Guest Post: Kent Arts Commission launches Kent Creates

Approaching Storm by John Armstrong – an Inaugural Exhibit Winner

4Culture is opening up shop in Kent, with Hello 4Culture, and we thought it was a good time to check in with Ronda Billerbeck, the Cultural Programs Manager for the City of Kent and Director of the Kent Arts Commission, to see what she’s working on these days. We were excited to learn about one of their new programs, which includes an dynamic way to participate in the arts. We asked Ronda to share her news:

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Approaching Storm by John Armstrong – an Inaugural Exhibit Winner

4Culture is opening up shop in Kent, with Hello 4Culture, and we thought it was a good time to check in with Ronda Billerbeck, the Cultural Programs Manager for the City of Kent and Director of the Kent Arts Commission, to see what she’s working on these days. We were excited to learn about one of their new programs, which includes an dynamic way to participate in the arts. We asked Ronda to share her news:

The Kent Arts Commission is proud to announce the launch of Kent Creates. This web platform for sharing art, culture, and creative endeavors is meant to be a community of imagination and inspiration for anyone who creates or seeks to be inspired by creativity.

Kent Creates is for artists, musicians, writers, crafters, illustrators, dancers, filmmakers, hobbyists, and other creatives to share their work and meet people with similar interests. Creative work of all kinds may be shared on KentCreates.com  – drawings, cartoons, recipes, do-it-yourself how-to videos, short films, and anything else creative minds can dream up.

The project started as a dream to involve and engage the public on a new level. Instead of commissioning an artist to make a piece of art to be passively experienced and enjoyed by the public, Kent Creates encourages Kent residents to be the artists.

We recognized a national trend – Individuals taking a more hands-on role in their participation of arts and culture, and often using technology to that end. Kent Creates is a response to these shifts in the way we generate and consume creative material.

The Kent Arts Commission believes strongly in the power of art to transform the lives of individuals and communities, and that creative pursuits are truly for everyone – not just professional artists. We know Kent – and the larger Puget Sound region – is home to a wealth of creativity including writers, musicians, singers, photographers, filmmakers, and others keeping traditional ethnic arts alive. We are pleased to implement Kent Creates to build connections through showcasing that creativity.

An Inaugural Exhibit was held in October and November of 2015 to launch and test Kent Creates; it garnered 48 submissions including photography, collage, painting, piano composition, poetry and more. The Kent Arts Commission voted on submissions and, in keeping with the Commission’s commitment to pay artists for their work, the top five pieces received $100 honorariums. The winners’ work also appears on the featured carousel on the Kent Creates homepage.

The five winners from the Inaugural Exhibit are: John Armstrong (photography), Mary Ann Cagley (encaustic photo transfer), Jamie Greene (watercolor), Arries McQuarter (piano composition), and Naoko Morisawa (mosaic collage).

The next exhibit for Kent Creates is open January 23 through March 31 and focuses on the theme of “Home.” The call for entries reads:

What does ‘home’ mean to you? In today’s world, many people move far away from the place they were born and raised, to distant cities, states, and countries. As a result, our communities are more diverse with people from varied ethnic, religious, socio-economic, and geographic backgrounds. Despite our differences, home is a common concept, one that elicits strong feelings, memories, and hopes. Is home where you currently live? Is it where you’re from? Is home a place or is it a feeling? Is it a group of people, a memory, or even a period of time? What is HOME?

Work may be submitted through March 31, 2017 – at which time the exhibit will close. The Kent Arts Commission will select the top five pieces, which will receive $100 honorariums and featured status on the site.

Kent Creates is free to use and anyone, anywhere can sign up; there is no requirement to live in Kent.

 

They Come in Threes: Opportunities for Artists

n, Part of the Cycle, on view at e4c © 2016 photo Sean Stearns

If you’re an artist interested in unique, outside-the-box opportunities, this September has lots to offer. Whether you have new media work you want to share with the public, need funding for a technology-based art project, or are interested in helping us learn how to better serve artists, make sure these deadlines are on your calendar:

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If you’re an artist interested in unique, outside-the-box opportunities, this September has lots to offer. Whether you have new media work you want to share with the public, need funding for a technology-based art project, or are interested in helping us learn how to better serve artists, make sure these deadlines are on your calendar:

Call for artists: e4c 2017 season
Deadline: Wednesday, September 28, 5:00 pm PST

e4c is our highly visible venue for emerging artists to present work in Seattle’s vibrant Pioneer Square neighborhood. Since 2008, more than seventy artists have presented their media artworks to an audience on the move: bus and car commuters, pedestrians, and bicyclists. This call is for independent electronic media artists living in the U.S. and working in all genres. Artworks between 1-5 minutes are desired. Up to 15 artists will be selected to present work for as long as one year, and each selected artist will receive a $500 honorarium.

Artists Up Grant Lab
Deadline: Wednesday, September 28, 5:00 pm PST
Introducing Grant Lab: the grant that’s also an experiment! Through our collaborative program Artists Up, artists of color have given us ideas about how to make our grants more accessible, and now we’re testing them out. By applying, you’ll help us learn how we can improve our programs. Visit our Opportunities page to see the full guidelines, and learn more about Artists Up.

Tech Specific Grant
Deadline: Thursday, September 29, 5:00 pm PST
Calling all makers! Are you working where art and tech collide? Have a project in mind that could use some help getting off the ground? Analog to digital, low-tech to high-tech, individuals to organizations—we’re interested in supporting it all. Learn more about the grant requirements online, and come meet your fellow tinkerers and chat with us about it at an Art + Tech Happy Hour on August 30!

Help Set the SODO Track in Motion

SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

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SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.
SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

We’re kicking off the project in style, and you’re invited. Head to SODO and make this exciting launch event part of your Seattle Art Fair celebrations:

Saturday, August 6, 6:00-9:00 pm
Metropolist, 2931 First Avenue South, Suite A, Seattle
A suggested $20 donation at the door includes two drink tickets (21 and over) and a special guest music performance. See street art in progress on the big screen, enjoy food trucks, find out how you can help out with this project, and more!

The first phase of painting is underway! Artists from Germany, the Netherlands, Los Angeles, Portland, and, of course, Seattle are hard at work in SODO, painting through August 10. Get to know them at sodotrack.com, and get a peek at what they’re each creating for the SODO Track on Instagram by checking out #SODOtrack.

Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.
Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.

If you’d like to join the team, stay tuned to 4Culture this summer for information on a call for artists for a Muralist Roster. This list of pre-qualified artists will be used as a resource to staff projects for the SODO Track and throughout King County. We’ll be taking applications through October! The SODO Track will transform 2 miles of SODO building backs into an international arts destination over the next three summers. Artists from around the world will paint alongside the Pacific Northwest’s best, marking SODO as the creative gateway to Seattle, and making your experience of traveling through the neighborhood so exciting you won’t be able to look away.

Creative Justice Honored with PAN Award

Mentor Artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

We are thrilled to announce that Creative Justice, our arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, has been recognized with a Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review award!

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Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor Artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

We are thrilled to announce that Creative Justice, our arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, has been recognized with a Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review award!

Piloted in 2015, the program is funded by Percent for Art revenue generated through the design and construction of the county’s new Children and Family Justice Center—which will collocate the region’s juvenile court and jail—and a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Forty eight youth facing criminal charges worked with mentor artists—Aaron Counts, Daemond Arrindell, Nikkita Oliver, Otieno Terry, and Shontina Vernon—instead of being detained. In exchange for their creative work and through partnership with the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, participants received community service credit, cash stipends, and a range of court benefits. Of the 48 participants, 29 had their charges dismissed. King County is now asking that the program be expanded in 2016 and beyond.

Creative Justice is one of 38 outstanding public artworks to be honored by Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. PAN is the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art. Three of the projects recognized this year were supported by Washington State organizations.

Of the award, Aaron Counts, Lead Engagement Artist for Creative Justice, said:

The Creative Justice team is grateful for this acknowledgement, and so proud of the work we’re doing. The school to prison pipeline is real, and far too many of our youth—most of them black, brown, and poor—are jailed despite major research that shows incarceration does not make communities any safer.

Rather than further stigmatize and isolate young people in crisis, Creative Justice rallies around them, providing creative development through meaningful interactions with supportive mentor artists. But more importantly, Creative Justice has asked our juvenile justice system to behave differently, too: by viewing our youth with a wider lens, trusting the community to address its own needs, and celebrating the strengths and creativity of young people who are trying to navigate a complex world.

Using the power of art to share our struggles and articulate our potential, Creative Justice is building a stronger community here in King County.

Learn more about the program, its impact, and the incredible creative work of our youth at creativejustice.4culture.org.

 

An Evening of Art and Water in Georgetown

Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.

What can artists offer in the context of a city-wide water infrastructure project? Plenty.

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Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.
Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.

What can artists offer in the context of a city-wide water infrastructure project? Plenty.

King County and Seattle are realizing an ambitious plan to protect the health of our waterways. A complex network of facilities, treatment, and conveyance, King County’s control plan in Seattle is designed to dramatically limit combined sewer overflows—or CSOs—caused by excess stormwater in the sewer system on rainy days. CSOs exist only in older Seattle neighborhoods, where one set of pipes carries both sewage and stormwater. The facilities built in those neighborhoods include a provision for 1% for public art.

…the CSO system is everywhere, it affects us all….miles of pipes, treatment and tanks, networking water around the city—movement and drama underground the mind can barely imagine. This is where artists can excel, expressing big ideas, connections seen and unseen, tapping feelings and emotions, exposing the essence of what it is to be human and relate to the world around us.
-From the CSO Art Master Plan

In March of last year we announced that Sans façon had been selected to develop a CSO Art Master Plan. The plan is now complete and the planning artists are ready to share their recommendations for how art experiences can create an emotional connection to the CSO system for citizens at an event that is free and open to the public. In the first hour, Sans façon will present the CSO Art Master Plan curatorial framework, ethos, and opportunities for commissioned artists. In the second hour, a panel discussion will focus on artists working in the context of water utilities and infrastructure. Join us!

Art + Water at Oxbow in Georgetown
June 16, 2016, 7:00—9:00 pm
6118 12th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98108

June at Gallery4Culture: Pat De Caro

Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.

Pat De Caro
Foreign Shores
June 2—30, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, June 2, 6:00—8:00 pm

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Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.
Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.

Pat De Caro
Foreign Shores
June 2—30, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, June 2, 6:00—8:00 pm

Pat De Caro presents Foreign Shores, an expansive collection of over eighty charcoal drawings that reflect our relationship to memory and time. Mounted in a narrative grid, extending wall to wall and floor to ceiling, the drawings surround the viewer. They promote meanings and metaphoric connections that shift with emotion, much like light changes according to time, weather, and season.

Rather than limiting the world to singular moments, De Caro’s drawings release us from cartography and encourage us to navigate the waters of our own experience. Her imagery evokes stories passed on, shared and constructed to give expression to a collective consciousness.

“I’m pondering that place between knowing and not knowing, when perception seems real, yet it triggers a vibration in our memory” says DeCaro. “Foreign Shores refers to the edge that defines those waters—waters that are both familiar and mysterious at the same time.”

About the Artist: Pat De Caro’s paintings and drawings have been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Yvonne Twining Humber Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts and grants from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund (NYC), the Ford Foundation, and the Seattle Arts Commission; she also received a Fulbright-Hayes Fellowship in Painting and was a Neddy Artist Award finalist. De Caro has participated in residencies at Pilchuck School of Glass, Ateliers Hoherweg (Dusseldorf), the Ragdale Foundation, and the MacDowell Colony.

Website: patdecaro.com
Up Next: Gallery4Culture will feature Andrew Hoeppner in July.

2016-2017 Season @ Gallery4Culture

The annual Gallery4Culture application cycle closed on January 11th. In mid-February, the selection panel met and deliberated. Beth Sellars, independent curator and co-founder of Suyama Space, and gallery alumni Rodrigo Valenzuela and Kimberly Trowbridge chose ten artists and artist teams for exhibitions beginning this fall and running through July 2017. The artists, listed in the order of their scheduled shows, are as follows:

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The annual Gallery4Culture application cycle closed on January 11th. In mid-February, the selection panel met and deliberated. Beth Sellars, independent curator and co-founder of Suyama Space, and gallery alumni Rodrigo Valenzuela and Kimberly Trowbridge chose ten artists and artist teams for exhibitions beginning this fall and running through July 2017. The artists, listed in the order of their scheduled shows, are as follows:

September 2016: Sylwia Tur’s installation expresses the language of structures, space, and movement. By juxtaposing sculptural objects, primarily in porcelain, she constructs new spatial relationships, accesses memory, and expands perceptual awareness in an attempt to find the meeting point between image and architecture.

October 2016: Brit Ruggirello lives in a house called Blue Hotel. She wants to know why living in a space that she’s named feels different than living in a truly blue environment. Her exhibition explores digital and physical worlds, negotiating between the imagined and the real, with found objects, vibrantly colored light bulbs, pastel gradients, and photography.

Brit Ruggirello. Brit_2, 2015. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, pink sand, Ikea leg, fake flowers, ribbon, office mat, plant, and white vase.
Brit Ruggirello. Brit_2, 2015. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, pink sand, Ikea leg, fake flowers, ribbon, office mat, plant, and white vase.

November 2016: Deborah Lawrence uses satirical collage as a political and psychological tool. Aligned with the 58th quadrennial U.S. presidential election, she exhibits collages – rendered on canvas, paper, board and recycled metal serving trays – that reflect a decades-long interest in social justice.

January 2017: David Jaewon Oh’s Combatants series explores gender identity and gender roles through the documentation of women in combat sports. Large scale photographic portraits of female fighters in their respective gyms, an environment in which they are often the minority, highlight their strength and endurance as well as the changing the face of field.

Oh_D_06
David Jaewon Oh. Jessica, 2015. Digital C-Print.

February 2017: Chris McMullen is fascinated with industrial processes. His interactive installation will challenge viewers, both mentally and physically, as they collaborate to activate a room-filling sculpture. This kinetic engagement is meant to encourage face to face communication and grounding in our increasingly digital world.

March 2017: Deanne Belinoff’s abstract drawings and paintings express ideas about reality and its underpinnings, the vast rotations of solar systems, and the implicit connection of all things in the universe. Her exhibition will feature new works inspired by infinity, gravity and time, revealing her personal relationship with the cosmos.

April 2017: Jackson Baker Ryan, Alex Boeschenstein, and Max Cleary will unveil their newest body of residential real estate products and services. With a vision of a stranger future and a mix of hope, irony and apprehension, they will introduce divergent practices informed by prevailing industry pathologies.

Cleary_M_05
Jackson Baker Ryan. Awarded Multitasker’s Association, Seal of Approval, 2016. Digital collage.

May 2017: Katie Miller’s immersive, site-specific installation captures contemporary life and architecture in Pioneer Square through the lens of the silhouette. Imagery and light become active elements in the creation of three dimensional space, inspiring a visceral shift in perception and awareness and helping to redefine our relationship with our surroundings.

June 2017: Paul Komada’s practice reveals the metaphoric space between painting as object and painting as action. Using chroma-key technology to layer images, he inserts himself into his work and blurs the line between process and performance. Concurrent exhibitions at Gallery4Culture and SOIL – one abstract and one documentary, both consisting of images and sounds of the soon to be demolished Alaskan Way Viaduct – will establish a dialogue between the two venues.

July 2017: Jennifer Zwick presents digital photography and constructed three dimensional vignettes focused on the themes of symmetry and duality. Living space and artifice are of special interest as well; she enjoys the subtle subversion of reality.

4Culture would like to thank all 145 gallery applicants for their interest in exhibiting with us and the panel for their diligence in making the selections. Applicants who were not awarded shows are encouraged to reapply next year. The 2017—2018 Gallery4Culture season application deadline will be Monday, January 9, 2017.

Congratulations to our 2016—2017 exhibiting artists! We look forward to this series of strong, boundary-pushing shows.

Welcome to the New 4Culture Application Portal!

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typewriter

We’re kicking off 2016 with an exciting new technology update! Even though 4Culture has long-since left hard copy grant applications in the past, our online application portal needed a refresh. After many months of research, testing, and feedback, we’re proud to launch our new grants application portal.

Making submitting your grant applications and managing your awards as easy as possible is one of the core ways 4Culture supports cultural happenings in King County. With this update, the portal now features:

  • Streamlined, one-page grant applications.
  • The ability to submit invoices and track payments online—no more paper invoices!
  • Ready access to full grant history and copies of digital contracts.

All of our open grants can be accessed at apply.4culture.org. Whether or not you’ve applied for a 4Culture grant in the past, you will need to register with the new portal—if you are a returning applicant, feel free to reuse your old username and password. Once you’ve registered, you’ll receive an activation e-mail. After that, you’ll be able to login to apply.4culture.org and apply for new grants, download copies of your digitally signed contracts, request payments, and update your profile.

One important thing to note is that all users will need a unique e-mail address, just like when subscribing to Spotify or shopping on Amazon. If you have applied to 4Culture using an address on more than one account, you’ll have to decide which address to use with which account going forward.

Important note for Gallery4Culture applicants: this application has not been moved to our new system. Gallery4Culture applications—as well as all Public Art calls and applications—can be accessed by logging in under “Public Art Calls for Artists + Gallery4Culture” from the application portal landing page.

Please contact Bart J. Cannon at bart.j.cannon@4culture.org or 206 263.1584 with any questions as you use this new tool.

 

Tech Specific Strikes a Chord

Isabelle Choinière, MUE DE L'ANGE, 2002, image courtesy of Suyama Space. Multi-disciplinary artist Fernanda D’Agostino will collaborate with choreographers, sound and video artists to create an interactive environmental performance installation as the final exhibition of the Suyama Space before it closes at the end of 2016

Our long-running Site Specific program went tech in 2015. We invited artists using all kinds of technological mediums to apply for funding, and encouraged designers, fabricators, engineers, developers, media-producers, and more to see themselves as artists. The deadline was in October, and with a record number of applications, it’s clear that this grant tapped into King County’s emerging fascination with the overlap of art and technology. Many hours of evaluation and discussion from a panel of experts later, we’re proud to announce that 20 projects have been recommended for a total of $150,000 in funding! Here are a few highlights—stay tuned for updates as projects take shape over the coming year:

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Our long-running Site Specific program went tech in 2015. We invited artists using all kinds of technological mediums to apply for funding, and encouraged designers, fabricators, engineers, developers, media-producers, and more to see themselves as artists. The deadline was in October, and with a record number of applications, it’s clear that this grant tapped into King County’s emerging fascination with the overlap of art and technology. Many hours of evaluation and discussion from a panel of experts later, we’re proud to announce that 20 projects have been recommended for a total of $150,000 in funding! Here are a few highlights—stay tuned for updates as projects take shape over the coming year:

James Coupe, Exercises in Passivity
Exercises in Passivity throws neuroscience, surveillance technology, and sleep states together to explore concepts of privacy, vulnerability, and trust.. The project uses sleep patterns, monitored by observing brain activity and eye movement on EEG equipment, to control a fleet of remote unmanned aerial vehicles—or, drones. Once REM sleep is detected, a drone will take off from a remote location and follow a flight path determined by fluctuations in the data. Where dream patterns are repeated, the drone’s location will be repeated. Where the EEG readings from different subjects coincide, so will the drones’ flightpaths.

Aashish Gadani, Interactive Installation
Founding artists of the new media company Cold Brew Collective will collaborate with a neuroscientist at the Allen Institute to bring Virtual Reality technology and biosignal measurement system—think FitBit—together to create a virtual experience that is created by one’s own body. The artist will measure brain activity and use that data to alter the virtual world a user is experiencing through the “game.” This experiment will utilize the Virtual Reality experience, which traditionally focuses on removing a human from their real setting and body, to further connect users with their own physical realities.

Robb Kunz, Sound/Performance Installation
Using a house or building slated for redevelopment and currently unused as a setting, Kunzt will create an interior sound installation using powerful sound transducers which transform the walls into speakers, as though the walls are literally talking. This work is a sound exhibition and performance based around the rapid gentrification in Seattle and cities around the world. The artist will engage the neighborhood in contributing their thoughts, feelings, and recorded ephemera for inclusion into the sound design. Using custom performance software and hardware he will weave a sound tapestry with 20 to 30 channels of voices and found sounds emanating from the walls, recounting the memories of the neighborhood before falling quiet.

Here is the full list of Tech Specific grant recipients:

Aktionsart, Black Box 3.0
Bellevue Arts Museum, Atoms+Bytes: Redefining Craft in the Digital Age
City of Auburn, Suzanne Tidwell Interactive Ceiling LED Installation and Workshops
James Coupe, Exercises in Passivity
Thomas Deuel, Encephalophone*Ensemble
Jacob Fennell, Places of Solitude
Aashish Gadani, Interactive Installation
Eunice Kim, Nontoxic Print Making at Cedar River Watershed
Robb Kunz, Sound/Performance Installation
LET’S, We
One Reel, Brent Watanabe at Bumbershoot
Barbara Polster, Kodochrome Mirage
Tracy Rector, Clearwater, People of the Salish Sea
Tivon Rice, Drone Photogrammetry
Fritz Rodriguez, Viola Organista
Ann Marie Schneider, Non-native
Tony Stuart, Making Music While the Sun Shines
Suyama Space, Generativity
Third Place Tech, Electric Sky
Velocity Dance, Dance Film Track

Closing Out 2015 on e4c

Still from Tess Martin’s The Whale Story (2012). Image courtesy of the artist.

The next time you find yourself walking, riding, or cycling past the 4Culture offices on Prefontaine Place South, take a minute to enjoy some of the country’s most dynamic digital art, displayed on our street-facing screens. e4c—or, electronic 4Culture—puts filmmakers, animators, and designers in front of the public, daily from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm. After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c went live again this August with a film by Evertt Beidler.

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Still from Tess Martin's Whale Story (2012). Image courtesy of the artist.
Still from Tess Martin’s The Whale Story (2012). Image courtesy of the artist.

The next time you find yourself walking, riding, or cycling past the 4Culture offices on Prefontaine Place South, take a minute to enjoy some of the country’s most dynamic digital art, displayed on our street-facing screens. e4c—or, electronic 4Culture—puts filmmakers, animators, and designers in front of the public, daily from 7:00 am to 10:00 pm. After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c went live again this August with a film by Evertt Beidler.

Every month, the show gets more robust as we add new work—make sure to visit us as 2015 comes to a close to experience these riveting artists’ works:

 

Tess Martin: Slices in Time (2014), A Walk in the Woods (2013), The Whale Story (2012), and Hula Hoop (2012)

Launched: October 1, 2015

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/35038113[/vimeo]

Tess Martin is an independent animator who works with cut-outs, ink, paint, sand or objects. She is fascinated by how technique can help tell a story, and the process of creation is often evident in her work. Subjects of her films include the brain, human-animal communication, interpersonal relationships and creepy folk songs.

 

Barbara Robertson: Brain Waves (2015), Accumulation (2015), and Adrift (2012)

Launched: November 5, 2015

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/127848484[/vimeo]

Barbara Robertson is known primarily for her work in experimental printmaking, digital animation and sound installations. Three of her animation works will be included on e4c. Each piece is composed of images created by drawing and painting on paper, or by maps and charts which are scanned and imported into an animation program. Sound for these works were created by Johanna Melamed, a sound designer for theatre as well as art videos and installations.

 

Joseph Gray: Aether’s Reverie: Ver

Launches: December 3, 2015

[vimeo]https://vimeo.com/96748402[/vimeo]

Aether’s Reverie: Ver is a variant within a series that explores an algorithmically generated, virtual, sculptural form. Randomness breathes an uncontrolled organic element into the simulacra, while aesthetic choices about lighting, color palettes and camera motion change the sense and mood of the final visualized environment. This video is a recording of the custom software’s output of the Ver version of Aether’s Reverie, aiming for a glowing, misty, vernal and blossoming quality. The original artwork is non-linear and runs infinitely without repeating, being generated in real-time.

 

 

Introducing the 2016 Creative Justice Mentor Artist Cohort

4Culture’s Creative Justice offers an arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, Washington. Through collaboration with mentor artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more equitable justice system for our region.

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4Culture’s Creative Justice offers an arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, Washington. Through collaboration with mentor artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more equitable justice system for our region.

Who are these mentor artists? The cohort changes each year based on the recommendations of a panel made up of professional teaching artists, youth and adult community members, and court representatives. This year’s panel recently convened and selected four incredible individuals that will give life to 2016 programming:

 

King Khazm. Photo © Cahn Nguyen
King Khazm. Photo © Cahn Nguyen

Daniel Kogita
Emcee, artist and organizer Daniel Kogita AKA King Khazm advocates for community empowerment through Hip Hop culture. As a bi-racial, disabled person from Seattle’s South end, Khazm’s story of perseverance is a testament to Hip Hop’s founding principles. He is the Executive Director of the non-profit organization, 206 Zulu Nation as well as the indie label, Fresh Chopped Beats/MADK Productions. Khazm’s commitment to nurturing youth has been recognized by communities around the United States and the world, as well as by dignitaries such as Hip Hop’s Godfather, Afrika Bambaataa, former Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels, and Governor Jay Inslee.

 

Olisa Enrico. Photo © Khadeidrah Cochran
Olisa Enrico. Photo © Khadeidrah Cochran

Olisa Enrico-Johnson
Olisa “Spyc-E” Enrico-Johnson has been rockin’ the mic for over 20 years. Born into a life of music, she began exploring theatre in 2003. She holds a BFA in Performance and an MFA in Theater Pedagogy from Virginia Commonwealth University. Olisa believes that artists and the arts are vital to the state of culture and society and she hopes to share her soul through performance and teaching. A board member of TheConciliationProject.org, she works to promote open and honest dialogue about racism in America through active and challenging dramatic works. Olisa teaches students of all ages and stages. Her teaching, of any subject, incorporates principles of community and shared responsibility.

 

Jamil Suleman. Photo © Aaron Jacob
Jamil Suleman. Photo © Aaron Jacob

Jamil Suleman
Jamil Suleman is a Hip Hop artist, filmmaker, traveler, and teaching artist. Acclaimed in his field not only as an artist and educator, but as a community organizer, Jamil uses music and entertainment to educate and empower people to become the strongest versions of themselves. A passion for creativity, culture, and sustainability, drives Jamil to work with like-minded individuals in the pursuit of a socially just and ecologically equitable world for future generations.

 

Shontina Vernon. Photo © Joanna Degeneres
Shontina Vernon. Photo © Joanna Degeneres

Shontina Vernon
A returning Creative Justice mentor, Shontina Vernon is a storyteller, singer-songwriter, performer, and teaching artist. Her interdisciplinary work fuses live music, poetic narrative, and multimedia to tell the diverse stories of underrepresented communities. She is a National Performance Network touring artist, a recipient of 4Culture’s Art Projects Grant, and a nominated playwright on the Kilroy’s List. Her solo performance piece titled WANTED centers music in a coming of age tale about forgery, fear, and juvenile justice. Shontina’s work has been produced by Seattle’s ACT Theatre, SoloNova, Hip-Hop Theater Festival, and the Central District Forum for Arts and Ideas in collaboration with the Hansberry Project.

 

Aaron Counts will continue in his role as Lead Engagement Artist and Nikkita Oliver, a 2015 mentor artist, will assume the position of Case Manager.