exhibition 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, Northwest African American Museum June 4 to October 16, 2016, image courtesy of the artist

© 2015, Tariqa Waters, 100% Kanekalon, photograph, 7’ x 5’ x 1”, from the exhibition 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, Northwest African American Museum June 4 to October 16, 2016, image courtesy of the artist.

4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Estate of Su Job are pleased to announce that Tariqa Waters is the 2016 recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000.

The grant was developed by Job just before her passing in December, 2008 and acknowledges King County artists with a connection to Pioneer Square who have “demonstrated a profound ability to challenge the limits of conductive creative discourse and its effects on our society, pushing the creative act beyond the accepted limits, definitions, or purposes of art while engaging audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex.” Su also wanted to recognize artists who “incorporate the creative process into a life practice that diffuses the boundaries between professional activities, social responsibilities, and respect for the people that compose the community we all share.”

Tariqa Waters manages a multi-faceted practice as a visual artist, alternative gallerist, curator and educator. Tariqa was born in Virginia. She taught herself to be a painter, learning from other artists in her family and a period of time working as a muralist in Sicily. She exhibited her paintings in group exhibitions in the Metro D.C. area and in Atlanta where she lived prior to moving to Seattle in 2012.

In just four years, Waters’ has made an indelible mark on Seattle’s arts community and the Pioneer Square neighborhood. The move to the neighborhood also shifted Waters’ practice as her life and work began to merge in unexpected ways. Establishing Martyr Sauce, a “renegade gallery as a platform for generating press and attention for marginalized perspectives” was one of those unanticipated outcomes. Originally located in the stairwell/storefront entry to her live/work loft space, Martyr Sauce is now re-established at 1st Avenue and Jackson Street in what used to be Bud’s Jazz Records.

Tariqa’s own artwork has been garnering support and critical acclaim in the region. She created cover art for The Stranger three times and was herself featured on the cover of City Arts Magazine annual 2015 Future List edition. She has been included in group exhibitions at Vermillion, Washington Hall, the Art of the City Festival, Seattle Public Utilities Cultural Perspective, and Out of Sight.  Her solo exhibition, 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, is currently on view at the Northwest African American Museum through October 16. Tariqa works as a teaching artist at the Seattle Art Museum, where she also presented an interactive installation entitled Not Again as part of the Pop Departures and City Dwellers exhibit.

Please join us in celebrating Tariqa on Thursday, November 3, 6:00—9:00pm at Martyr Sauce in Pioneer Square! Award presentation will happen at 7:00 pm.

About the Conductive Garboil Selection Process
Prior to her death, Su Job chose the inaugural recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, Johnathan Heath Lambe. She also established a group of panelists to select the 2009 recipient, Sheri Brown. Panelists have since nominated their successors, according to Su’s guidelines. Kelly Lyles received the award in 2010, Rio Pacific Studio (Jeff Jacobson & Jen Vertz) in 2011, Paul Rucker in 2012, Christian French in 2013, Jeppa K. Hall in 2014, and Robb Kunz in 2015. The grant is administered on an annual basis by 4Culture and Artist Trust with the assistance of Su Job’s personal representative, Lynn Schirmer. More details may be found at www.garboil.org.