Otieno Terry on Creative Justice

Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

Singer-songwriter, producer, and teaching artist, Otieno Terry, led the 2nd project session of our inaugural year of programming. Otieno believes that music strongly influences the minds of young people and uses his art to inspire positivity, self-confidence, discipline, and healing. From March 23rd through June 10th, he worked with 12 teen participants twice per week as they discovered the history of music in America and their own creative voices through instrumentation, vocalization, and writing.

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice Session 2 was a beautiful experience. Encompassing a large spectrum of emotions, the participants had an opportunity to build relationships and community through conversations about society and their perception of reality. We explored world history from different perspectives, focusing on the black experience, the transition from being African to becoming American, and how it affects us today. We talked about the importance of knowing the past and understanding the power of expression and its influence, particularly through music and social media.

The first few weeks of the session were somewhat quiet and cool, and at times awkward, as most things are in the world of teenagers. However, slowly but surely, their wisdom, talent, and youthfulness began to seep into the space we created together, through conversation, collaboration and improvisation. I started to realize how much potential every single student had, and even their circumstances couldn’t put out the flame of hope and joy that continues to burn honestly and unapologetically within.

When they began to record their work, I found that although their youthful flame burns brightly, joyfully and even carelessly at times, their art reflected their complexities and profound awareness of the world they are a part of. Through their honest expression, I now further understand the power of vulnerability, integrity and persistence. They are living proof that hope is real, that love is real, and that there is a warrior that lives in each of us, ready to fight for what we truly believe in.

I am incredibly grateful and honored to have spent such precious time with these students and in service of Creative Justice. It has strengthened my faith in our community, and I look forward to seeing the beauty and greatness that they will bless the world with going forward.

– Otieno Terry

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac – and Five Other Extraordinary and Endangered Historic Properties in Washington

© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

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© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

At the time of its creation, Johnson Pit #30 looked out on a sparsely developed Kent Valley with a rich agricultural history. Its contemplative site and bucolic view has since been dramatically changed by housing and industrial developments. 4Culture is committed to the preservation and restoration of this unique artwork. The designation by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation and an earlier recognition as part of the Cultural Landscape Foundation’s Landslide 2014 Art and the Landscape will help the efforts to secure King County landmark status and a listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Since 1992, the independent, nonprofit Washington Trust for Historic Preservation has used its Most Endangered Historic Properties List to bring attention to over 100 threatened sites nominated by concerned citizens and organizations across the state. As part of this outreach and education program, the Washington Trust assists advocates to develop strategies and opportunities for reducing immediate threats and to find positive preservation solutions for the endangered historic properties.

The six projects featured in this year’s Most Endangered List, including the Robert Morris Earthwork, are described in short videos and linked photos posted on the Washington Trust website.

Experience "A Taste of Home"

Hollis Wong-Wear and Val Tan taste food at Tai Tung Restaurant © 2015 Photo Courtesy of Tay + Val

The Chinatown-International District has played a central role in the story of Seattle’s Asian-American community for more than 120 years. Walking through the neighborhood today, you pass ornamental arches, historic placards and numerous small shops. But more than anything else, you are enveloped by food. Rows of hanging whole roasted ducks, glass jars stuffed with licorice plums, the beany aroma of a tofu factory. Food is central to our cultural identity, meals around the world are eaten in intimate quarters, shared with family and friends. As such, it is often the first place we turn when home is far away.

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Hollis Wong-Wear and Val Tan taste food at Tai Tung Restaurant © 2015 Photo Courtesy of Tay + Val

The Chinatown-International District has played a central role in the story of Seattle’s Asian-American community for more than 120 years. Walking through the neighborhood today, you pass ornamental arches, historic placards and numerous small shops. But more than anything else, you are enveloped by food. Rows of hanging whole roasted ducks, glass jars stuffed with licorice plums, the beany aroma of a tofu factory. Food is central to our cultural identity, meals around the world are eaten in intimate quarters, shared with family and friends. As such, it is often the first place we turn when home is far away.

03 Not an easy task
Making Toisanese Joong © 2015 Photo Courtesy of Tay + Val

Film-making duo Tay and Val invite you to experience A Taste of Home. This series of webisodes takes you to five of the oldest Chinese American restaurants in the International District – each establishment serving up the story of a traditional dish, drawing connections between food, culture, history and the essence of home. Guest hosts include 4Culture Board Member Hollis
Wong-­Wear, Seattle food anthropologist Maxine Chan, and more.

Join us for the global premier on June 27. In addition to being among the first to view A Taste of Home, you will have the opportunity to eat complementary dishes featured in the series and visit a display of images comparing past to present in the International District.

A Taste of Home Global Premier
Saturday, June 27, 2015 | 3:00 – 5:00PM
Wing Luke Museum
719 S King St, Seattle, WA 98104
FREE; RSVP REQUIRED

Join the conversation by using the hashtag #ATOH

This project was supported by our Heritage Projects grant program.

Celebrate 100 years of Japanese-American Newspapers

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NNDA

The North American Times, later called the North American Post, was founded right here in Seattle’s International District in 1902. Today it remains the largest and oldest Japanese-language newspaper in the Pacific Northwest. After three and a half years of collaborative effort the Hokubei Hochi foundation has created a digital archive containing over 100 years of newspapers, giving an important glimpse into the lives of those in local Nikkei (Japanese-American) community. Officially called the Nikkei Newspapers Digital Archive, it will be accessible to the public through a new website hosted by the University of Washington Libraries.

HHF_2012HCC_01To celebrate this incredible resource, and the work required to make it possible, the Hokubei Hochi foundation is hosting a free community reception with complementary parking and refreshments at the newly-reopened Nagomi Teahouse. A panel will discuss the archiving process and the history of the local Japanese-American community, starting with the Issei and Nisei (first and second-generation Japanese Americans).

Public Unveiling of the Nikkei Newspapers Digital Archive
Monday, June 8, 2015 | 6:30-8:00 PM
Nagomi Tea House
519 6th Ave S Seattle, WA 98104

 

A Local Odyssey of Epic Proportions

The World War II Odyssey of King County's Japanese Americans, educational supplement, 2014, courtesy of Newspapers In Education
The World War II Odyssey of King County's Japanese Americans, educational supplement, 2014, courtesy of Newspapers In Education
The World War II Odyssey of King County’s Japanese Americans, educational supplement, 2014, courtesy of Newspapers In Education

The Seattle Times Literacy Fund, Newspapers In Education program partnered with Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project to develop The World War II Odyssey of King County’s Japanese Americans, an eight-page full color educational supplement originally published in The Seattle Times on Sunday, April 12, 2015. The supplement tells the story of Japanese Americans’ involuntary migration during WWII, featuring the personal journeys of Akiko Kato, a 17-year-old student at Seattle’s Garfield High School, and Shosuke Sasaki, a 30-year-old Japanese immigrant raised and educated in the Seattle area. Densho has added digital components of this project to their website, including an interactive flipbook of the supplement, access to an online course for educators, historical videos and a bibliography.

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The World War II Odyssey of King County's Japanese Americans, educational supplement, 2014, courtesy of Newspapers In Education
The World War II Odyssey of King County’s Japanese Americans, educational supplement, 2014, courtesy of Newspapers In Education

The Seattle Times Literacy Fund, Newspapers In Education program partnered with Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project to develop The World War II Odyssey of King County’s Japanese Americans, an eight-page full color educational supplement originally published in The Seattle Times on Sunday, April 12, 2015. The supplement tells the story of Japanese Americans’ involuntary migration during WWII, featuring the personal journeys of Akiko Kato, a 17-year-old student at Seattle’s Garfield High School, and Shosuke Sasaki, a 30-year-old Japanese immigrant raised and educated in the Seattle area. Densho has added digital components of this project to their website, including an interactive flipbook of the supplement, access to an online course for educators, historical videos and a bibliography.

This project was partially funded through 4Culture’s Heritage Projects program. A PDF copy of the supplement is also available through seattletimes.com/nie or hard copies can be requested from The Seattle Times Newspapers In Education or Densho. Newspapers In Education is a free program offered to all classroom educators.

It's Official: May is Arts Education Month in King County!

Amy Whittenberg, Interim Director of ArtsEd Washington holds the Proclamation standing with Una McAlinden, Former Executive Director of ArtsEd Washington with King County Councilmembers and 4Culture staff.

Thank you to our King County Council for issuing a formal proclamation on May 4 designating May 2015 as Arts Education Month. The Council joins Washington State Governor Jay Inslee, the Washington State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, and the 4Culture Board in recognizing the arts as a fundamental component of a complete education for every student in every school in Washington State. Council Chair Larry Phillips, prime sponsor of the proclamation, states,

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KingCounltyCouncilArtsRecog05_04 _15
Amy Whittenberg, Interim Director of ArtsEd Washington holds the Proclamation standing with Una McAlinden, Former Executive Director of ArtsEd Washington with King County Councilmembers and 4Culture staff.

Thank you to our King County Council for issuing a formal proclamation on May 4 designating May 2015 as Arts Education Month. The Council joins Washington State Governor Jay Inslee, the Washington State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, and the 4Culture Board in recognizing the arts as a fundamental component of a complete education for every student in every school in Washington State. Council Chair Larry Phillips, prime sponsor of the proclamation, states,

“Children with exposure to a diverse arts education grow up with the cognitive skills and ingenuity to not only enrich their community but work successfully in a variety of fields as well.”

Thank you also to our partners at ArtsEd Washington who are working hard to ensure that all schools have the tools, training and information necessary to provide the arts education their students need to thrive in the 21st century. We encourage all cities and school districts throughout King County and Washington State to join us in celebrating the creative accomplishments of our amazing students and teachers.

Free Resource for Artists: Lynda.com

Tory Franklin , artist, teacher and collaborator, is currently working with sister Eroyn Franklin on a public artwork for Harborview in the form of digital designs for vinyl window graphics. 4Culture asked Tory to share information about a new (free) resource  available through the King County and Seattle Library systems.

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Lynda.com_BlogTory Franklin , artist, teacher and collaborator, is currently working with sister Eroyn Franklin on a public artwork for Harborview in the form of digital designs for vinyl window graphics. 4Culture asked Tory to share information about a new (free) resource  available through the King County and Seattle Library systems.

Artists today use technology extensively. Sometimes it’s getting together those smashing images for applications or crafting a website, or maybe you need to create files for a project with 3d printing or laser cutting. And you probably want to track what’s happening with your artwork in the world with some sort of business software. Unless you acquired some of these skills in school you’re probably asking your tech savvy friend (or even your kid) to help you muddle through it or just giving up and paying someone to make it close to what you want.

So what can you do besides plunking down a bunch of money to get those skills? You can sit in your pajamas with a nice cup of tea and enter the world of Lynda.com…for free. Thanks to our amazing regional libraries you can save the monthly fee. Both the Seattle Public Library and the King County Library offer a pass to most of the videos at Lynda. For those of you outside of the Seattle area you may belong to another organization that has access, ask your local library!

For the uninitiated Lynda is a website brimming with in-depth videos on virtually any software available that is constantly updated. They can be several hours long but you can save your spot and you can jump to different chapters. If you retain written information better, follow the transcript beside the video. Even if you’re running an older version of a program there’s a good chance you can search for videos on your version.

Lynda has separate libraries for 3D + Animation, Audio + Music, Business, CAD, Design, Developer, Education + Elearning, IT, Marketing, Photography, Video and Web. Each section is separated into Course Topics, Software and Resources. They’re also designated as Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced and Appropriate for All, so you don’t get too far in over your head. You can search for a topic or software and see where it takes you, and that cool video you find along the way but don’t want to get sidetracked – you can add it to your playlist for later.

Go to lynda.com and in the login is a section to log in through your organization. Put in the website of the library that you belong to (spl.org or kcls.org) and you will be directed to a new page that lets you put in your library card number and pin. Its as easy as checking out a ebook.

Artists Up: Celebration & Networking Event

Tyrone Brown and Marita Dingus at an Artists Up event in 2014. Photo: Robert Wade Photography
Tyrone Brown and Marita Dingus at an Artists Up event in 2014. Photo: Robert Wade Photography
Tyrone Brown and Marita Dingus at an Artists Up event in 2014. Photo: Robert Wade Photography

Artists Up is pleased to invite artists who have participated in our past events, as well as artists interested in learning more about our goals and networking with other artists in the region – to a celebration and networking event. Light refreshments will be served.

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Tyrone Brown and Marita Dingus at an Artists Up event in 2014. Photo: Robert Wade Photography
Tyrone Brown and Marita Dingus at an Artists Up event in 2014. Photo: Robert Wade Photography

Artists Up is pleased to invite artists who have participated in our past events, as well as artists interested in learning more about our goals and networking with other artists in the region – to a celebration and networking event. Light refreshments will be served.

June 8th 6-8:30 PM

ArtXchange Gallery, 512 1st Avenue South, Seattle

FREE, but space is limited to artists who RSVP

Between 2013-2015, Artists Up presented a series of focus groups, networking events and resource programs for and with artists from the Latino/a; Asian/Asian-American/Pacific Islander; African /African-American/Black and Native communities. This work is an effort to improve and expand services and resources for artists of color in our region. This event is to thank all of the artists we’ve connected and worked with, throughout the series. It’s also an opportunity for diverse creative communities to share ideas, promote their work, explore collaboration and get to know each other. Come celebrate with us! 

 

ARTISTS UP is a unique partnership between two government agencies (4Culture and Seattle Office of Arts & Culture) and a private foundation (Artist Trust). We share a goal of providing greater access to grants, commissions and resources for artists of color in Washington State.