Marsh house window restoration project, Kirkland © 2016, courtesy of Paul Barry

It’s been over a year since we partnered with the King County Council to make a $28 million investment in our region’s cultural infrastructure through our historic Building for Culture grant, and we continue to see its effects throughout the region.  We’ve shared stories from some of the 102 organizations that received funding, but haven’t yet explored another aspect of how these funds are being put to work: preservation of historic landmarks, many of which are privately owned by King County residents who are passionate about preserving the cultural heritage embodied in our built environment.

Marsh house window restoration project, Kirkland © 2016, courtesy of Paul Barry

One such example is the Louis S. Marsh House, built in 1929 by the pioneering aviation engineer Louis Marsh. It recently underwent an extensive restoration of its leaded glass windows and doors. Directly across from City of Kirkland’s Marsh Park, this striking landmark is a prominent feature along Lake Washington Boulevard. Over fifty original, leaded glass windows and doors were repaired, weatherized, and repainted as part of a $75,000 grant through the Building for Culture initiative.

The majority of landmarks within King County are privately owned. Some, like the Marsh House, open their doors to occasional tours or public events, but many are private facilities, where the owners have made major investments in the care and maintenance of places important to our communities. Through our annual grants, 4Culture provides a unique opportunity for private property owners to receive some support for their efforts, and safeguard these important landmarks for future generations.