November at Gallery4Culture: Alexander Mouton

© 2014 Alexander Mouton, Łódź Kaliska Railway, Lodz, Poland, Archival Inkjet, 17” x25”. Courtesy of the artist.

Alexander Mouton, Some Time Later…I’m Here: Photographs from Poland and Ukraine
November 5—December 3, 2015
Opening: First Thursday, November 5, 6:00—8:00 PM
Closing: First Thursday, December 3, 6:00—8:00 PM
Please note: the gallery will be closed November 26—27 for the Thanksgiving holiday

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© 2014 Alexander Mouton, Łódź Kaliska Railway, Lodz, Poland, Archival Inkjet, 17” x25”. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2014 Alexander Mouton, Łódź Kaliska Railway, Lodz, Poland, Archival Inkjet, 17” x25”. Courtesy of the artist.

Alexander Mouton, Some Time Later…I’m Here: Photographs from Poland and Ukraine
November 5—December 3, 2015
Opening: First Thursday, November 5, 6:00—8:00 PM
Closing: First Thursday, December 3, 6:00—8:00 PM
Please note: the gallery will be closed November 26—27 for the Thanksgiving holiday

Next month, Gallery4Culture features a 22-photograph exhibition by Seattle-based artist Alexander Mouton titled Some Time Later…I’m Here: Photographs From Poland and Ukraine. The show presents select images from Mouton’s ongoing documentary project in Eastern Europe, which began directly following the fall of the Berlin Wall, when Mouton lived in Berlin, Germany for four years. His photographs explore the milieu in which those remaining Ukrainian and Polish citizens—who survived the Nazi invasion, Stalin’s brutal rule, and postwar Soviet totalitarianism—live out the remaining years of their lives. Some Time Later…I’m Here consists of color photographs from 2013, taken in Warsaw, Krakow, Lodz, and Wroclaw, Poland and in Lviv, Ukraine.

Mouton’s study in Eastern Europe was supported, in part, by a Fulbright Fellowship, during which he apprenticed to a master bookbinder and participated in international arts projects. Recently, Mouton’s photographic practice has expanded to explore new technology, showing his interactive and time-based art in national and international venues. He is currently an Associate Professor of Digital Art and Design at Seattle University.

Up Next: Gallery4Culture will be closed in December, reopening on January 7 with a solo show by Michelle de la Vega.

Artist Call: King County visual artists interested in showing work at Gallery4Culture in the 2016-17 season are encouraged to apply. Applications will be available online in December, and due January 11. Please call 206-263-1587 with any questions.

Creative Justice Mentor Artist Daemond Arrindell Embraces Challenge

Mentor Artists Daemond Arrindell leads Session 3 of the pilot year of Creative Justice. Photo by Tim Aguero.

With the pilot year of Creative Justice—4Culture’s arts-based alternative to youth incarceration in King County—almost complete, we are reflecting on lessons learned and looking towards the future. We asked Session 3 Mentor Artist, Daemond Arrindell to provide some insight into his experience working with participants and helping to shape this ground-breaking new program. The call is open for 2016 Mentor Artists—apply now!

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Mentor Artists Daemond Arrindell leads Session 3 of the pilot year of Creative Justice. Photo by Tim Aguero.
Mentor Artists Daemond Arrindell leads Session 3 of the pilot year of Creative Justice. Photo by Tim Aguero.

With the pilot year of Creative Justice—4Culture’s arts-based alternative to youth incarceration in King County—almost complete, we are reflecting on lessons learned and looking towards the future. We asked Session 3 Mentor Artist, Daemond Arrindell to provide some insight into his experience working with participants and helping to shape this ground-breaking new program. The call is open for 2016 Mentor Artists—apply now!

Last month saw the culmination of eight weeks of work for the participants of Creative Justice Session 3. The members of the group who took the stage at a celebratory closing presentation expressed pride, gratitude, and seemed to have enjoyed themselves afterwards. But, when I say “work,” I mean just that—they worked hard to get to a place where they could celebrate, and it was far from easy.

This group was at a disadvantage compared to the other Creative Justice session participants—their session took place during the summer. They had less time to get to know one another, build trust, take risks, and try on new versions of themselves. Summer is code for “break”—and it takes a great deal to compel anyone, much less a teenager, to give up part of their summer break to enter a classroom. Some of the participants knew each other, which in some ways is an asset as they supported each other, but also created cliques. If you were to sit down with any of the participants to engage in conversation, you’d find an individual with intelligence, who is inquisitive and has a mind of their own. But in a group, it’s not so easy to be an individual, especially amongst peers. So there was posturing, bravado, one-upping, and a lot of energy that was difficult to direct.

A big focus for this session was definitions and labels. All of the participants have been labelled—by family and friends, their social groups, society. Adolescence is a time when we really begin to define who are, and those labels can limit our scope, our self-worth and sense of what is possible. Each time that we got together, we began with a meal and a discussion. The topics: strength, beauty, power, respect, second chances, prison reform, self-sabotage. The discussions were rarely easy because these young people don’t typically get asked for their opinions on such matters—but that’s exactly why they should be asked. The objective: to recognize that words and definitions can be reclaimed and re-defined for ourselves, that we have agency.

Participants worked with graphic artist Greg Thornton to create their own t-shirts to visually demonstrate the principles that are important to each of them. Singer/songwriter Naomi Wachira visited them and gave a live, impromptu performance—as she began to strum her guitar and her voice filled the entire building, the participants were enthralled. It was the quietest the group had been the entire summer. They also watched a documentary called “Rubble Kings,” about the gang warfare that took place in the Bronx during the late 1960s, and how those kids transformed that violent energy into something positive—Hip-Hop.

Their final presentation followed the same format as their weekly gatherings. We began with a meal, but this time, the participants got to ask the questions. They went around to the tables of our guests and led conversations on the topic of their choosing. Some focused on second chances, others on the prison system. To close it all out they performed their script, which though edited by me was written completely by the participants. It provided an opportunity for them to share how the topics we had just discussed affect their lives personally.

It’s honestly hard to believe that it’s over—spending a little more than four hours with this group of young people each week doesn’t seem like that much, and very little of it came easy, but then they say nothing worth having ever does. All in all, that’s the deeper message, I think—to keep going, in spite of the work and challenge, so that we can become better people on the other side. That we, and the work, are worth it. Each young person walked into the sessions with a past filled with choices they made for themselves, and some choices that were made for them. The results? They still remain to be seen, but the process of trying to “Turn the Page,” which takes heart, patience, forgiveness, and courage, has begun.

– Daemond Arrindell

Apply to Be a Creative Justice Mentor Artist

Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

King County teaching artists: lift up the creativity and imagination of youth and help transform the juvenile justice system as a Creative Justice Mentor Artist!

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Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1
Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

King County teaching artists: lift up the creativity and imagination of youth and help transform the juvenile justice system as a Creative Justice Mentor Artist!

4Culture’s Creative Justice is an arts-based alternative to incarceration for court-involved youth in King County. Through collaboration with Mentor Artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions, and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more equitable justice system for the region.

Mentor Artists lead 8-12 week intensive project sessions in a range of disciplines. During these sessions, participants meet twice a week, for two hours to dialogue, create, and share meals. Each session culminates with a youth-produced event in the community.

As we wrap up a transformative pilot year of programming, we are calling for a new cohort of experienced teaching artists to facilitate 2016 project sessions. To learn more, visit our Opportunities page.

Deadline: October 12, 2015, 5:00 pm
Eligibility: Open to professional teaching artists residing in King County, WA
Compensation: $14,000
Apply: 4culture.org/apply

Your Art Could Greet Travellers at Sea-Tac Airport

© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer

Whether arriving home, changing planes, or setting off on an international adventure, the Port of Seattle Art Program wants travelers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to feel a distinctly Northwest sense of place. We’re teaming up with the Port to find two artists or artist teams to help with that goal, by creating site-specific artwork for two highly visible walls in the Airport’s North Satellite Terminal renovation.

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© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer
© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer

Whether arriving home, changing planes, or setting off on an international adventure, the Port of Seattle Art Program wants travelers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to feel a distinctly Northwest sense of place. We’re teaming up with the Port to find two artists or artist teams to help with that goal, by creating site-specific artwork for two highly visible walls in the Airport’s North Satellite Terminal renovation.

Rendering of  Concourse C Ticketing Wall (41’5”H X 152’6”W)
Rendering of Wall 2: Concourse C Ticketing Wall (41’5”H X 152’6”W)

The two walls each sit at locations that have the potential to set the tone for a traveler’s entire experience at Sea-Tac Airport.

The first wall, located between a set of escalators, runs vertically from the North Satellite Transit Station, where passenger trains run between flight gates, and up to Concourse C, visually connecting the two levels. The second wall spans an entire side of the Concourse, and its artwork will be visible to all passengers as they walk in.

What does it mean for something – or somewhere – to feel like the Northwest? To help guide the development of the terminal and its artwork, the Port of Seattle team brainstormed a collection of words that speak to the intangible qualities that make our region distinct:

Adventure, biophilic, curiosity, experience, experimentation, and exploration, frontier of possibility, innovation, risk-taking.

As you get ready to apply, we ask artists to consider these descriptors. Eventually, the selected artists will work with the Port design team to integrate their artwork into the overall building design, and create continuity within the terminal.

This opportunity is open to professional artists living in the United States and Canada. The budget for the project is $300,000 – $500,000. Please review the full Call for Artists before applying. All application materials must be submitted online by Thursday, October 1, 2015 by 5:00 pm PST. Questions? Contact Tamar Benzikry at tamar.benzikry@4culture.org or 206-263-1617.

 

 

Get Inspired for Tech Specific

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Tech-Specific ENews-Blog-01

Our Site Specific Program has been inspiring innovation and reaching new communities since 2005—this year, it’s going tech. Tech Specific invites artists using technological mediums—from old-school to emerging—to apply for funding, and encourages designers, fabricators, engineers, developers, media-producers, and more to see themselves as artists and apply their skills to creative projects! Individuals, collaborative teams, and organizations are all encouraged to apply.

We know – it’s open-ended! If you’re excited to apply, but curious about how and where art and tech can coexist, here are some examples from around the world to get you thinking:

Somebody by Miranda July, supported by Miu Miu
Somebody by Miranda July, supported by Miu Miu

The Somebody App by Miranda July purposefully counteracts the ease of text-messaging, asking us to examine how technology has rewired how we communicate. A message sent through Somebody relies on nearby strangers to get where it’s going – app users can view a list of waiting messages, and opt to deliver them, in person, following any instructions for tone or gesture from the sender. Every message becomes a web of connectivity.

Bacteria, antimicrobials, DNA sequencing – these are not often, if ever, found among lists of the tools that artists use. Anna Dumitriu’s work uses all of them and more to explore how art and science intersect.  The Sequence Dress is stained with Staphylococcus aureus bacteria from Dumitriu’s body, grown on color-changing cultures, and surrounded by a digital projection of the genome sequence of that same bacteria.

Theo Jansen uses simple elements – piping, wood, fabric – and centuries-old technology to create something entirely new: Strandbeest. These wind-walkers have evolved since 1990 as Jansen adapts them to the beaches on which they roam. Creatures that started as simple assemblages can now make decisions, move without wind, and keep themselves safe during storms. Check one out in action:

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kl0d1UdP2rw[/youtube]

 

Still not sure if your project qualifies? 4Culture staff will offer drop-in workshops, where we’ll explain the application and panel review process and contracting requirements, and answer any questions applicants may have. The workshops are free and open to the public, no pre-registration required. Staff is also always available for one on one inquiries from interested applicants!

Workshop Schedule
4Culture offices, 101 Prefontaine Pl S

Friday, September 11, 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Friday, September 18, 5:00 – 6:30 pm
Friday, September 25, 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Friday, October 2, 12:00 – 1:00 pm

Application and guidelines are available online; the deadline to apply is October 15 at 5:00 pm. Contact Charlie Rathbun at charlie.rathbun@4culture.org, (206) 263-1607 with any questions.

 

 

Plant 2015 at Jack Block Park, from Artist Jordan West Monez

Jordan West Monez is a multi-disciplinary designer who received funding through our Historic Site Specific program – below, Jordan shares more about her project. In 2016, the Site Specific program will be tech-focused – the deadline to apply is October 15, 2015. 

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Plant2015_installJordan West Monez is a multi-disciplinary designer who received funding through our Historic Site Specific program – below, Jordan shares more about her project. In 2016, the Site Specific program will be tech-focused – the deadline to apply is October 15, 2015. 

Plant 2015 has been installed at the Port of Seattle’s Jack Block Park and at Boeing Plant 2 as part of Duwamish Revealed, a multi-media celebration of the Duwamish River. Plant 2015 re-creates a series of sculptural trees inspired by the artificial suburban landscape built on Boeing’s Plant 2 during World War II. The scale model of the suburban fabric was built to camouflage the factory from the air and was decommissioned shortly after the war. Plant 2015 draws on this history to focus attention on the duality of nature and culture on the river and focus attention on what has been and is now concealed along the Duwamish River.

As Seattle’s only river, the heavily industrialized Duwamish holds layers of history and meaning, people and culture, contamination and habitat. The Lower Duwamish Waterway was recently named a USEPA Superfund Site and the cleanup process is underway. Boeing Plant 2 was recently demolished and the shoreline restored to remove polluted sediment and create wildlife habitat. Plant 2015 layers a past history onto the present landscape to remind us of how quickly things can change to alter a place.

A gathering to celebrate Plant 2015 is planned for Saturday, August 15 at Jack Block Park, and the project is currently visible to the public at Jack Block Park and at Boeing Plant 2 on the southeast side of the South Park Bridge.

On e4c in August: Evertt Beidler

© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

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© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c will begin again this August, featuring the work of Evertt A. Beidler. Beidler is a multi-disciplinary artist residing in Portland, Oregon, with work included in private collections across the United States and on public display at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers in Cairo, Illinois, which is the first public commission of his career. Beidler writes, “My work utilizes the production of sculpture and live action as a means of interfacing the realm of the imaginary with the realm of the real. Content for my work is derived from personal experience and employs the traditional format of the ‘self-portrait’ as a means of telling stories that are autobiographical in nature. My most recent works combine elements of film, performance, public art, and the technical aspects of producing a functional sculpture into a single endeavor.”

Beidler’s work will be followed by seven other artists, selected from a pool of 35 applicants from across the United States. We look forward to presenting their work! Check back often to see who we’re featuring, and make sure to catch a glimpse of our windows next time your bus passes through Prefontaine Place South.

 

Conductive Garboil Grant Application Deadline: August 17

Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

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Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.
Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

Do you push the creative act beyond accepted limits? Do you engage audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex? If you happen to be a King County resident with a significant connection to Pioneer Square, consider applying for the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant. Individual artists and artist teams working in any media or discipline are eligible.

To learn more about the opportunity, visit garboil.org.

Apply: 4culture.org/apply
Deadline: Monday, August 17, 2015