Kristen Ramirez & 4Culture Honored with National Public Art Award

Kristen Ramirez. Photo: Bob Suh.
Kristen Ramirez. Photo: Bob Suh.

Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, has honored 31 outstanding public art projects created in 2014 through the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art.

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Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, has honored 31 outstanding public art projects created in 2014 through the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art.

Seattle-based artist, Kristen Ramirez is being recognized for her mural, Ebb & Flow, an immersive experience of color and light in the Burke-Gilman Trail’s bustling Wayne Tunnel.

A cyclist zips through Ebb and Flow, under 96th Avenue NE in Bothell. Photo: Ken Lambert, The Seattle Times.
A cyclist zips through Ebb and Flow, under 96th Avenue NE in Bothell. Photo: Ken Lambert, The Seattle Times.

The 230-foot long concrete passageway, once dark and dreary, has been brought to life with blasts of bright yellow, orange, pink, and purple as well as symbols that represent the flora and fauna of the region. Responding to the architecture, Ramirez has created a playful kaleidoscope for trail users to travel through.

4Culture commissioned the project in partnership with King County Parks, engaging more than 40 community volunteers in its implementation.

Congratulations, Kristen!

The mural's design has helped to introduce a sense of openness and expanse, enhancing visibility and public safety in this gateway between communities and natural landmarks. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks.
The mural’s design has helped to introduce a sense of openness and expanse, enhancing visibility and public safety in this gateway between communities and natural landmarks. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks.

 

Homepage photo credits: Kristen Ramirez in front of Ebb & Flow, 2014. Photo © Bob Suh

The Duwamish River, Revealed

City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.
City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.
City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.

Famous for being “Seattle’s Only River”, the Duwamish spans 12 miles from Green River to Elliott Bay. Through the years it has often served as a mirror, reflecting the stories of our changing region. The shores of the river were originally home to settlements of the Duwamish, Muckleshoot, and Suquamish tribes. With the creation of the Montlake Cut in 1916, Black River (a tributary of the Duwamish) drained, displacing the native peoples who relied on it. That same year, the once winding Duwamish was dredged and straightened, its old boundaries masked by infill. Agriculture settled in for some time, eventually being replaced by the bustling industry we see today. Over time that industry has generated so much pollution that by 2001, the area was designated a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.

Famous for being “Seattle’s Only River”, the Duwamish spans 12 miles from Green River to Elliott Bay. Through the years it has often served as a mirror, reflecting the stories of our changing region. The shores of the river were originally home to settlements of the Duwamish, Muckleshoot, and Suquamish tribes. With the creation of the Montlake Cut in 1916, Black River (a tributary of the Duwamish) drained, displacing the native peoples who relied on it. That same year, the once winding Duwamish was dredged and straightened, its old boundaries masked by infill. Agriculture settled in for some time, eventually being replaced by the bustling industry we see today. Over time that industry has generated so much pollution that by 2001, the area was designated a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Duwamish Revealed is a series of outdoor installations, performances and activities happening up and down the river and in the communities that border it. More than 40 artist have come together to produce and present new site-specific works from June through the end of September in 2015. These works celebrate the Duwamish River and its role in place, people, ecosystems, past, present and future.

You can stop by our office to say hello and pick up an official program & schedule. The following projects in Duwamish Revealed were supported by 4Culture:

Study of Time & Motion
Tia Kramer & Tamin Totzke 
The first of a two-part group performance that reactivates the 18 elemental gestures of efficiency and inefficiency created by industrial engineer and researcher Frank Gilbreth. A project of 2015 Site Specific program.

Traces of Obsolesce
Sarah Kavage
An installation allowing you see a glimpse of the past river landscape superimposed upon the same view today. Serving as a reminder that nothing is as permanent as it may seem. A project of 2015 Site Specific program.

Plant 2015
Jordan Monez
Scale replicas of the faux-suburban camouflage built atop Boeing Plant 2 to conceal it from aerial view during WWII. A tribute to the wartime heritage and industry along the river, and a nod to the act of revealing, and concealing, history. A project of 2014 Site Specific program.

Illuminated Ghosts
Nicole Kistler
At-scale representations of old-growth trees native to the Duwamish River basin projected onto the exterior of Industrial buildings along the river.
This project started as part of the 2014 Site Specific program.

Get your hands on the full program, or visit the online map to see many more amazing projects!

Duwamish Revealed is a program of the Environmental Coalition of South Seattle, with additional support from 4Culture, Artplace, Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Port of Seattle, and King County.

Cultural Congress is Almost Here

Cultural Congress © 2013 Robert Wade Photography

Our region is home to a thriving, innovative tech community. While many have talked about its economic, demographic and structural impacts, we rarely have the opportunity to consider how tech both informs and transforms arts & culture. The 2015 Cultural Congress will explore some of those intersections through the theme of art and tech.

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Cultural Congress © 2013 Robert Wade Photography

Our region is home to a thriving, innovative tech community. While many have talked about its economic, demographic and structural impacts, we rarely have the opportunity to consider how tech both informs and transforms arts & culture. The 2015 Cultural Congress will explore some of those intersections through the theme of art and tech.

The conference kicks off on Tuesday, April 28 with a day of fantastic sessions. One highlight is a talk by Susie Lee, artist and CEO of Siren.mobi, an app that focuses on humanizing the online dating space. Lee will discuss the rise of artist as entrepreneur in the digital age, including a personal exploration of the experiences, challenges and rewards of working at the nexus of creative entrepreneurship.

cultural-congress-22apr13-83[1] copy
Cultural Congress © 2013 Robert Wade Photography
Our friends at the Arts & Social Change Symposium are back again this year, with a panel on Wednesday, April 29 titled: Broadening Access and Engaging the Next Generation Through Technology. Moderated by Mayumi Tsutukawa (ArtsWA) this discussion will explore some of the ways technology is being used to engage a diversity of youth in building the next arts and culture frontier. Panelists include: Jonathan Cunningham (EMP Museum), Leah Fishbaugh (TeenTix), David Harris (Hack the CD), Martin Jarmick (DXARTS Doctoral Student) and Joan Rabinowitz (Jack Straw).

On Wednesday afternoon, there will be a 4Culture planned, Pecha Kucha powered session titled: “Culture + Technology: Models for Advancing Community” Featuring a series of short, dynamic presentations on Art, Culture and Technology with stories touching on how innovation impacts inclusion, creativity, relevance, and meaningful engagement. Speakers include: Shelly Farnham (Third Place Technologies), Rex Hohlbein (Facing Homelessness), Tom Ikeda (Densho), Curtis Wong (Microsoft Research) and Aletheia Wittman (The Incluseum).

This is only a sampling of the goodness that awaits you, you can find more at the Cultural Congress website, or go ahead and register if you’re ready to dive in!

2015 Cultural Congress
Tuesday April 28- Wednesday April 29
Seattle Center Armory
305 Harrison St, Seattle, WA 98109 

The Cultural Congress is a conference produced by the Washington State Arts Alliance that invites cultural leaders, artists, and administrators from across Washington State to engage with one another and expand their knowledge through peer dialogue, workshops, and presentations.

Native Artists: You Are Invited!

Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul City of Seattle Portable Works Collection
Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul City of Seattle Portable Works Collection

ARTISTS UP welcomes Native artists, their families and advocates – to a free networking and resource exchange event on Monday, April 20th from 5:30 – 8:30 PM at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center. Artists working in all disciplines including: music, dance, theater, media, literature, traditional, visual and public art are welcome to attend.

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ARTISTS UP welcomes Native artists, their families and advocates – to a free networking and resource exchange event on Monday, April 20th from 5:30 – 8:30 PM at the Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center. Artists working in all disciplines including: music, dance, theater, media, literature, traditional, visual and public art are welcome to attend.

Connect with an amazing group of Native artists including: Peter AliJohn FeodorovRoger FernandesHaila PetersonTracy RectorPhilip H. Red EagleFern Renville, John Romero, Elissa Washuta and Andrea Wilbur-Sigo.

Learn about grants, public art commissions and other opportunities from ARTISTS UP partner organizations: 4Culture, Seattle Office of Arts & Culture and Artist Trust. Gather information from Native artist advocates including ArtsWABurke Museum of Natural History and CultureKim Camara and Native Kulturz, the City of Bellevue’s Art Program and the Seattle Indian Health Board.

Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul  City of Seattle Portable Works Collection
Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph.
Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip)
Photo Credit: Art and Soul
City of Seattle Portable Works Collection

The evening will be graciously hosted by Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center and Director, Andrew Morrison, will provide an art tour of the Indian Cultural Center beginning at 5:30 p.m for those interested. The program will begin at 6 p.m. at which time regional funders and fellow Native artists will share information about grants, commissions, residencies and other opportunities to support creative work.

Light refreshments provided by Off the Rez Food Truck will be served. Art activities for school-aged kids (5 years and older) will be available for parents and guardians requesting this service at registration.

This event is FREE, but please REGISTER via Eventbrite; and if you’re on Facebook, please share the event with your friends.

ARTISTS UP is a collaborative effort by three funding agencies: 4Culture, Seattle Office of Arts & Culture and Artist Trust, to improve and expand capacity and networks for artists in Seattle, King County and Washington State.

We’ve Only Just Begun…

Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

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Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

Writer, musician, actor, and teaching artist, Shontina Vernon is leading the inaugural project session and working with 12 participants to tell their stories through interdisciplinary performance, new media, and poetic narrative.

One by one they trickle in. Some days joyful and engaged, other days frustrated and scared. But always, they come – the young people of my Creative Justice class. And I try – we try – to meet each other with the best versions of ourselves we can muster. None of us comes perfect, but we all arrive (trust a little shaky, BS meters high) curious to learn something new about the world around us.

When the mixture is just right, it happens. Through art, someone is able to say something they’ve never said before… see themselves in ways maybe they’ve only imagined. S/he is proud and valiant, and eager to take the new knowledge and test it outside. But often, I am met with everything from an orchestra of hems and haws to outright stubborn resistance. I take it as a healthy challenge. This is part and parcel of piloting a program like Creative Justice.

I know that the resistance I meet from youth isn’t personal. It has nothing to do with the list of insecurities that may be running on loop in my own head at any given moment. Their resistance is about a fundamental distrust in a system that has never really given them the space to be, has never acknowledged the ways in which they are human, or how the systems of oppression form bars around their lives before they’ve scarcely even had the chance to experience the world outside.

As a mentor-teaching artist, I am tasked with creating the space where these young people who have been silenced by so much can speak freely about their experiences, and share their stories – adding their ideas to the way that we think about our choices and actions. It is at the heart of my social justice practice, this belief that art shapes our cultural stories, and it matters who is represented among the storytellers. This is especially true in the dismantling of our incarceration system.

Today, in class, our stories will be about loss and grief. We are making “descansos,” and discussing violence, death and healthy ways to grieve. It comes out of a rough week. Some of our students and families have had very recent brushes with loss. We will take a moment to honor those who have gone before us. Loss and violence is a real part of what my youth face in their communities everyday. To pretend otherwise is to deny what is true of their lived experience. And forget that they are children. They are afraid. They, like us, are searching for ways to be free, often with no guides.

Art is built for this. It can handle difficult things. What a gift to be able to give them tools, and then listen as they find their way to their own stories. I try to remind them that “in the telling, you rewrite it.”

Already, I can see just how important the arts will be in the transformation of our culture around incarceration and the juvenile justice system. What they have shared is honest, raw, and only the beginning of true reconciliation.

– Shontina Vernon

Artists Up: Native Artists Resources & Networking Event

Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul City of Seattle Portable Works Collection
Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul City of Seattle Portable Works Collection
Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph.
Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip)
Photo Credit: Art and Soul
City of Seattle Portable Works Collection

ARTISTS UP will offer an evening of resources and

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Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph. Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip) Photo Credit: Art and Soul  City of Seattle Portable Works Collection
Moving Forward, 2006 Serigraph.
Shaun Peterson, (Puyallup/Tulalip)
Photo Credit: Art and Soul
City of Seattle Portable Works Collection

ARTISTS UP will offer an evening of resources and

networking for Native Artists

April 20, 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.,

Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center

 

On April 20, a free session to connect Native artists in Seattle, King County and Washington State to key services will be offered by ARTISTS UP partners: the Office of Arts & CultureArtist Trust and 4Culture. The evening is designed to share best practices for individual artists through peer learning, build connections between artists and funders, and demystify funding programs and processes. Artists working in dance, literature, media, music, theater, traditional arts, visual and public art are welcome.

The event will take place on Monday, April 20 at Daybreak Star Indian Cultural Center located at 5011 Bernie Whitebear Way, Seattle, WA 98199. Daybreak Star Gallery Director, Andrew Morrison, will be providing an optional art tour of the Indian Cultural Center beginning at 5:30 p.m. The program will begin at 6 p.m. with an information and networking exchange from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Light refreshments will be served and art activities for school-aged kids (5 years and older) will be available upon registration for attendees who require child care. Artists can register online through April 15.

ARTISTS UP is a unique, collaborative program between Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture; 4Culture, which serves all of King County; and Artist Trust, dedicated to supporting artists throughout Washington State.  Designed to engage under-represented artists, ARTISTS UP has successfully provided Latina/o, Asian, Asian Pacific Islander, Asian American, African, African American and Black artists face-to-face meetings with peer artists and funders over the last two years.

For more information, contact Irene Gómez at 206-684-7310 (M-F, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.). Transportation details: there is limited free parking adjacent to the venue in addition to unmarked spaces alongside the road. The center is also accessible via Metro Bus.

For more information please visit: www.artistsup.org

Creative Justice

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County. Through collaboration with mentor artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration (as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions) and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more just and equitable society.

Research shows that incarcerating youth has little-to-no relationship with reductions in crime in the community. Instead, it increases recidivism, pulls youth deeper into the system, causes additional harm to youth who have special needs or are experiencing mental illness, and greatly reduces youth success in the labor market [1]. King County is actively working to reduce reliance on incarceration in favor of community-based alternatives: the total youth population in secure detention decreased 63% between 1998 and 2014 [2]. However, as the number of incarcerated youth has declined, racial disproportionality has increased: black youth are nine times more likely to be imprisoned than white youth. Community groups continue to press for alternatives to incarceration that work to eliminate systemic racism and its destructive impacts on youth and families of color.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for young people in King County. Through collaboration with mentor artists, participants consider the root causes of incarceration (as they intersect with racism, classism and other oppressions) and focus on the positive role youth voice can have in building a more just and equitable society.

Research shows that incarcerating youth has little-to-no relationship with reductions in crime in the community. Instead, it increases recidivism, pulls youth deeper into the system, causes additional harm to youth who have special needs or are experiencing mental illness, and greatly reduces youth success in the labor market [1]. King County is actively working to reduce reliance on incarceration in favor of community-based alternatives: the total youth population in secure detention decreased 63% between 1998 and 2014 [2]. However, as the number of incarcerated youth has declined, racial disproportionality has increased: black youth are nine times more likely to be imprisoned than white youth. Community groups continue to press for alternatives to incarceration that work to eliminate systemic racism and its destructive impacts on youth and families of color.

We have envisioned Creative Justice to advance the goal of continuing to reduce the use of incarceration while simultaneously eliminating racial disparities. Supported by 1% for Art funds and the National Endowment for the Arts, the pilot year of programming is engaging 48 youth and families involved with King County Juvenile Court.

Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Mentor artist, Shontina Vernon. Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

During quarterly project sessions at partner sites throughout the county, participants meet with experienced mentor artists twice a week, for two hours, to dialogue, create and share a meal. Sessions include: artistic skill building in a variety of disciplines; discussion and learning rooted in principles of anti-racism and social justice; individual and collaborative creative work; and opportunities to give and receive feedback. Family members are engaged in the projects in various ways, including participation in hands-on activities. At the end of each session, youth lead and produce community-based actions and events in which they share their creativity, vision, and new abilities.

The Prosecuting Attorney’s Office is considering involvement in Creative Justice as mitigation in any case and incentive for terminating probation early. As well, youth receive community service credit and stipends that encourage participation while helping to pay court fines and other expenses.

Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

The first 2015 project session is being hosted at 2312 Gallery in Belltown. Twelve young people are working with mentor artist Shontina Vernon to explore the power of personal narrative storytelling as they consider themes of social justice, community, authenticity, and the freedom of choice. Guest artists Tariqa Waters, Amy O’Neal, Nicole Brown, Anthony Tackett, Evan Flory-Barnes, and Hollis Wong-Wear are scheduled to make special appearances.

Otieno Terry, Daemond Arrindell, and Nikkita Oliver will lead future project sessions, all with an emphasis on social engagement, and collaborate with Shontina to make supplementary Saturday drop-in classes available to a larger court-involved population. A full schedule and session descriptions can be found at creativejustice.4culture.org.

Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.
Creative Justice 2015: Session 1. Timothy Aguero Photography.

Lead Engagement Artist and Program Coordinator, Aaron Counts shares his thinking about Creative Justice:

Art can be transformative. I owe my entire writing career to this idea, so it is a belief I hold close. I’ve written poetry and prose with prisoners, school dropouts, gang members and college professors and national book award winners alike, and the common thread among all of them is the desire to be seen and heard, for each of us to have a platform to tell our stories.

For court-involved young people, who are often the most marginalized of voices, that opportunity to be heard usually comes framed as anti-social action. When youth strike out against rules and norms, their negative behaviors become the story. But in Creative Justice, we know they have much more to say, and art can be the conduit that brings those ideas into the center of the conversation.

To stand and say in a beautiful and creative way, “This is the way I see the world. Any questions?” is a powerful experience. It allows us to commune with one another and really begin to hear what each of us is going through, individually and collectively. That sharing of stories is a great place to build empathy and compassion, to forge stronger connections and transform communities.

As an artist and activist, I relish the task of working in a program that focuses on making my community a more equitable place. With Creative Justice, we’re recognizing the power to create in those we’ve often vilified for their ability to destroy. How exciting is that?

 

[1] Justice Policy Institute, 2006
[2] King County, 2014

 

Sans Façon – Tristan Surtees and Charles Blanc – Selected as Planning Artists for Seattle’s CSO System

Potograph by Erin Brooke Burns, avenuecalgary.com
Potograph by Erin Brooke Burns, avenuecalgary.com

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Potograph by Erin Brooke Burns, avenuecalgary.com

4Culture and King County’s Wastewater Treatment Division are excited to announce that Sans Façon has been selected to create the Seattle-area Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Art Master Plan. Sans Façon is a collaborative partnership between Tristan Surtees (English artist) and Charles Blanc (French architect) that was hatched in Glasgow 14 years ago. Surtees likes to tell the story of meeting Blanc, a “handsome Frenchman,” who moved in as his girlfriend’s flat mate. Surtees hung around a lot (making things perfectly clear) and his conversations with Blanc grew into a studio practice that explores the “complex relationship between people and place.” Surtees and Blanc “see the role of artist and art as catalyst in a process of raising questions and inviting one to look and think differently about a place, hoping to create an opportunity rather than inanimate object.”

One of those complex relationships between people and place that Surtees and Blanc have been exploring is Calgary’s Bow River. Embedded in the Department of Utilities and Environmental Protection (UEP) since 2007, the artists have envisioned and led Watershed+, an ambitious public art program that brings creative practice into the city’s work in water management and heightens the emotional connection of Calgarians to the Bow River watershed.

Over the course of the next year, Sans Façon will be crafting a conceptual framework for art integration that places an emphasis on revealing the complex and hidden system and treatment innovations within King County’s CSO control plan. Eleven CSO projects are occurring in Seattle between now and 2030 in the Lake Washington Ship Canal neighborhoods of Montlake, University, Ballard and Fremont and in the south Duwamish River/Elliott Bay area within Beacon Hill/Rainier, Georgetown and Pioneer Square neighborhoods and the industrial lands along the Duwamish.

Photograph by Erin Brooke Burns, avenuecalgary.com

poetry partner thanks

It takes a village. Producing a big public art project takes a village. Especially one that spans across multiple languages and platforms, one that you can find online and on wheels. A public art project that you can experience as you wait for your bus and while riding one.

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It takes a village. Producing a big public art project takes a village. Especially one that spans across multiple languages and platforms, one that you can find online and on wheels. A public art project that you can experience as you wait for your bus and while riding one.

And it takes generosity of spirit. A big imagination and can-do approach on the part of multiple partners coming together to bring a public art project to life.

When it comes to Poetry on Buses – the public art project that invites you to experience a new locally-sourced poem every day for a year – many have shared tremendous generosity of spirit.

titan_smoke
Poetry Bus and Station. Photos by Timothy Aguero Photography

One partner that we’d like to shine a light on is Titan 360. Titan is a full service multimedia company whose passion is “people in transit.” You’ve seen their work on all King County Metro Transit buses, and beyond.

When 4Culture and Metro came to the table to dream big for the return of Poetry on Buses, Titan was right there with us. Helping to think through what the campaign could look like, feel like, and how we could make it happen. Working through a huge amount of back and forth as we finalized the poem selections, graphic design (thank you Somelab!), and placements. When we launched four Poetry Buses – no ads, all poetry – and a poem on each of the 109 other buses in the RapidRide fleet, plus 30 shelter installations!, we did it with Titan’s help and support.

Titan Logo 2014.ai

 

Thanks Titan, and especially Pamela, Ben, Melina, Angie and team, for your partnership.

 

CREATIVE INNOVATION in ACTION

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We were so thrilled to be a part of the first Seattle Pecha Kucha Night on the 1st Art +Technology Pecha Kucha that took place last year. Now it’s back, and better than ever!

Over the last year, many who work in the arts, technology, and sciences in our region have expressed an interest in community building around the areas where these interests collide.  Reflecting this,  PKN SEA vol. 59: Technology + Art: Bridges and Throughways, will bring together pioneering technologists, socially-minded artists, writers, composers, philosophers, and mathematicians to examining the known and unknown bridges which connect the creative community in relevant, sometimes subversive, and revolutionary ways.  Everyone welcome. RSVP on Facebook.

Thursday, January 29, 2015
Cornish College of the Arts
Seattle Center, Leo K Theater
155 Mercer St
Seattle WA 98109
6:00pm – 9:00pm, FREE

List of Speakers:

  • Charlie Levin: Maker of Interactive Art in Oakland United States
  • Lola E Peters: Writer, eLearning Developer, Happily Retired! in Seattle
  • Bronwyn Lewis: Artist, Educator, Community Manager in Seattle
  • Dakota Gearhart: Artist in Seattle
  • Nat Evans: sound artist, composer in Seattle
  • Jason Pace: Executive Director, University of Washington Bothell in Redmond
  • Geraldine Ondrizek: Professor, Reed College in Portland
  • John Boylan:Writer, conversationalist, and networker in Seattle
  • Adriana Moscatelli: CEO , Playworks in Seattle
  • Allison Kudla: Artist, Technologist, Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle
  • Kira Burge: Co-Curator, Interstitial Theatre in Seattle
  • Julia Greenway: Co-Curator, Interstitial Theatre in Seattle
  • Robin Oppenheimer: Instructor, University of Washington Bothell; Cornish College in Seattle
  • Megan Trainor: Artist in Seattle
  • Rebecca Cummins: Artist / Educator, School of Art+Art History+Design, University of Washington

Pecha Kucha Night Seattle events are inspiring and exciting. We hope to see you there.

Vets Restore: 2014 Graduates

2014 Vets Restore Graduation Ceremony, Washington Hall, Seattle © 2014 Brandee Beau Photography
2014 Vets Restore Graduation Ceremony, Washington Hall, Seattle © 2014 Brandee Beau Photography
2014 Vets Restore Graduation Ceremony, Washington Hall, Seattle © 2014 Brandee Beau Photography

We want to take a moment to celebrate the 5 King County veterans who’ve successfully completed the Vets Restore program in 2014. The graduates are U.S military veterans Kevin Bottini, Easton Branam, Zoe Gillespie, Dwight Jones, and Gabriel Jones.

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2014 Vets Restore Graduation Ceremony, Washington Hall, Seattle © 2014 Brandee Beau Photography
2014 Vets Restore Graduation Ceremony, Washington Hall, Seattle © 2014 Brandee Beau Photography

We want to take a moment to celebrate the 5 King County veterans who’ve successfully completed the Vets Restore program in 2014. The graduates are U.S military veterans Kevin Bottini, Easton Branam, Zoe Gillespie, Dwight Jones, and Gabriel Jones.

We had a fabulous ceremony at Washington Hall in Seattle’s Central District on December 10, 2014, with love from 4Culture staff & board, representatives from all of our partners, King County Councilmember Kathy Lambert & Washington State Senator-Elect Pramilla Jayapal.

 

Video produced by Ethan Steinman, Daltonic Films LLC, featuring music by Anomie Bell, this is the third clip in a series that focuses on the veterans and their progress through the program.

Vets Restore is a collaboration between 4Culture, Historic Seattle, and King County Veterans’ Program aimed at providing training, paid internships and career guidance for veterans, in the field of historic building preservation. The program helps those that have served their country find meaningful work preserving the history and character of their local community. We’re happy to report that 3 of the veterans have received paid positions; all of their resumes and bios can be viewed on the Vets Restore website.

A special thank you to our construction industry affiliates this year: Bear Wood Windows, Inc., J.A.S. Design-Build, Rafn Company, Susan Black & Associates and Abacus Fine Carpentry LLC.

The 2015 program is currently under development. For questions, please contact Flo Lentz.