Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, documentation of the glass harvesting at Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, WA.

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, documentation of the glass harvesting at Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, WA.

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013, Stainless steel, painted mild steel, re-purposed glass. Photo by YaM Brand

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013, Stainless steel, painted mild steel, re-purposed glass. Photo by YaM Brand

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013, Stainless steel, painted mild steel, re-purposed glass (detail). Photo by YaM Brand

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013
© Cao | Perrot Studio, Confetti Cloud, 2013, Stainless steel, painted mild steel, re-purposed glass (detail). Photo by YaM Brand

Just like real clouds, the sculpture changes dramatically in different light, weather conditions and seasons. The mercurial nature of the artwork comes from its light reflecting and unusual materials: stainless steel mesh and re-purposed colored glass. Confetti Cloud features a very special kind of recycled glass. As part of a residency at the Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Washington, artist Andy Cao discovered a private "landfill" comprised of thousands of tons of fragments accumulated over 40 years at the international center for contemporary art glass. The artists harvested glass from this unique resource for re-use in the sculpture. The recycled glass, caught up in billowing swirls of stainless steel mesh, provides a dash of sparkle and color and reminds the artists of confetti blowing in the breeze. The cloud capsule also uniquely reveals an aspect of Northwest art history.

Visit the artist's website.

Collection: Bow Lake Transfer Station Tukwila, WA

Cao | Perrot Studio's extraordinary objects and environments encourage viewers to see limitless possibilities in humble, re-purposed materials.