Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, 2011
© Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, detail, 2011, steel, hydraulics, willow trees (detail). Photo courtesy of King County | Ned Ahrens

In Confluence the artist marks the place where the cleansed (effluent) and untreated (influent) water streams pass by one another. Through the hydraulic action of the "breathing lung", the seeping and rushing of water that fills, flushes and flows dramatically through the sunken pool and the open pipe, the artist conveys the experience of the treatment process. In the green volume of the "Willow Grove", water-loving native willows help visitors to visualize a small fraction of the millions of gallons of water that passes through the system every day. Jann Rosen-Queralt, along with Buster Simpson and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Jann Rosen-Queralt talk about her role as a Planning artist and about Confluence.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #1 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, 2011
© Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, 2011, steel, hydraulics, willow trees (detail). Photo courtesy of 4Culture

In Confluence the artist marks the place where the cleansed (effluent) and untreated (influent) water streams pass by one another. Through the hydraulic action of the "breathing lung", the seeping and rushing of water that fills, flushes and flows dramatically through the sunken pool and the open pipe, the artist conveys the experience of the treatment process. In the green volume of the "Willow Grove", water-loving native willows help visitors to visualize a small fraction of the millions of gallons of water that passes through the system every day. Jann Rosen-Queralt, along with Buster Simpson and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Jann Rosen-Queralt talk about her role as a Planning artist and about Confluence.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #1 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, 2011
© Jann Rosen-Queralt, Confluence, detail, 2011, steel, hydraulics, willow trees (detail). Photo by Benjamin Benschneider

In Confluence the artist marks the place where the cleansed (effluent) and untreated (influent) water streams pass by one another. Through the hydraulic action of the "breathing lung", the seeping and rushing of water that fills, flushes and flows dramatically through the sunken pool and the open pipe, the artist conveys the experience of the treatment process. In the green volume of the "Willow Grove", water-loving native willows help visitors to visualize a small fraction of the millions of gallons of water that passes through the system every day. Jann Rosen-Queralt, along with Buster Simpson and Ellen Sollod, was a planning artist on Brightwater, contributing to the Brightwater Art Plan that served as a guide to all of the artwork in the Treatment System.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Jann Rosen-Queralt talk about her role as a Planning artist and about Confluence.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #1 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Jane Tsong, ...no beginning no end/circle of life/blessed water/blood of life…, 2011
© Jane Tsong, …no beginning no end/circle the earth/blessed water/blood of life…, detail, 2011, stainless steel, audio, King County Public Art Collection

Jane Tsong's artwork is installed in three locations and actively blesses the three elements produced by the plant: water, air, and biosolids (earth). Blessings are activated as each element departs the treatment process and continues its life cycle in the natural world.

…no beginning no end/circle the earth/blessed water/blood of life…water blessing located at the disinfection basin, the final point before the water leaves the plant on its journey to Puget Sound, or as reclaimed water for irrigation purposes.

…air help us bless with each breath all creatures of land, sea and air… air blessing located at the odor control building, revealing the invisible current of odorless air leaving the stacks.

Blessings for the Biosolids… located in the Solids Building hopper bay where trucks are loaded with biosolids for their journey to the wheat fields of the plateau.

Download a PDF of the Blessings for the Biosolids by Judith Roche.

The biosolids and water blessings were written by poet Judith Roche. The blessing for the air was written by the artist.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Jane Tsong talk about her artwork for the Treatment zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #2 & #4 & #6 for these artworks when prompted.

Audio for all three Blessings may be found in the Listen Library.

Jane Tsong, ...no beginning no end/circle of life/blessed water/blood of life…, 2011
© Jane Tsong, …air help us bless with each breath all creatures of land, sea and air…, detail, 2012, stainless steel, King County Public Art Collection

Jane Tsong's artwork is installed in three locations and actively blesses the three elements produced by the plant: water, air, and biosolids (earth). Blessings are activated as each element departs the treatment process and continues its life cycle in the natural world.

…no beginning no end/circle the earth/blessed water/blood of life…water blessing located at the disinfection basin, the final point before the water leaves the plant on its journey to Puget Sound, or as reclaimed water for irrigation purposes.

…air help us bless with each breath all creatures of land, sea and air… air blessing located at the odor control building, revealing the invisible current of odorless air leaving the stacks.

Blessings for the Biosolids… located in the Solids Building hopper bay where trucks are loaded with biosolids for their journey to the wheat fields of the plateau.

Download a PDF of the Blessings for the Biosolids by Judith Roche.

The biosolids and water blessings were written by poet Judith Roche. The blessing for the air was written by the artist.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Jane Tsong talk about her artwork for the Treatment zone.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #2 & #4 & #6 for these artworks when prompted.

Audio for all three Blessings may be found in the Listen Library.

Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011
© Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011, stainless steel, ceramic tile, magnets. Photo by Mithun, Juan Hernandez

This artwork gives you a choice: do you take the golden tile dispensed by the giant faucet as a souvenir of your visit to Brightwater, or do you place it on the wall? There is no right or wrong answer, simply a choice. Like the choices we make about managing water resources, each individual action has an impact on the final outcome. When all the tiles have been dispensed those placed on the wall will be recycled back into the system.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Janet Zweig talk about Limited Edition.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #3 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011
© Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011, stainless steel, ceramic tile, magnets. Photo by Mithun, Juan Hernandez

This artwork gives you a choice: do you take the golden tile dispensed by the giant faucet as a souvenir of your visit to Brightwater, or do you place it on the wall? There is no right or wrong answer, simply a choice. Like the choices we make about managing water resources, each individual action has an impact on the final outcome. When all the tiles have been dispensed those placed on the wall will be recycled back into the system.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Janet Zweig talk about Limited Edition.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #3 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011
© Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, detail, 2011, stainless steel, ceramic tile, magnets, King County Public Art Collection

This artwork gives you a choice: do you take the golden tile dispensed by the giant faucet as a souvenir of your visit to Brightwater, or do you place it on the wall? There is no right or wrong answer, simply a choice. Like the choices we make about managing water resources, each individual action has an impact on the final outcome. When all the tiles have been dispensed those placed on the wall will be recycled back into the system.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Janet Zweig talk about Limited Edition.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #3 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011
© Janet Zweig, Limited Edition, 2011, stainless steel, ceramic tile, magnets. Photo by Mithun, Juan Hernandez

This artwork gives you a choice: do you take the golden tile dispensed by the giant faucet as a souvenir of your visit to Brightwater, or do you place it on the wall? There is no right or wrong answer, simply a choice. Like the choices we make about managing water resources, each individual action has an impact on the final outcome. When all the tiles have been dispensed those placed on the wall will be recycled back into the system.

Visit the artist's website

Listen to Janet Zweig talk about Limited Edition.

 

Listen 4Culture

You can also access Listen 4Culture, our free audio cell phone tour by calling 206 296.4848. Choose Public Art and enter #3 for this artwork when prompted.

The collected Brightwater audio may be accessed in our Listen Library in Threads.

Collection: Brightwater Treatment Plant Woodinville, WA

Completed in 2011 and serving King and Snohomish Counties, this significant wastewater infrastructure protects water quality and habitat in the region and features an ambitious collection of public artwork.