On e4c in August: Evertt Beidler

Magnesis (video still) by Evertt Beidler © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist.
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

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Magnesis_12072012_041_copy
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c will begin again this August, featuring the work of Evertt A. Beidler. Beidler is a multi-disciplinary artist residing in Portland, Oregon, with work included in private collections across the United States and on public display at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers in Cairo, Illinois, which is the first public commission of his career. Beidler writes, “My work utilizes the production of sculpture and live action as a means of interfacing the realm of the imaginary with the realm of the real. Content for my work is derived from personal experience and employs the traditional format of the ‘self-portrait’ as a means of telling stories that are autobiographical in nature. My most recent works combine elements of film, performance, public art, and the technical aspects of producing a functional sculpture into a single endeavor.”

Beidler’s work will be followed by seven other artists, selected from a pool of 35 applicants from across the United States. We look forward to presenting their work! Check back often to see who we’re featuring, and make sure to catch a glimpse of our windows next time your bus passes through Prefontaine Place South.

 

Conductive Garboil Grant Application Deadline: August 17

Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.
Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

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Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.
Jeppa Hall, Queen Shmooquan/Monster Jerry, photo: Russel Daniels.

You have just three weeks to apply for the Conductive Garboil Grant!

Do you push the creative act beyond accepted limits? Do you engage audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex? If you happen to be a King County resident with a significant connection to Pioneer Square, consider applying for the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant. Individual artists and artist teams working in any media or discipline are eligible.

To learn more about the opportunity, visit garboil.org.

Apply: 4culture.org/apply
Deadline: Monday, August 17, 2015

Mobilizing a Collective, Street Art Dream: Phase 1

 

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© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.
© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.

Public Art 4Culture is working to mobilize a collective dream: transform the SODO Busway of building backs into a vibrant street art corridor.

The Corridor, dedicated to bus and light rail, spans 2-miles of 5th Avenue South, between South Royal Brougham Way and South Spokane Street in Seattle’s SODO (South of Downtown) neighborhood. Lined on both sides by building backs, it’s like an uncovered tunnel and the visual point of entry to Downtown for bus riders from South King County, and visitors traveling from SeaTac Airport by light rail. In fact, over 43,000 Metro and Sound Transit riders come into the city with eyes on these walls each weekday!

The potential for street art to transform the SODO Corridor into a vibrant and coherent experience, one that unfolds as one travels through, has been a topic of conversation for some time. A dream shared by local artists, arts administrators, property and business owners, and more. Public Art 4Culture, working in a new way, is providing seed money and project management for what we see as the first phase of building this collective dream: developing a plan.

Enter Gage Hamilton. Hamilton is an artist, art director and curator and co-founder of Forest for the Trees, a Portland, OR-based project now in its third year of spotlighting local talent and bringing in national and international street artists to work in a collaborative setting to produce new work on walls freely accessible to the Portland community. Hamilton was selected from a pool of 7 invited artists (thanks panel of artists and SODO business reps!) for the role of Planning Artist.

Over the coming months, he will survey and inventory the Corridor and work closely with 4Culture staff and a stakeholder group to develop a set of recommendations related to scale, motifs, phasing, community engagement and budget allocations.

I’m excited about the opportunity to extend the work I’ve been doing in Portland, but in a Seattle-specific way, Hamilton explains.

This Corridor offers a truly unique, in-motion viewing experience, and I’m looking forward to working with 4Culture and the many people already involved in this project to create a framework that is specific enough to give guidelines for artwork development and broad enough to empower artists to generate ideas.

We’re excited to launch this first phase of the project, acknowledging that we don’t yet know what the outcome will be. How many walls, how many artists, when, financially backed by whom? All things Gage and team will tackle in the coming months. The coalition-building is in motion and evolving, and we’ll keep you posted.

© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.
© Cyrcle & Gage Hamilton, Chase Dreams, 2014. Zipper Buliding, Portland, OR. Photos by Gage Hamilton.

State Support for Creative Justice

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

The program has just received a generous technical assistance grant from the State of Washington’s Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) and the Department of Social and Health Services.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

The program has just received a generous technical assistance grant from the State of Washington’s Partnership Council on Juvenile Justice (WA-PCJJ) and the Department of Social and Health Services.

These funds will support a series of trainings for Creative Justice front line staff, key partners and advisers to:

  • increase their knowledge of how to work effectively with youth who have experienced personal, familial and systemic trauma;
  • use skill-based communications with youth to support pro-social behaviors; and
  • support court-involved young people in understanding and taking positive action to address the societal roots of youth incarceration, including poverty, racism, sexism, heterosexism.

Learn more at creativejustice.4culture.org.

 

2015 Conductive Garboil Grant, Open to King County Artists!

Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (photo byWendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (photo by Russell Daniels)

What do Jeppa Hall, Christian French, Paul Rucker, Rio Pacific Studio (Jen Vertz and Jeff Jacobson), Kelly Lyles, Sheri Brown, and Johnathan Heath Lambe have in common? They continually push the creative act beyond accepted limits and they are all past recipients of the Conductive Garboil Grant, the annual, non-restricted award of $3,000 envisioned and endowed by artist Su Job!

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Past Recipients Paul Rucker (Photo by Wendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (Photo by Russell Daniels)
Past Recipients Paul Rucker (photo byWendy Johnson), Christian French, and Jeppa Hall (photo by Russell Daniels)

What do Jeppa Hall, Christian French, Paul Rucker, Rio Pacific Studio (Jen Vertz and Jeff Jacobson), Kelly Lyles, Sheri Brown, and Johnathan Heath Lambe have in common? They continually push the creative act beyond accepted limits and they are all past recipients of the Conductive Garboil Grant, the annual, non-restricted award of $3,000 envisioned and endowed by artist Su Job!

Does your artwork challenge the boundaries of creative discourse too? Do you engage audiences outside the aesthetic industrial complex? If you happen to be a King County resident with a significant connection to Pioneer Square, consider applying for the 2015 Conductive Garboil Grant. Individual artists and artist teams working in any media or discipline are eligible.

To learn more about the opportunity and Su’s intentions, visit garboil.org.

Apply: 4culture.org/apply starting Monday, July 13, 2015 
Deadline: Monday, August 17, 2015

 

Otieno Terry on Creative Justice

Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

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Creative Justice is 4Culture’s new arts-based alternative to incarceration for King County youth.

Singer-songwriter, producer, and teaching artist, Otieno Terry, led the 2nd project session of our inaugural year of programming. Otieno believes that music strongly influences the minds of young people and uses his art to inspire positivity, self-confidence, discipline, and healing. From March 23rd through June 10th, he worked with 12 teen participants twice per week as they discovered the history of music in America and their own creative voices through instrumentation, vocalization, and writing.

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

Creative Justice Session 2 was a beautiful experience. Encompassing a large spectrum of emotions, the participants had an opportunity to build relationships and community through conversations about society and their perception of reality. We explored world history from different perspectives, focusing on the black experience, the transition from being African to becoming American, and how it affects us today. We talked about the importance of knowing the past and understanding the power of expression and its influence, particularly through music and social media.

The first few weeks of the session were somewhat quiet and cool, and at times awkward, as most things are in the world of teenagers. However, slowly but surely, their wisdom, talent, and youthfulness began to seep into the space we created together, through conversation, collaboration and improvisation. I started to realize how much potential every single student had, and even their circumstances couldn’t put out the flame of hope and joy that continues to burn honestly and unapologetically within.

When they began to record their work, I found that although their youthful flame burns brightly, joyfully and even carelessly at times, their art reflected their complexities and profound awareness of the world they are a part of. Through their honest expression, I now further understand the power of vulnerability, integrity and persistence. They are living proof that hope is real, that love is real, and that there is a warrior that lives in each of us, ready to fight for what we truly believe in.

I am incredibly grateful and honored to have spent such precious time with these students and in service of Creative Justice. It has strengthened my faith in our community, and I look forward to seeing the beauty and greatness that they will bless the world with going forward.

– Otieno Terry

Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero
Otieno Terry, Creative Justice Mentor Artist, Session 2, 2015. Photo: Tim Aguero

Kristen Ramirez & 4Culture Honored with National Public Art Award

Kristen Ramirez. Photo: Bob Suh.
Kristen Ramirez. Photo: Bob Suh.

Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, has honored 31 outstanding public art projects created in 2014 through the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art.

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Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading nonprofit organization for advancing the arts and arts education, has honored 31 outstanding public art projects created in 2014 through the Public Art Network (PAN) Year in Review program, the only national program that specifically celebrates the most compelling public art.

Seattle-based artist, Kristen Ramirez is being recognized for her mural, Ebb & Flow, an immersive experience of color and light in the Burke-Gilman Trail’s bustling Wayne Tunnel.

A cyclist zips through Ebb and Flow, under 96th Avenue NE in Bothell. Photo: Ken Lambert, The Seattle Times.
A cyclist zips through Ebb and Flow, under 96th Avenue NE in Bothell. Photo: Ken Lambert, The Seattle Times.

The 230-foot long concrete passageway, once dark and dreary, has been brought to life with blasts of bright yellow, orange, pink, and purple as well as symbols that represent the flora and fauna of the region. Responding to the architecture, Ramirez has created a playful kaleidoscope for trail users to travel through.

4Culture commissioned the project in partnership with King County Parks, engaging more than 40 community volunteers in its implementation.

Congratulations, Kristen!

The mural's design has helped to introduce a sense of openness and expanse, enhancing visibility and public safety in this gateway between communities and natural landmarks. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks.
The mural’s design has helped to introduce a sense of openness and expanse, enhancing visibility and public safety in this gateway between communities and natural landmarks. Photo: Eli Brownell, King County Parks.

 

Homepage photo credits: Kristen Ramirez in front of Ebb & Flow, 2014. Photo © Bob Suh

The Duwamish River, Revealed

City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.
City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.
City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.

Famous for being “Seattle’s Only River”, the Duwamish spans 12 miles from Green River to Elliott Bay. Through the years it has often served as a mirror, reflecting the stories of our changing region. The shores of the river were originally home to settlements of the Duwamish, Muckleshoot, and Suquamish tribes. With the creation of the Montlake Cut in 1916, Black River (a tributary of the Duwamish) drained, displacing the native peoples who relied on it. That same year, the once winding Duwamish was dredged and straightened, its old boundaries masked by infill. Agriculture settled in for some time, eventually being replaced by the bustling industry we see today. Over time that industry has generated so much pollution that by 2001, the area was designated a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

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City Meditation Crew, a fictitious municipal department, paddles the Duwamish River. Photo courtesy of the City Meditation Crew.

Famous for being “Seattle’s Only River”, the Duwamish spans 12 miles from Green River to Elliott Bay. Through the years it has often served as a mirror, reflecting the stories of our changing region. The shores of the river were originally home to settlements of the Duwamish, Muckleshoot, and Suquamish tribes. With the creation of the Montlake Cut in 1916, Black River (a tributary of the Duwamish) drained, displacing the native peoples who relied on it. That same year, the once winding Duwamish was dredged and straightened, its old boundaries masked by infill. Agriculture settled in for some time, eventually being replaced by the bustling industry we see today. Over time that industry has generated so much pollution that by 2001, the area was designated a Superfund site by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Duwamish Revealed is a series of outdoor installations, performances and activities happening up and down the river and in the communities that border it. More than 40 artist have come together to produce and present new site-specific works from June through the end of September in 2015. These works celebrate the Duwamish River and its role in place, people, ecosystems, past, present and future.

You can stop by our office to say hello and pick up an official program & schedule. The following projects in Duwamish Revealed were supported by 4Culture:

Study of Time & Motion
Tia Kramer & Tamin Totzke 
The first of a two-part group performance that reactivates the 18 elemental gestures of efficiency and inefficiency created by industrial engineer and researcher Frank Gilbreth. A project of 2015 Site Specific program.

Traces of Obsolesce
Sarah Kavage
An installation allowing you see a glimpse of the past river landscape superimposed upon the same view today. Serving as a reminder that nothing is as permanent as it may seem. A project of 2015 Site Specific program.

Plant 2015
Jordan Monez
Scale replicas of the faux-suburban camouflage built atop Boeing Plant 2 to conceal it from aerial view during WWII. A tribute to the wartime heritage and industry along the river, and a nod to the act of revealing, and concealing, history. A project of 2014 Site Specific program.

Illuminated Ghosts
Nicole Kistler
At-scale representations of old-growth trees native to the Duwamish River basin projected onto the exterior of Industrial buildings along the river.
This project started as part of the 2014 Site Specific program.

Get your hands on the full program, or visit the online map to see many more amazing projects!

Duwamish Revealed is a program of the Environmental Coalition of South Seattle, with additional support from 4Culture, Artplace, Seattle Office of Arts & Culture, Port of Seattle, and King County.