Guest Post: “The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop” Hits a National Stage

Jazmyn Scott and Aaron Walker-Loud accept the American Association for State & Local History 2016 Leadership in History Award of Merit for The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. Photo courtesy of MOHAI.

Jazmyn Scott and Aaron Walker-Loud partnered with the Museum of History & Industry to curate and present The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop, an exhibit celebrating the people, places, and events that make up one of our region’s most vibrant cultural communities. The exhibit ran from September 19, 2015 through May 1, 2016. We at 4Culture were proud to help fund it! Here, Aaron and Jazmyn give us some insight into how the exhibit evolved, and where it’s taken them:

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Photo courtesy of MOHAI.
Jazmyn Scott and Aaron Walker-Loud accept the American Association for State & Local History 2016 Leadership in History Award of Merit for The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop. Photo courtesy of MOHAI.

Jazmyn Scott and Aaron Walker-Loud partnered with the Museum of History & Industry to curate and present The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop, an exhibit celebrating the people, places, and events that make up one of our region’s most vibrant cultural communities. The exhibit ran from September 19, 2015 through May 1, 2016. We at 4Culture were proud to help fund it! Here, Aaron and Jazmyn give us some insight into how the exhibit evolved, and where it’s taken them:

After six years of constructing a brighter light to help the world better understand the Hip-Hop scene in Seattle, both past and present, we found ourselves in Detroit receiving national acclaim for these efforts. On the evening of September 16, 2016, we were overjoyed to receive, along with MOHAI, the American Association for State & Local History 2016 Leadership in History Award of Merit for The Legacy of Seattle Hip-Hop exhibit: “the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history.” To think that two people who have never curated an exhibit before could partner, receive great acclaim and public engagement—approximately 31,000 guests attended the exhibit throughout the run—then also receive national accolades, was beyond what we’d ever imagined.

To think that two people who have never curated an exhibit before could partner, receive great acclaim and public engagement—approximately 31,000 guests attended the exhibit throughout the run—then also receive national accolades, was beyond what we’d ever imagined.

In 2010 we were involved in an exciting project with Steve Sneed of the Seattle Center for the 50th anniversary of the Seattle World’s Fair, in the multi-faceted “Next 50” project. Originally approaching Aaron to look at the possibility of producing a Seattle Hip-Hop compilation album, Steve was quickly open to expanding the concept. We built a team that included the two of us, brother Avi Loud, and several community collaborators and created 50 Next: Seattle Hip-Hop Worldwide, which launched in 2012. The project includes a free compilation of 76 Seattle/Northwest Hip-Hop tracks spanning from the early 1980s through 2012, as well as a short film documentary on this region’s unique culture.

To grow the long-term scope of our work, Steve then immediately introduced us to the Black Heritage Society of Washington State, who then introduced us to MOHAI to produce a Black History Month Celebration in February 2014. Showcasing film, visual art, dance, music, and a community conversation about gentrification in Seattle, over 700 guests were in attendance. We were later invited to meet with MOHAI, and presented with the opportunity to co-curate an entire exhibit about Seattle Hip-Hop. After our initial shock at the invitation, we eagerly accepted!

Collecting artifact loans that represent over 1,000 Seattle Hip-Hop artists, along with vital support from Blend, Dr. Daudi Abe, DeVon Manier, Margo Jones, 206 Zulu, the Coolout Network, as well as our teams at 50 Next: Seattle Hip-Hop Worldwide, The Town Entertainment and Big World Breaks, we embarked on our journey. Tasked with engaging the spectrum of museum goers, from toddler aged youth through elders, enlightening those new to Hip-Hop as well as “Hip-Hop Heads,” honoring cultural originators in parallel with new artists, composing the supportive text, having the patient persistence to build trust and collect loaned artifacts from artists spread all over the region—these were the challenges to embrace.

Hip-Hop is ever-evolving. Originating as a Black American art form in New York City in the late 1970s, it is unique among all other music genres as a multi-medium cultural force that is directly tied to the roots of the Black Power movement of the 1960s and still consistent with the ongoing fight against institutional racism through the efforts of Black Lives Matter and many more active entities. To have activists and artists participate in events that brought honest conversation around these vital issues was extremely important to us. We were grateful that MOHAI not only supported us in creatively exploring elements of Hip-Hop within the exhibit—Graffiti, Deejaying, Dance, Emceeing, Production and Fashion—but also co-produced over 20 events with us during the exhibit run, that included the participation of over 45 community members and organizations represented.

Sharing Seattle’s stories in Detroit this September at the AASLH award ceremony, all we could help feel is that this is just the beginning, a surprisingly explosive start to both of our life’s work in amplifying Northwest culture on the world stage.

Guest Post: Northwest Seaport Expands

Photo courtesy of Northwest Seaport.

Nathaniel Howe is the Executive Director of Northwest Seaport, an organization dedicated to preserving the rich maritime heritage of the Pacific Northwest. Their floating fleet at Lake Union Park just received a new addition:

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Photo courtesy of Northwest Seaport.
Photo courtesy of Northwest Seaport.

Nathaniel Howe is the Executive Director of Northwest Seaport, an organization dedicated to preserving the rich maritime heritage of the Pacific Northwest. Their floating fleet at Lake Union Park just received a new addition:

I am very proud to announce that we are expanding our historic fleet, which presently includes the tugboat Arthur Foss of 1889 and Lightship No. 83 Swiftsure of 1904. We have now raised the funds to acquire a “new” 105 year-old vessel, the 75-ft. halibut schooner Tordenskjold (pronounced tore-den-sk-yool-d). After more than 100 years of commercial fishing, this true Northwest icon is about to become Seattle’s newest museum ship.

Built in Ballard by John Strand in 1911, Tordenskjold is now one of the oldest halibut schooners left. In its century of fishing it has worked up and down the West Coast catching not only halibut, but also crab, shrimp, tuna, and even sharks—a catch highly valued by the US armed forces during WWII. Fishing with dories, long-lines, pelagic trawl nets, and bottom trawls, Tordenskjold worked in more fisheries than any other halibut schooner and is believed to have the rare distinction of being the only boat in the fleet to have never lost a man at sea.

Drawing of Tordenskjold courtesy of Northwest Seaport.
Drawing of Tordenskjold courtesy of Northwest Seaport.

After the 2012 fishing season, Tordenskjold’s owner, Marvin Gjerde, decided it was time to retire from fishing. The boat still had a lot of years left in her, but with bigger, more powerful longliners on the market, finding a buyer who wanted to invest the time, cash, and energy needed to keep a vessel like Tordenskjold in prime fishing condition was hard to find. Gjerde felt that Northwest Seaport would give Tordenskjold the care and devotion it needs and deserves—just as he has for the past 38 years.

As an operational museum ship, Tordenskjold will become a living education platform, carrying school children and tour groups on short excursions along our city’s one-of-a-kind working waterfront, visiting Fishermen’s Terminal, the locks, and teaching about the innovation and sustainable practices that enable these amazing 100 year-old vessels—designed and built here in Puget Sound—to keep on fishing for over a century. When I was seven years old, I had that very same privilege aboard the halibut schooner Masonic. To this day, I have never forgotten that excursion aboard a true Northwest fishing vessel and I am very excited that we will soon be offering the chance to hundreds of others each year.

The first in-depth survey of Tordenskjold, funded by 4Culture and conducted by Ocean Bay Marine last month, found this boat to be in astoundingly good shape. Gjerde took excellent care of the boat during his tenure.

In the coming weeks, the boat will be drydocked for a detailed survey of the hull and for taking measurements to generate a set of plans (none exist). Volunteer work parties have already begun to clean the boat and prepare her for painting. Anyone who wants to come get to know this amazing vessel and the interesting mix of shipwrights, fishermen, and volunteers working on her now are welcome to come on down!

2016 Conductive Garboil Grant Awarded to Tariqa Waters

© 2015, Tariqa Waters, 100% Kanekalon, photograph, 7’ x 5’ x 1”, from the exhibition 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, Northwest African American Museum June 4 to October 16, 2016, image courtesy of the artist.

4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Estate of Su Job are pleased to announce that Tariqa Waters is the 2016 recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000.

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© 2015, Tariqa Waters, 100 % Kanekalon, photograph, 7’ x 5’ x 1”, from the exhibition 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, Northwest African American Museum June 4 to October 16, 2016, image courtesy of the artist
© 2015, Tariqa Waters, 100% Kanekalon, photograph, 7’ x 5’ x 1”, from the exhibition 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, Northwest African American Museum June 4 to October 16, 2016, image courtesy of the artist.

4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Estate of Su Job are pleased to announce that Tariqa Waters is the 2016 recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000.

The grant was developed by Job just before her passing in December, 2008 and acknowledges King County artists with a connection to Pioneer Square who have “demonstrated a profound ability to challenge the limits of conductive creative discourse and its effects on our society, pushing the creative act beyond the accepted limits, definitions, or purposes of art while engaging audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex.” Su also wanted to recognize artists who “incorporate the creative process into a life practice that diffuses the boundaries between professional activities, social responsibilities, and respect for the people that compose the community we all share.”

Tariqa Waters manages a multi-faceted practice as a visual artist, alternative gallerist, curator and educator. Tariqa was born in Virginia. She taught herself to be a painter, learning from other artists in her family and a period of time working as a muralist in Sicily. She exhibited her paintings in group exhibitions in the Metro D.C. area and in Atlanta where she lived prior to moving to Seattle in 2012.

In just four years, Waters’ has made an indelible mark on Seattle’s arts community and the Pioneer Square neighborhood. The move to the neighborhood also shifted Waters’ practice as her life and work began to merge in unexpected ways. Establishing Martyr Sauce, a “renegade gallery as a platform for generating press and attention for marginalized perspectives” was one of those unanticipated outcomes. Originally located in the stairwell/storefront entry to her live/work loft space, Martyr Sauce is now re-established at 1st Avenue and Jackson Street in what used to be Bud’s Jazz Records.

Tariqa’s own artwork has been garnering support and critical acclaim in the region. She created cover art for The Stranger three times and was herself featured on the cover of City Arts Magazine annual 2015 Future List edition. She has been included in group exhibitions at Vermillion, Washington Hall, the Art of the City Festival, Seattle Public Utilities Cultural Perspective, and Out of Sight.  Her solo exhibition, 100% Kanekalon: The Untold Story of the Marginalized Matriarch, is currently on view at the Northwest African American Museum through October 16. Tariqa works as a teaching artist at the Seattle Art Museum, where she also presented an interactive installation entitled Not Again as part of the Pop Departures and City Dwellers exhibit.

Please join us in celebrating Tariqa on Thursday, November 3, 6:00—9:00pm at Martyr Sauce in Pioneer Square! Award presentation will happen at 7:00 pm.

About the Conductive Garboil Selection Process
Prior to her death, Su Job chose the inaugural recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, Johnathan Heath Lambe. She also established a group of panelists to select the 2009 recipient, Sheri Brown. Panelists have since nominated their successors, according to Su’s guidelines. Kelly Lyles received the award in 2010, Rio Pacific Studio (Jeff Jacobson & Jen Vertz) in 2011, Paul Rucker in 2012, Christian French in 2013, Jeppa K. Hall in 2014, and Robb Kunz in 2015. The grant is administered on an annual basis by 4Culture and Artist Trust with the assistance of Su Job’s personal representative, Lynn Schirmer. More details may be found at www.garboil.org.

From Our Executive Director: Looking Ahead to CAWA

Summer camps at MOHAI © 2015, photo by Kathleen Knies, courtesy of MOHAI.

As fall begins, we focus on the coming November elections which will include contests for federal offices, as well as several important local ballot initiatives.

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Summer camps at MOHAI © 2015, photo by Kathleen Knies, courtesy of MOHAI.
Summer camps at MOHAI © 2015, photo by Kathleen Knies, courtesy of MOHAI.

As fall begins, we focus on the coming November elections which will include contests for federal offices, as well as several important local ballot initiatives.

Since 1965, when the National Endowment for the Arts was authorized by the United States Congress, government has been a partner in funding the arts nationally and locally. The King County Arts Commission—the first incarnation of what is now 4Culture—was established in 1967. In the years following, government support was extended to libraries, history museums, historic preservation, and public broadcasting in recognition that those connections to each other and to place create public benefits that help make a cohesive and civil society.

Times have changed, along with attitudes about government and taxes. It is more difficult today to define something as inexact as “the common good.” I live in Seattle and love the idea of expanding transit options. Would I feel the same if I lived in Enumclaw? Today we ask voters to decide what they are willing to support with tax revenues. In some cases, voters are asked to renew a tax for a particular purpose, such as the parks levy from two years ago. In other cases, new taxes are proposed to accomplish regional goals, such as the expansion of Sound Transit’s Light Rail system, which will be on the ballot this November.

In summer 2015, Cultural Access Washington (CAWA), passed the state legislature. The bill allows any county in the state to offer a ballot measure to increase access to science and cultural non-profit organizations by increasing sales tax. We began to ask: how would arts and culture fare if put to the voters? Now that the bill will—in all likelihood—appear on the King County ballot in 2017, we are partnering with cultural organizations and advocates from across our region to dig deeper.

Throughout the summer we convened study groups to review CAWA legislation and what it could look like in practice, and we heard and asked a myriad of critical questions: how do we define “access”? How do we embed equity into the structure of this bill? How do we create educational opportunities that truly make a difference to our citizens?

While we wrestle with complex issues in this year’s election, we invite you to join us in also looking ahead to 2017 and CAWA. These questions are just the first in a conversation we will continue over the next year as we craft the best possible funding program for arts, science, and culture in King County. Stay tuned.

Jim Kelly

Guest Post: Celebrating Filipino-American Elders

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Penaloza Quote

Michelle Peñaloza is the author of two chapbooks, and has had her poetry and essays featured in several publications. She received a 2015 Art Projects grant supporting her work on a collection of in-progress poetry. This Friday, she’ll read from her manuscript alongside other Filipino-American writiers at a location that deepens and enriches our understanding of her work: 

Arroz caldo for lunch. Blaring speakers and a dance floor full of women and men moving in the delightful unison of complex and funky line dances. Their smiling faces remind me of my lola, my parents, my titos and titas. Here, there is a room for bingo, a room for praying the rosary, a room for checkers, a room for pinoy teleserye.

This is the magic of the International Drop-In Center (IDIC), a community-based senior center in the heart of Beacon Hill that primarily serves Filipino and Filipino-American elders. The IDIC is a warm gathering place for senior citizens, retirees, widows, first-generation immigrants, and war veterans. The sense of community here is palpable upon entering. When I first visited, I went back in time to the many parties I attended as a child—laughter, food, song, dance, chatter all happening simultaneously in every room.

So, what does the IDIC have to do with my project? With what I care about as an artist? With my poetry?

My full-length manuscript-in-progress, Former Possessions of the Spanish Empire, is steeped in storytelling, in processing and interrogating the legacies of colonialism, and in honoring, questioning, and remembering family. While the elders at the IDIC are not my blood family, the warmth with which they welcomed me felt like family. I wanted this event to highlight the rich legacies of the Filipino-American community in Seattle and bring attention and homage to the elders of our community. I’m proud to be doing this event with other Seattle-based, Filipino-American writers; we will host story-telling workshops groups, perform our own work, and join in celebration for an open mic and karaoke with our elders. Yes! Karaoke! I hope you’ll join us. It’s going to be a delightful time.

Event details:
Celebrating Filipino-American Elders: Reading and Karaoke
October 7, 1:30—4:00pm
International Drop-In Center
Seattle-based, Filipino-American poets and writers Maria Batayola, Robert Flor, Donna Miscolta, Michelle Peñaloza, Jen Soriano, and Maritess Zurbano will lead Filipino American elders, at the International Drop-In Center in Beacon Hill, in a story-telling workshop, which culminate in writers, elders, and visitors participating in an open mic reading, sharing their stories and participating in a karaoke-singing session. Free to attend.

This event is made possible through support from 4Culture, Poets & Writers, the International Drop-In Center (IDIC), the Filipino American National Historical Society – Greater Seattle Chapter, and Kundiman.

Historic Hansen Building Gets Seismic Retrofit

The Hansen Building pictured in 2012, photo courtesy of the Lohrers.

After announcing and awarding an unprecedented $28 million investment in King County’s cultural infrastructure last year, we’re excited to see funded projects underway all over the county. Saving Landmarks was a portion of Building for Culture funds specifically dedicated to preserving our region’s invaluable built environment, and last month we saw it in action in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. The historic Hansen Building is currently undergoing a seismic retrofit, thanks, in part, to this program.

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The Hansen Building pictured in 2012, photo courtesy of the Lohrers.

After announcing and awarding an unprecedented $28 million investment in King County’s cultural infrastructure last year, we’re excited to see funded projects underway all over the county. Saving Landmarks was a portion of Building for Culture funds specifically dedicated to preserving our region’s invaluable built environment, and last month we saw it in action in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood. The historic Hansen Building is currently undergoing a seismic retrofit, thanks, in part, to this program.

Built in 1905, the Hansen Building was nominated to the U.S. Department of the Interior National Register in 1976, as a contributing building in the Ballard Avenue Landmark District. Located in old Ballard, on the corner of Ballard Avenue and NW Dock Place, the Hansen Building is privately owned by Roger and Laurie Lohrer, and leased to commercial tenants.

As stewards of the site for the last 18 years, the Lohrers are dedicated to preserving the building and the sense of permanence it brings the community. “Our goal is to preserve its historic character, distinctive features and period-typical craftsmanship” said Laurie Lohrer. “We value our role to preserve this architectural gem. We decided in invest in the voluntary seismic retrofit, as the best, long term way to protect the building, passersby and our tenants. Our thanks goes out to 4Culture and King County for grant funding, to our tenants for their patience and cooperation, our terrific project team—Marpac Construction, SMR Architects and IL Gross Structural Engineers—to the City of Seattle DCI, SDOT, Ballard Avenue Landmark District Board, and Puget Sound Energy, who all helped make our retrofit possible.”

Dock Street Properties LLC PR-16-0795 Hansen 05 Roof Demo for Seismic Ties 092116
Roof demo for seismic ties, September 2016, photo courtesy of Dock Street Properties LLC.

October at Gallery4Culture: Brit Ruggirello

Brit Ruggirello. Blue Hotel, Series 1, Episode 1, 2016. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, gradient rug, chair, mannequin, fake flowers, mini lava lamp, ribbon, balloons, and balloon weight.

Brit Ruggirello
Blue Hotel
September 6—27, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, October 6, 6:00—8:00 pm
Blue Hotel Series 2, Episode 1 with performances by Cake “Alchemy!” and Up North

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Brit Ruggirello. Blue Hotel, Series 1, Episode 1, 2016. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, gradient rug, chair, mannequin, fake flowers, mini lava lamp, ribbon, balloons, and balloon weight.
Brit Ruggirello. Blue Hotel, Series 1, Episode 1, 2016. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, gradient rug, chair, mannequin, fake flowers, mini lava lamp, ribbon, balloons, and balloon weight.

Brit Ruggirello
Blue Hotel
September 6—27, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, October 6, 6:00—8:00 pm
Blue Hotel Series 2, Episode 1 with performances by Cake “Alchemy!” and Up North

Brit Ruggirello is interested in interpersonal relationships, digital representation, party aesthetics, and the interior design of Las Vegas hotels. Her installations, or Mood Boards, commemorate the everyday—objects, events, people, and animals—employing human scale assemblage and collage as well as photographic documentation that reinforces the physicality of the work.

Ruggirello lives in a house she calls Blue Hotel. Her exhibition of the same name references the personalities of this unique environment, negotiating between the imagined and the real, with found objects, vibrantly colored light bulbs, pastel gradients, and digitally altered images.

She writes:

“About a year ago, I moved into a blue house. I ended up naming it Blue Hotel.

The name stems from things my then roommate, Dani and I like. She loves the color blue and I love hotels, especially Vegas ones. We read the same book, Hotel Theory and would leave it on the table when people came over. It’s also our WIFI password.

Anyways, a lot of things happened there:
Dani got a dog named Boone.
I started a band called Up North.
I tried to make the space feel homey by adding an eclectic mix of found items and three chairs that cost a total of $11.
I threw a house party series called Blue Hotel. It was a combination of music, art, and friends coming together in a safe place. Ideas could be tried out with no judgment and celebrated among good people!
What I didn’t know at the time was…

It was going to be the theme of my second set of Mood Boards, a series I began as an undergrad when I was being tested to see if I was bi-polar. While this was happening, I had to keep daily mood charts. This practice developed into the creation of mood boards. I would find images on the web, based on the mood I was in, and it got me thinking about representation online and then just representation in general.

I thought about how the people in my life influenced me, and how I would represent them through objects, color, and composition. This lead to the creation of installations within controlled environments. I then photographed them and posted them on the web.”

About the Artist: Brit Ruggirello received her BFA from the University of Washington and currently lives and works in Seattle. She collaborates with Jueqian Fang as artist duo Mystical Orchid and David Nielsen in the experimental band Up North. She has exhibited her work locally and internationally, in such venues as Gallery 295, Vancouver, BC; Whatcom Museum, Bellingham, WA; Veronica, Seattle, WA; and GLASSBOX, Seattle, WA.

Website: britruggirello.com

Chieko Phillips Joins Heritage Team

Photo by Robert Wade.

September brings a new season, new projects, new deadlines, and a new face at 4Culture! Please join us in welcoming Chieko Phillips as our Heritage Support Specialist.

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chieko
Photo by Robert Wade.

September brings a new season, new projects, new deadlines, and a new face at 4Culture! Please join us in welcoming Chieko Phillips as our Heritage Support Specialist.

Chieko is a self-described “history nerd,” and she has an impressive background to back it up. Most recently, she served as Executive Director at BlackPast.org, an incredibly rich online resource for exploring the history of people of African ancestry around the world, and as the Public Program Curator at the Photographic Center NW. She has also worked at the Northwest African American Museum, the United Negro College Fund, and received her Master’s Degree in Museology from the University of Washington. She’s headed up or worked on dozens of heritage projects around the region, and we can’t wait to see what she’ll do next.

Now that Chieko has arrived, our Heritage team—Brian J. Carter joined us in March as our Heritage Lead—is poised to make some exciting things happen in King County! Stay tuned to see what they come up with in the coming months.

Sustained Support Open, with New Opportunities for Cities

Students participate in Seattle Architectural Foundation’s City Stories program. SAF received Preservation Sustained Support funding for the 2015-16 cycle. © 2015, photo by Caroline Nye Stevens, courtesy of Seattle Architectural Foundation.

Where would King County be without our amazing cultural organizations? Large and small, urban and rural, they bring our region’s history to life, connect us with amazing art, safeguard the buildings and locations that define us, and so much more. Through our Sustained Support grant, we assist with the day-to-day needs of these organizations over two-year cycles. It’s available for nonprofit organizations, artistic agencies, and cities supporting cultural activities—see more information on that below—and is open now!

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Students participate in Seattle Architectural Foundation's City Stories program. SAF received Preservation Sustained Support funding in the 2015-16 cycle. © 2015, photo by Caroline Nye Stevens, courtesy of Seattle Architectural Foundation
Students participate in Seattle Architectural Foundation’s City Stories program. SAF received Preservation Sustained Support funding for the 2015-16 cycle. © 2015, photo by Caroline Nye Stevens, courtesy of Seattle Architectural Foundation.

Where would King County be without our amazing cultural organizations? Large and small, urban and rural, they bring our region’s history to life, connect us with amazing art, safeguard the buildings and locations that define us, and so much more. Through our Sustained Support grant, we assist with the day-to-day needs of these organizations over two-year cycles. It’s available for nonprofit organizations, artistic agencies, and cities supporting cultural activities—see more information on that below—and is open now!

Read the full guidelines carefully, and apply by October 19, 2016 at 5:00 pm.

This year, we want to make sure the public knows that Preservation Sustained Support not only provides grants to nonprofit organizations, but also to cities that are contributing to historic preservation. With Sustained Support grants cities can receive operating funds for everyday costs such as salaries, consultant fees, marketing materials, and supplies for two consecutive years. This program is open to all cities in King County with:

  • A historic preservation program established by city ordinance, or historic preservation services contracted through interlocal agreement to the King County Historic Preservation Program (KCHPP).
  • City staff dedicated part or full time to historic preservation tasks, including but not limited to overseeing historic surveys, landmark designations, design review, and public education.

If you live in Auburn, Newcastle, Issaquah or any of the other 17 cities that are eligible to apply, and wish your city could do more in the way of preservation, contact your city manager or local elected officials and let them know about this opportunity! If you have questions about application requirements or eligibility, know that staff is here to help.

Workshops
Bring your questions to these informal, drop-in grant workshops. Program managers will be available to talk about the grant and your application. No need to RSVP!

4Culture Offices
Arts: Mondays, September 12 and 26, October 3, 10, and 17, 12:00-1:00 pm
Heritage: Wednesdays, September 21 and October 12, 3:00-4:00 pm  October 12, 12:00-1:00 pm
Preservation: Tuesdays, September 20 and October 4, 12:00-1:00 pm

Around King County
Wednesday, September 7, 12:00-1:00 pm, Woodinville Library
Wednesday, September 14, 12:00-1:00 pm, Federal Way Community Center
Wednesday, September 28, 12:00-1:00 pm, Issaquah Depot Museum

Leo Berk Selected for New Colman Dock Terminal

Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.

As King County grows, transit is growing with it—on land and on the water. Water Taxis, managed by the King County Department of Transportation Marine Division, currently depart from downtown Seattle’s Pier 50 and head to the Vashon Island Ferry Terminal and West Seattle’s Seacrest dock. In response to a 9.5% increase in ridership between 2014 and 2015 and expected continued growth, a new multimodal terminal is being designed as part of the larger Washington State Ferries Colman Dock preservation project.

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Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, Polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.
Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.

As King County grows, transit is growing with it—on land and on the water. Water Taxis, managed by the King County Department of Transportation Marine Division, currently depart from downtown Seattle’s Pier 50 and head to the Vashon Island Ferry Terminal and West Seattle’s Seacrest dock. In response to a 9.5% increase in ridership between 2014 and 2015 and expected continued growth, a new multimodal terminal is being designed as part of the larger Washington State Ferries Colman Dock preservation project.

We’re excited that public art will be an essential component of this project, and we are pleased to announce that Leo Berk has been selected to provide permanent work of art for the new Water Taxi terminal! Artwork will serve as a welcoming gateway, a visual indication that a uniquely Northwest journey and experience is about to begin, whether passengers are departing or arriving.

Leo is no stranger to creating art for transit. If you’ve travelled through the new LINK light rail station at the University of Washington, which opened in March of this year, you’ve encountered his immersive and dazzling piece, Subterranium. Over the course of the selection process, Leo discussed the transition from land to water and back again that happens when travelling on the Water Taxi, and his personal connection with that experience, sharing, “As an avid cyclist living in Seattle, one of my favorite local bike trips is to take the ferry to Vashon to ride its bucolic roads. There is an undeniably transformative feeling—a shift in psyche—when the ship leaves the terminal and is free from land. Once the ferry arrives at its destination, there is the comforting feeling of being connected to land again, with the distinct difference that the journey has refreshed and rebooted my body and mind.”

We can’t wait to see how Leo will bring this feeling to life at the King County Seattle Ferry Terminal at Colman Dock, and how travelers will get to experience it! Design is set to be completed early next year. Stay connected with us to see how the project unfolds.

September at Gallery4Culture: Sylwia Tur

Sylwia Tur. C-channels (1 inch), 2016. Porcelain. 22 x 18 x 1 inches. Photo by the artist.

Sylwia Tur
Image Space
September 1–29, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, September 1, 6:00–8:00 pm

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Sylwia Tur. C-channels (1 inch), 2016. Porcelain. 22 x 18 x 1 inches. Photo by of the artist.  
Sylwia Tur. C-channels (1 inch), 2016. Porcelain. 22 x 18 x 1 inches. Photo by the artist.

Sylwia Tur
Image Space
September 1–29, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, September 1, 6:00–8:00 pm

Sylwia Tur’s interests lie in a variety of systems: language, architecture and design, distilled to their basic components of organization, grid, proportion and reduction.

Her new body of work, Image Space, is about the language of structures, space and movement, where she is exploring the continuum between the architecture of language and language of architecture.

When observing the world, we create invisible movements in space, looking for patterns and connections, making sense out of what we see. Tur thinks of these movements as gestures or vectors and is interested in how we form our own visual and semantic paradigms. By juxtaposing architectural objects, she intends to generate a perceptual awareness of space, access memory and create new spatial relationships.

Tur states, “In my creative process, I tend to avoid that which already has a solid representation in the world. Instead, I focus on ideas and mechanisms, extrapolating them into the objects I make. They come in the form of gestures and fragments of seemingly disjointed processes, and I task myself with finding their patterns and rules. I use analogies similar to the processes that come together to form language. Thinking of language as a system keeps pointing me in the direction of exploring the landscape of systems present around us. I see architecture as a system of processes and treat its organized and multi-dependent nature as a canvas for my work, a starting point. It is on that canvas that I build my linguistic systems.”

About the Artist: Sylwia Tur is a sculptor and installation artist who works primarily in porcelain. Born and raised in Poland, she received her MA and BA in Linguistics from the University of Washington, where she also completed post-baccalaureate studies in ceramics. Tur’s work has been exhibited nationally, including solo exhibitions at the Linda Hodges Gallery, Monarch Contemporary Gallery, the Bellevue Arts Museum, the PNW Gallery, and the UW Ceramics Gallery. She is a recipient of the Artist Trust GAP Grant, the Regional Exhibition Award from the National Council of Education for the Ceramic Arts (NCECA), and an Individual Artist Grant from 4Culture. Her artwork is held in private and public collections in Australia, France, Poland, and the United States. In addition to her art practice, Tur works as a linguist, a field from which she continues to draw inspiration. She lives in West Seattle with her partner who is an architect, and a Harrier Hound named Glinka (which means “clay” in Polish).