Guest Post: Kent Arts Commission launches Kent Creates

Approaching Storm by John Armstrong – an Inaugural Exhibit Winner

4Culture is opening up shop in Kent, with Hello 4Culture, and we thought it was a good time to check in with Ronda Billerbeck, the Cultural Programs Manager for the City of Kent and Director of the Kent Arts Commission, to see what she’s working on these days. We were excited to learn about one of their new programs, which includes an dynamic way to participate in the arts. We asked Ronda to share her news:

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Approaching Storm by John Armstrong – an Inaugural Exhibit Winner

4Culture is opening up shop in Kent, with Hello 4Culture, and we thought it was a good time to check in with Ronda Billerbeck, the Cultural Programs Manager for the City of Kent and Director of the Kent Arts Commission, to see what she’s working on these days. We were excited to learn about one of their new programs, which includes an dynamic way to participate in the arts. We asked Ronda to share her news:

The Kent Arts Commission is proud to announce the launch of Kent Creates. This web platform for sharing art, culture, and creative endeavors is meant to be a community of imagination and inspiration for anyone who creates or seeks to be inspired by creativity.

Kent Creates is for artists, musicians, writers, crafters, illustrators, dancers, filmmakers, hobbyists, and other creatives to share their work and meet people with similar interests. Creative work of all kinds may be shared on KentCreates.com  – drawings, cartoons, recipes, do-it-yourself how-to videos, short films, and anything else creative minds can dream up.

The project started as a dream to involve and engage the public on a new level. Instead of commissioning an artist to make a piece of art to be passively experienced and enjoyed by the public, Kent Creates encourages Kent residents to be the artists.

We recognized a national trend – Individuals taking a more hands-on role in their participation of arts and culture, and often using technology to that end. Kent Creates is a response to these shifts in the way we generate and consume creative material.

The Kent Arts Commission believes strongly in the power of art to transform the lives of individuals and communities, and that creative pursuits are truly for everyone – not just professional artists. We know Kent – and the larger Puget Sound region – is home to a wealth of creativity including writers, musicians, singers, photographers, filmmakers, and others keeping traditional ethnic arts alive. We are pleased to implement Kent Creates to build connections through showcasing that creativity.

An Inaugural Exhibit was held in October and November of 2015 to launch and test Kent Creates; it garnered 48 submissions including photography, collage, painting, piano composition, poetry and more. The Kent Arts Commission voted on submissions and, in keeping with the Commission’s commitment to pay artists for their work, the top five pieces received $100 honorariums. The winners’ work also appears on the featured carousel on the Kent Creates homepage.

The five winners from the Inaugural Exhibit are: John Armstrong (photography), Mary Ann Cagley (encaustic photo transfer), Jamie Greene (watercolor), Arries McQuarter (piano composition), and Naoko Morisawa (mosaic collage).

The next exhibit for Kent Creates is open January 23 through March 31 and focuses on the theme of “Home.” The call for entries reads:

What does ‘home’ mean to you? In today’s world, many people move far away from the place they were born and raised, to distant cities, states, and countries. As a result, our communities are more diverse with people from varied ethnic, religious, socio-economic, and geographic backgrounds. Despite our differences, home is a common concept, one that elicits strong feelings, memories, and hopes. Is home where you currently live? Is it where you’re from? Is home a place or is it a feeling? Is it a group of people, a memory, or even a period of time? What is HOME?

Work may be submitted through March 31, 2017 – at which time the exhibit will close. The Kent Arts Commission will select the top five pieces, which will receive $100 honorariums and featured status on the site.

Kent Creates is free to use and anyone, anywhere can sign up; there is no requirement to live in Kent.

 

They Come in Threes: Opportunities for Artists

Tess Martin, Part of the Cycle, on view at e4c © 2016 photo Sean Stearns

If you’re an artist interested in unique, outside-the-box opportunities, this September has lots to offer. Whether you have new media work you want to share with the public, need funding for a technology-based art project, or are interested in helping us learn how to better serve artists, make sure these deadlines are on your calendar:

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Tess Martin, Part of the Cycle, on view at e4c © 2016 photo Sean Stearns
Tess Martin, Part of the Cycle, on view at e4c © 2016 photo Sean Stearns

If you’re an artist interested in unique, outside-the-box opportunities, this September has lots to offer. Whether you have new media work you want to share with the public, need funding for a technology-based art project, or are interested in helping us learn how to better serve artists, make sure these deadlines are on your calendar:

Call for artists: e4c 2017 season
Deadline: Wednesday, September 28, 5:00 pm PST

e4c is our highly visible venue for emerging artists to present work in Seattle’s vibrant Pioneer Square neighborhood. Since 2008, more than seventy artists have presented their media artworks to an audience on the move: bus and car commuters, pedestrians, and bicyclists. This call is for independent electronic media artists living in the U.S. and working in all genres. Artworks between 1-5 minutes are desired. Up to 15 artists will be selected to present work for as long as one year, and each selected artist will receive a $500 honorarium.

Artists Up Grant Lab
Deadline: Wednesday, September 28, 5:00 pm PST
Introducing Grant Lab: the grant that’s also an experiment! Through our collaborative program Artists Up, artists of color have given us ideas about how to make our grants more accessible, and now we’re testing them out. By applying, you’ll help us learn how we can improve our programs. Visit our Opportunities page to see the full guidelines, and learn more about Artists Up.

Tech Specific Grant
Deadline: Thursday, September 29, 5:00 pm PST
Calling all makers! Are you working where art and tech collide? Have a project in mind that could use some help getting off the ground? Analog to digital, low-tech to high-tech, individuals to organizations—we’re interested in supporting it all. Learn more about the grant requirements online, and come meet your fellow tinkerers and chat with us about it at an Art + Tech Happy Hour on August 30!

Help Set the SODO Track in Motion

SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

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SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.
SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

We’re kicking off the project in style, and you’re invited. Head to SODO and make this exciting launch event part of your Seattle Art Fair celebrations:

Saturday, August 6, 6:00-9:00 pm
Metropolist, 2931 First Avenue South, Suite A, Seattle
A suggested $20 donation at the door includes two drink tickets (21 and over) and a special guest music performance. See street art in progress on the big screen, enjoy food trucks, find out how you can help out with this project, and more!

The first phase of painting is underway! Artists from Germany, the Netherlands, Los Angeles, Portland, and, of course, Seattle are hard at work in SODO, painting through August 10. Get to know them at sodotrack.com, and get a peek at what they’re each creating for the SODO Track on Instagram by checking out #SODOtrack.

Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.
Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.

If you’d like to join the team, stay tuned to 4Culture this summer for information on a call for artists for a Muralist Roster. This list of pre-qualified artists will be used as a resource to staff projects for the SODO Track and throughout King County. We’ll be taking applications through October! The SODO Track will transform 2 miles of SODO building backs into an international arts destination over the next three summers. Artists from around the world will paint alongside the Pacific Northwest’s best, marking SODO as the creative gateway to Seattle, and making your experience of traveling through the neighborhood so exciting you won’t be able to look away.

Creative Justice Honored with PAN Award

Mentor Artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

We are thrilled to announce that Creative Justice, our arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, has been recognized with a Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review award!

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Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor Artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

We are thrilled to announce that Creative Justice, our arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County, has been recognized with a Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review award!

Piloted in 2015, the program is funded by Percent for Art revenue generated through the design and construction of the county’s new Children and Family Justice Center—which will collocate the region’s juvenile court and jail—and a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Forty eight youth facing criminal charges worked with mentor artists—Aaron Counts, Daemond Arrindell, Nikkita Oliver, Otieno Terry, and Shontina Vernon—instead of being detained. In exchange for their creative work and through partnership with the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, participants received community service credit, cash stipends, and a range of court benefits. Of the 48 participants, 29 had their charges dismissed. King County is now asking that the program be expanded in 2016 and beyond.

Creative Justice is one of 38 outstanding public artworks to be honored by Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education. PAN is the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art. Three of the projects recognized this year were supported by Washington State organizations.

Of the award, Aaron Counts, Lead Engagement Artist for Creative Justice, said:

The Creative Justice team is grateful for this acknowledgement, and so proud of the work we’re doing. The school to prison pipeline is real, and far too many of our youth—most of them black, brown, and poor—are jailed despite major research that shows incarceration does not make communities any safer.

Rather than further stigmatize and isolate young people in crisis, Creative Justice rallies around them, providing creative development through meaningful interactions with supportive mentor artists. But more importantly, Creative Justice has asked our juvenile justice system to behave differently, too: by viewing our youth with a wider lens, trusting the community to address its own needs, and celebrating the strengths and creativity of young people who are trying to navigate a complex world.

Using the power of art to share our struggles and articulate our potential, Creative Justice is building a stronger community here in King County.

Learn more about the program, its impact, and the incredible creative work of our youth at creativejustice.4culture.org.

 

An Evening of Art and Water in Georgetown

Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.

What can artists offer in the context of a city-wide water infrastructure project? Plenty.

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Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.
Sans façon, Fire Hydrant Drinking Fountains: Group, photo courtesy of the artists.

What can artists offer in the context of a city-wide water infrastructure project? Plenty.

King County and Seattle are realizing an ambitious plan to protect the health of our waterways. A complex network of facilities, treatment, and conveyance, King County’s control plan in Seattle is designed to dramatically limit combined sewer overflows—or CSOs—caused by excess stormwater in the sewer system on rainy days. CSOs exist only in older Seattle neighborhoods, where one set of pipes carries both sewage and stormwater. The facilities built in those neighborhoods include a provision for 1% for public art.

…the CSO system is everywhere, it affects us all….miles of pipes, treatment and tanks, networking water around the city—movement and drama underground the mind can barely imagine. This is where artists can excel, expressing big ideas, connections seen and unseen, tapping feelings and emotions, exposing the essence of what it is to be human and relate to the world around us.
-From the CSO Art Master Plan

In March of last year we announced that Sans façon had been selected to develop a CSO Art Master Plan. The plan is now complete and the planning artists are ready to share their recommendations for how art experiences can create an emotional connection to the CSO system for citizens at an event that is free and open to the public. In the first hour, Sans façon will present the CSO Art Master Plan curatorial framework, ethos, and opportunities for commissioned artists. In the second hour, a panel discussion will focus on artists working in the context of water utilities and infrastructure. Join us!

Art + Water at Oxbow in Georgetown
June 16, 2016, 7:00—9:00 pm
6118 12th Avenue South, Seattle, WA 98108

June at Gallery4Culture: Pat De Caro

Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.

Pat De Caro
Foreign Shores
June 2—30, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, June 2, 6:00—8:00 pm

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Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.
Pat De Caro, Foreign Shores, 2016. Charcoal and pastel on Fabriano paper. 28 x 19 ½ inches each. Photo: Otto Greule.

Pat De Caro
Foreign Shores
June 2—30, 2016
Opening: First Thursday, June 2, 6:00—8:00 pm

Pat De Caro presents Foreign Shores, an expansive collection of over eighty charcoal drawings that reflect our relationship to memory and time. Mounted in a narrative grid, extending wall to wall and floor to ceiling, the drawings surround the viewer. They promote meanings and metaphoric connections that shift with emotion, much like light changes according to time, weather, and season.

Rather than limiting the world to singular moments, De Caro’s drawings release us from cartography and encourage us to navigate the waters of our own experience. Her imagery evokes stories passed on, shared and constructed to give expression to a collective consciousness.

“I’m pondering that place between knowing and not knowing, when perception seems real, yet it triggers a vibration in our memory” says DeCaro. “Foreign Shores refers to the edge that defines those waters—waters that are both familiar and mysterious at the same time.”

About the Artist: Pat De Caro’s paintings and drawings have been exhibited throughout the United States and Europe. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Yvonne Twining Humber Award for Lifetime Achievement in the Arts and grants from the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund (NYC), the Ford Foundation, and the Seattle Arts Commission; she also received a Fulbright-Hayes Fellowship in Painting and was a Neddy Artist Award finalist. De Caro has participated in residencies at Pilchuck School of Glass, Ateliers Hoherweg (Dusseldorf), the Ragdale Foundation, and the MacDowell Colony.

Website: patdecaro.com
Up Next: Gallery4Culture will feature Andrew Hoeppner in July.

2016-2017 Season @ Gallery4Culture

The annual Gallery4Culture application cycle closed on January 11th. In mid-February, the selection panel met and deliberated. Beth Sellars, independent curator and co-founder of Suyama Space, and gallery alumni Rodrigo Valenzuela and Kimberly Trowbridge chose ten artists and artist teams for exhibitions beginning this fall and running through July 2017. The artists, listed in the order of their scheduled shows, are as follows:

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The annual Gallery4Culture application cycle closed on January 11th. In mid-February, the selection panel met and deliberated. Beth Sellars, independent curator and co-founder of Suyama Space, and gallery alumni Rodrigo Valenzuela and Kimberly Trowbridge chose ten artists and artist teams for exhibitions beginning this fall and running through July 2017. The artists, listed in the order of their scheduled shows, are as follows:

September 2016: Sylwia Tur’s installation expresses the language of structures, space, and movement. By juxtaposing sculptural objects, primarily in porcelain, she constructs new spatial relationships, accesses memory, and expands perceptual awareness in an attempt to find the meeting point between image and architecture.

October 2016: Brit Ruggirello lives in a house called Blue Hotel. She wants to know why living in a space that she’s named feels different than living in a truly blue environment. Her exhibition explores digital and physical worlds, negotiating between the imagined and the real, with found objects, vibrantly colored light bulbs, pastel gradients, and photography.

Brit Ruggirello. Brit_2, 2015. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, pink sand, Ikea leg, fake flowers, ribbon, office mat, plant, and white vase.
Brit Ruggirello. Brit_2, 2015. Archival inkjet print, wall paint, pink sand, Ikea leg, fake flowers, ribbon, office mat, plant, and white vase.

November 2016: Deborah Lawrence uses satirical collage as a political and psychological tool. Aligned with the 58th quadrennial U.S. presidential election, she exhibits collages – rendered on canvas, paper, board and recycled metal serving trays – that reflect a decades-long interest in social justice.

January 2017: David Jaewon Oh’s Combatants series explores gender identity and gender roles through the documentation of women in combat sports. Large scale photographic portraits of female fighters in their respective gyms, an environment in which they are often the minority, highlight their strength and endurance as well as the changing the face of field.

Oh_D_06
David Jaewon Oh. Jessica, 2015. Digital C-Print.

February 2017: Chris McMullen is fascinated with industrial processes. His interactive installation will challenge viewers, both mentally and physically, as they collaborate to activate a room-filling sculpture. This kinetic engagement is meant to encourage face to face communication and grounding in our increasingly digital world.

March 2017: Deanne Belinoff’s abstract drawings and paintings express ideas about reality and its underpinnings, the vast rotations of solar systems, and the implicit connection of all things in the universe. Her exhibition will feature new works inspired by infinity, gravity and time, revealing her personal relationship with the cosmos.

April 2017: Jackson Baker Ryan, Alex Boeschenstein, and Max Cleary will unveil their newest body of residential real estate products and services. With a vision of a stranger future and a mix of hope, irony and apprehension, they will introduce divergent practices informed by prevailing industry pathologies.

Cleary_M_05
Jackson Baker Ryan. Awarded Multitasker’s Association, Seal of Approval, 2016. Digital collage.

May 2017: Katie Miller’s immersive, site-specific installation captures contemporary life and architecture in Pioneer Square through the lens of the silhouette. Imagery and light become active elements in the creation of three dimensional space, inspiring a visceral shift in perception and awareness and helping to redefine our relationship with our surroundings.

June 2017: Paul Komada’s practice reveals the metaphoric space between painting as object and painting as action. Using chroma-key technology to layer images, he inserts himself into his work and blurs the line between process and performance. Concurrent exhibitions at Gallery4Culture and SOIL – one abstract and one documentary, both consisting of images and sounds of the soon to be demolished Alaskan Way Viaduct – will establish a dialogue between the two venues.

July 2017: Jennifer Zwick presents digital photography and constructed three dimensional vignettes focused on the themes of symmetry and duality. Living space and artifice are of special interest as well; she enjoys the subtle subversion of reality.

4Culture would like to thank all 145 gallery applicants for their interest in exhibiting with us and the panel for their diligence in making the selections. Applicants who were not awarded shows are encouraged to reapply next year. The 2017—2018 Gallery4Culture season application deadline will be Monday, January 9, 2017.

Congratulations to our 2016—2017 exhibiting artists! We look forward to this series of strong, boundary-pushing shows.

Welcome to the New 4Culture Application Portal!

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typewriter

We’re kicking off 2016 with an exciting new technology update! Even though 4Culture has long-since left hard copy grant applications in the past, our online application portal needed a refresh. After many months of research, testing, and feedback, we’re proud to launch our new grants application portal.

Making submitting your grant applications and managing your awards as easy as possible is one of the core ways 4Culture supports cultural happenings in King County. With this update, the portal now features:

  • Streamlined, one-page grant applications.
  • The ability to submit invoices and track payments online—no more paper invoices!
  • Ready access to full grant history and copies of digital contracts.

All of our open grants can be accessed at apply.4culture.org. Whether or not you’ve applied for a 4Culture grant in the past, you will need to register with the new portal—if you are a returning applicant, feel free to reuse your old username and password. Once you’ve registered, you’ll receive an activation e-mail. After that, you’ll be able to login to apply.4culture.org and apply for new grants, download copies of your digitally signed contracts, request payments, and update your profile.

One important thing to note is that all users will need a unique e-mail address, just like when subscribing to Spotify or shopping on Amazon. If you have applied to 4Culture using an address on more than one account, you’ll have to decide which address to use with which account going forward.

Important note for Gallery4Culture applicants: this application has not been moved to our new system. Gallery4Culture applications—as well as all Public Art calls and applications—can be accessed by logging in under “Public Art Calls for Artists + Gallery4Culture” from the application portal landing page.

Please contact Bart J. Cannon at bart.j.cannon@4culture.org or 206 263.1584 with any questions as you use this new tool.