Robb Kunz Receives the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant

Artist Robb Kunz

4Culture, Artist Trust and the Estate of Su Job have just announced local artist, Robb Kunz as the 2015 recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000.

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Artist Robb Kunz
Artist Robb Kunz

4Culture, Artist Trust and the Estate of Su Job have just announced local artist, Robb Kunz as the 2015 recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000.

The grant was developed by Job just before her passing in December 2008 and acknowledges King County artists with a connection to Pioneer Square who “challenge the limits of conductive creative discourse and its effects on our society, pushing the creative act beyond the accepted limits, definitions, or purposes of art while engaging audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex.” Su also wanted her grant to recognize artists who, “incorporate the creative process into a life practice that diffuses the boundaries between professional activities, social responsibilities, and respect for the people that compose the community we all share.”

Robb Kunz is a prolific sound artist and engineer. He creates immersive, often renegade, sonic installations in public places as a way to inspire people to unplug, embrace a deeper sense of listening and connection, and confront social and political concerns.

Robb Kunz, Andromeda Strained, 2012/13, photo: Spike Mafford.
Robb Kunz, Andromeda Strained, 2012, photo: Spike Mafford.

Kunz’s exploration of artifice, acoustics, architecture and place creates a shared experience for unsuspecting audiences. His “sculptures,” handmade electronics and kinetic elements built from repurposed materials, broadcast elaborate and shifting compositions.

Originally from Oklahoma, Kunz was deeply affected by the powerful tornado and air raid sirens that punctuated his life on a weekly basis. They continue to be his primary influence. Upon moving to Seattle, following the 1999 WTO protests, he became a central member of the Infernal Noise Brigade. He is also a member of Degenerate Art Ensemble and founded the Berlin-based group, Alcalica. He teaches, engineers and produces recordings, creates affordable stereo systems and museum exhibits out of reclaimed and surplus parts, and keeps a studio at INSCAPE.

The public is invited to celebrate Robb Kunz on First Thursday, October 1, 2015, 6-9pm in the TK Lofts’ Vandenbrink Community Room: 115 Prefontaine Place South – Seattle, WA 98104. Award presentation begins at 7pm.

About the Conductive Garboil Selection Process
Prior to her death, Su Job chose the inaugural recipient of the Conductive Garboil Grant, Johnathan Heath Lambe. She also established a group of panelists to select the 2009 recipient, Sheri Brown. Panelists have since nominated their successors, according to Su’s guidelines. Kelly Lyles received the award in 2010, Rio Pacific Studio (Jeff Jacobson & Jen Vertz) in 2011, Paul Rucker in 2012, Christian French in 2013, and Jeppa K. Hall in 2014. The grant is administered on an annual basis by 4Culture and Artist Trust with the assistance of Su Job’s personal representative, Lynn Schirmer. More details may be found at www.garboil.org.

 

Apply to Be a Creative Justice Mentor Artist

Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

King County teaching artists: lift up the creativity and imagination of youth and help transform the juvenile justice system as a Creative Justice Mentor Artist!

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Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1
Mentor Artist Shontina Vernon, Session 1, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

King County teaching artists: lift up the creativity and imagination of youth and help transform the juvenile justice system as a Creative Justice Mentor Artist!

4Culture’s Creative Justice is an arts-based alternative to incarceration for court-involved youth in King County. Through collaboration with Mentor Artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions, and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more equitable justice system for the region.

Mentor Artists lead 8-12 week intensive project sessions in a range of disciplines. During these sessions, participants meet twice a week, for two hours to dialogue, create, and share meals. Each session culminates with a youth-produced event in the community.

As we wrap up a transformative pilot year of programming, we are calling for a new cohort of experienced teaching artists to facilitate 2016 project sessions. To learn more, visit our Opportunities page.

Deadline: October 12, 2015, 5:00 pm
Eligibility: Open to professional teaching artists residing in King County, WA
Compensation: $14,000
Apply: 4culture.org/apply

Making Art, for Life

Eunice Kim lives and maintains a studio in the Cascade foothills of Ravensdale, a small town located in Southeast King County. For more than a decade, Kim has been committed to a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that utilizes nontoxic techniques. She is a recipient of a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant. Here she shares a little about the making and presentation of her work. 

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Eunice Kim lives and maintains a studio in the Cascade foothills of Ravensdale, a small town located in Southeast King County. For more than a decade, Kim has been committed to a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that utilizes nontoxic techniques. She is a recipient of a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant. Here she shares a little about the making and presentation of her work. 

Eunice Kim, Porous #22, collagraph with chine collé, 23.5 x 23.5 inches (image) 28 x 28 inches (paper), 2005. Courtesy of the Artist. Eunice Kim creates printmaking plates via her own nontoxic process.  The artist forms, shapes, and polishes dot marks on her matrices--which she likens to miniature sculptures--entirely by hand manually, and prints them in a solvent-free environment.
Eunice Kim at work in her studio. Courtesy of the Artist. Eunice Kim creates printmaking plates via her own nontoxic process. The artist forms, shapes, and polishes dot marks on her matrices–which she likens to miniature sculptures–entirely by hand manually, and prints them in a solvent-free environment.

My printmaking journey began when, as an undergraduate art student, I pulled my very first print off the press.  I was instantly hooked.  Following many years of complete immersion in the medium, however, I was riddled with various allergies, sensitivities, and health issues as a result of exposure to caustic chemicals and solvents commonly used in traditional printmaking processes.  Making art was making me sick, and I found myself at crossroads: find an alternate way of working or give up printmaking.  The latter, of course, was not an option. I opted to take a five-year hiatus from printmaking to detox and regain health,and to find a way to do printmaking differently.

In early 2004, I began my investigation into a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that foregoes the use of hazardous mordants and various organic solvents. Through this research in alternative processes, I arrived at a unique dot-based visual language that is specific to my work and intent, and informed by cultural, personal and formative experiences.

This October, I am thrilled to partner with Davidson Galleries with support from a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant to mount a very special installation of my work produced via nontoxic printmaking techniques. Eunice Kim 2005-2015: Ten Year Survey will showcase nearly 80 select collagraphs from the past decade and present a rare opportunity to view the artworks in one comprehensive setting.  I invite you to come out and join us, take in the show, and perhaps take away a small inspiration for embarking on a safer, sustainable art making journey of your own.

To broaden the impact of this exhibition and ensure availability of my work to the public, two regional institutions–Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington Medical Center, have each received a gift of artwork for acquisition into their permanent art collections.  I can’t think of better or more fitting stewards to entrust my work to, and am honored to be able to support these organizations’ mission to heal and inspire.

Eunice Kim, Tessellation (144-3) #12, collagraph monoprint, 36 x 36 inches, 2012.
Eunice Kim, Tessellation (144-3) #12, collagraph monoprint, 36 x 36 inches, 2012.

Eunice Kim 2005-2015: Ten Year Survey

Opening Reception with the Artist: First Thursday, October 1, 2015, 6-8pm

Exhibition Dates: October 2 – 31, 2015

Gallery Hours: Tues – Sat, 10:00 am – 5:30 pm

Davidson Galleries, Pioneer Square, 313 Occidental Ave. S, Seattle, WA 98104

Free and open to public

 

 

 

Guest Post: Van Wolfe on VanFest 2015, an Open 4Culture Project

Photo by Mitch Barchi

In a region that features dozens of outdoor music festivals every year, Maple Valley’s VanFest is unique. Organized by 21-year-old Van Wolfe, the festival, which took place on August 15, is all about community – it features underground music in an all-ages setting, and profits go to the Maple Valley Food Bank. We helped fund VanFest through our Open 4Culture grant program, which exists to reach people and organizations new to 4Culture, and to fund projects happening outside of Seattle. We checked in with Van to get a recap of VanFest Five:

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Photo by Mitch Barchi
Photo by Mitch Barchi

In a region that features dozens of outdoor music festivals every year, Maple Valley’s VanFest is unique. Organized by 21-year-old Van Wolfe, the festival, which took place on August 15, is all about community – it features underground music in an all-ages setting, and profits go to the Maple Valley Food Bank. We helped fund VanFest through our Open 4Culture grant program, which exists to reach people and organizations new to 4Culture, and to fund projects happening outside of Seattle. We checked in with Van to get a recap of VanFest Five:

VanFest was a resounding success this year! In this fifth year, the vision of bringing the intimacy of DIY music to a large beautiful outdoor environment was realized in full. Being able to bring the community together to see 35 bands on four stages out in the park was an amazing opportunity, and marks the beginning of a full-fledged, year-round effort to bring arts and culture into the forefront of Maple Valley once again.

From the stage that we partnered with KGRG-FM‘s The Post to put on, which featured the best of large melodic rock, to the Tent where we had great hip-hop representation, to the Nicolas Stage, where the band SEACATS performed a talk show instead of a musical set, and everything in between, VanFest showcased a variety of the best music currently being made by and for the young people of the Pacific Northwest. VanFest’s youth access program, providing half price tickets to those in high school or younger, helped make the event more  available to the teenagers of Maple Valley and beyond who might be interested in new and relevant underground music.

All in all, the festival was friendly, fun, affordable, and ran smoothly. 4Culture’s contribution was a major factor in allowing an event like this to run at the level that it needs to, with the quality necessary to really start a movement in the city.

Piper’s Orchard Tours & Call for Volunteers from Artist Shin Yu Pai

Keepsake, part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist

Shin Yu Pai is a poet and photographer whose current work focuses on place-based writing, installation, and public art. She has received two 4Culture Art Projects grants, as well as a Heritage Project Award. She was awarded funding from Art Projects in 2015 for HEIRLOOM, which she shares a bit about with us here.

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Keepsake part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist
Keepsake, part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist

Shin Yu Pai is a poet and photographer whose current work focuses on place-based writing, installation, and public art. She has received two 4Culture Art Projects grants, as well as a Heritage Project Award. She was awarded funding from Art Projects in 2015 for HEIRLOOM, which she shares a bit about with us here.

Throughout this summer, I’ve been working on an ongoing public poetry installation project in the trees of Piper’s Orchard in Carkeek Park. HEIRLOOM is part of Heaven & Earth 7: Propagation, an exhibition of outdoor art curated by Thendara Kida-Gee and David Francis. As part of my project, I am “printing” words on apples using adhesive stencils applied to the fruit that are exposed to the rays of the sun. As apples ripen and the stencils are removed, words are revealed on apples throughout the trees. At the base of the orchard, a sign about the project includes a link to a QR barcode that directs smart phone users to a website where visitors can listen to a recording of a full-length poetic text about Piper’s Orchard set to an ambient soundtrack of sonic recordings made in the orchard throughout the seasons.

My project has faced some challenges in terms of natural and human interventions – ripe apples falling from branches, picking. From day to day, what’s physically on the trees changes – the rapid ripening of apple skins, bug infestations, rot. I never know what I’ll see when I go back into the orchard to work, which has been a very different process than creating for the written page.

This Saturday, I’ll return to the orchard to install the last batch of vinyl stencils for HEIRLOOM. I’d like to invite blog readers to join in the experience. Volunteers will help to install dozens of stencils, but more than that, I’d like to as anyone interested in participating, or seeing HEIRLOOM unfold, to take on the role of “apple stewards” Come back to the orchard every day, or as often as possible, to see the subtle changes in color through the ripening process and capture the experience before the apples fall from the trees or disappear. Send me your photos or post them to Facebook with the hashtags #FriendsofPipersOrchard #shinyupai or #theheirloomproject.

Volunteer work party this Saturday, August 15, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Piper’s Orchard in Carkeek Park, located at 950 NW Carkeek Park Rd. For more information on volunteering, contact City Fruit or Friends of Piper’s Orchard. Or just show up at Piper’s Orchard on Saturday!

Orchard tours and art talk/poetry readings scheduled for Saturday, August 29, 2-3 and 3-4 p.m. Meet at the Environmental Learning Center and wear hiking shoes.

HEIRLOOM is funded with support from Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture and The Awesome Foundation. Recording and production made possible through the Artist Residency Programs at Jack Straw Cultural Center. Find out more.

On e4c in August: Evertt Beidler

Magnesis (video still) by Evertt Beidler © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist.
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

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Magnesis_12072012_041_copy
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c will begin again this August, featuring the work of Evertt A. Beidler. Beidler is a multi-disciplinary artist residing in Portland, Oregon, with work included in private collections across the United States and on public display at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers in Cairo, Illinois, which is the first public commission of his career. Beidler writes, “My work utilizes the production of sculpture and live action as a means of interfacing the realm of the imaginary with the realm of the real. Content for my work is derived from personal experience and employs the traditional format of the ‘self-portrait’ as a means of telling stories that are autobiographical in nature. My most recent works combine elements of film, performance, public art, and the technical aspects of producing a functional sculpture into a single endeavor.”

Beidler’s work will be followed by seven other artists, selected from a pool of 35 applicants from across the United States. We look forward to presenting their work! Check back often to see who we’re featuring, and make sure to catch a glimpse of our windows next time your bus passes through Prefontaine Place South.

 

Conductive Garboil Grant Application Deadline: August 17

Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.
Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

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Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.
Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

Do you push the creative act beyond accepted limits? Do you engage audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex? If you happen to be a King County resident with a significant connection to Pioneer Square, consider applying for the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant. Individual artists and artist teams working in any media or discipline are eligible.

To learn more about the opportunity, visit garboil.org.

Apply: 4culture.org/apply
Deadline: Monday, August 17, 2015

Mobilizing a Collective, Street Art Dream: Phase 1

 

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© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.
© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.

Public Art 4Culture is working to mobilize a collective dream: transform the SODO Busway of building backs into a vibrant street art corridor.

The Corridor, dedicated to bus and light rail, spans 2-miles of 5th Avenue South, between South Royal Brougham Way and South Spokane Street in Seattle’s SODO (South of Downtown) neighborhood. Lined on both sides by building backs, it’s like an uncovered tunnel and the visual point of entry to Downtown for bus riders from South King County, and visitors traveling from SeaTac Airport by light rail. In fact, over 43,000 Metro and Sound Transit riders come into the city with eyes on these walls each weekday!

The potential for street art to transform the SODO Corridor into a vibrant and coherent experience, one that unfolds as one travels through, has been a topic of conversation for some time. A dream shared by local artists, arts administrators, property and business owners, and more. Public Art 4Culture, working in a new way, is providing seed money and project management for what we see as the first phase of building this collective dream: developing a plan.

Enter Gage Hamilton. Hamilton is an artist, art director and curator and co-founder of Forest for the Trees, a Portland, OR-based project now in its third year of spotlighting local talent and bringing in national and international street artists to work in a collaborative setting to produce new work on walls freely accessible to the Portland community. Hamilton was selected from a pool of 7 invited artists (thanks panel of artists and SODO business reps!) for the role of Planning Artist.

Over the coming months, he will survey and inventory the Corridor and work closely with 4Culture staff and a stakeholder group to develop a set of recommendations related to scale, motifs, phasing, community engagement and budget allocations.

I’m excited about the opportunity to extend the work I’ve been doing in Portland, but in a Seattle-specific way, Hamilton explains.

This Corridor offers a truly unique, in-motion viewing experience, and I’m looking forward to working with 4Culture and the many people already involved in this project to create a framework that is specific enough to give guidelines for artwork development and broad enough to empower artists to generate ideas.

We’re excited to launch this first phase of the project, acknowledging that we don’t yet know what the outcome will be. How many walls, how many artists, when, financially backed by whom? All things Gage and team will tackle in the coming months. The coalition-building is in motion and evolving, and we’ll keep you posted.

© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.
© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.

State Support for Creative Justice

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

The program has just received a generous technical assistance grant from the State of Washington’s Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) and the Department of Social and Health Services.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

The program has just received a generous technical assistance grant from the State of Washington’s Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) and the Department of Social and Health Services.

These funds will support a series of trainings for Creative Justice front line staff, key partners and advisers to:

  • increase their knowledge of how to work effectively with youth who have experienced personal, familial and systemic trauma;
  • use skill-based communications with youth to support pro-social behaviors; and
  • support court-involved young people in understanding and taking positive action to address the societal roots of youth incarceration, including poverty, racism, sexism, heterosexism.

Learn more at creativejustice.4culture.org.

 

2015 Conductive Garboil Grant, Open to King County Artists!

Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (photo byWendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (photo by Russell Daniels)

What do Jeppa Hall, Christian French, Paul Rucker, Rio Pacific Studio (Jen Vertz and Jeff Jacobson), Kelly Lyles, Sheri Brown, and Johnathan Heath Lambe have in common? They continually push the creative act beyond accepted limits and they are all past recipients of the Conductive Garboil Grant, the annual, non-restricted award of $3,000 envisioned and endowed by artist Su Job!

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Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (photo byWendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (photo by Russell Daniels)

What do Jeppa Hall, Christian French, Paul Rucker, Rio Pacific Studio (Jen Vertz and Jeff Jacobson), Kelly Lyles, Sheri Brown, and Johnathan Heath Lambe have in common? They continually push the creative act beyond accepted limits and they are all past recipients of the Conductive Garboil Grant, the annual, non-restricted award of $3,000 envisioned and endowed by artist Su Job!

Does your artwork challenge the boundaries of creative discourse too? Do you engage audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex? If you happen to be a King County resident with a significant connection to Pioneer Square, consider applying for the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant. Individual artists and artist teams working in any media or discipline are eligible.

To learn more about the opportunity and Su’s intentions, visit garboil.org.

Apply: 4culture.org/apply starting Monday, July 13, 2015 
Deadline: Monday, August 17, 2015

 

Otieno Terry on Creative Justice

Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

Singer-songwriter, producer, and teaching artist, Otieno Terry, led the 2nd project session of our inaugural year of programming. Otieno believes that music strongly influences the minds of young people and uses his art to inspire positivity, self-confidence, discipline, and healing. From March 23rd through June 10th, he worked with 12 teen participants twice per week as they discovered the history of music in America and their own creative voices through instrumentation, vocalization, and writing.

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice Session 2 was a beautiful experience. Encompassing a large spectrum of emotions, the participants had an opportunity to build relationships and community through conversations about society and their perception of reality. We explored world history from different perspectives, focusing on the black experience, the transition from being African to becoming American, and how it affects us today. We talked about the importance of knowing the past and understanding the power of expression and its influence, particularly through music and social media.

The first few weeks of the session were somewhat quiet and cool, and at times awkward, as most things are in the world of teenagers. However, slowly but surely, their wisdom, talent, and youthfulness began to seep into the space we created together, through conversation, collaboration and improvisation. I started to realize how much potential every single student had, and even their circumstances couldn’t put out the flame of hope and joy that continues to burn honestly and unapologetically within.

When they began to record their work, I found that although their youthful flame burns brightly, joyfully and even carelessly at times, their art reflected their complexities and profound awareness of the world they are a part of. Through their honest expression, I now further understand the power of vulnerability, integrity and persistence. They are living proof that hope is real, that love is real, and that there is a warrior that lives in each of us, ready to fight for what we truly believe in.

I am incredibly grateful and honored to have spent such precious time with these students and in service of Creative Justice. It has strengthened my faith in our community, and I look forward to seeing the beauty and greatness that they will bless the world with going forward.

– Otieno Terry

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero