Welcome New Touring Arts Roster Performers!

The Seattle Women’s Steel Pan Project at the Global Dance Party 2014. The group was added to the Touring Arts Roster this year. Photo: Oriana Estrada.

The 4Culture Touring Arts Roster celebrates its 30th year by adding more new artists than ever to this listing of the region’s best performers! The Roster, which began in 1985 as a printed brochure and is now an interactive online tool, puts performers of all disciplines – music, theater, spoken word, and more – in direct contact with those looking to bring engaging art to their event.

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Global Dance Party 2014
The Seattle Women’s Steel Pan Project at the Global Dance Party 2014. The group was added to the Touring Arts Roster this year. Photo: Oriana Estrada.

The 4Culture Touring Arts Roster celebrates its 30th year by adding more new artists than ever to this listing of the region’s best performers! The Roster, which began in 1985 as a printed brochure and is now an interactive online tool, puts performers of all disciplines – music, theater, spoken word, and more – in direct contact with those looking to bring engaging art to their event.

On August 23 and 24, dozens of performers and groups took the stage at the Carco Theatre in Renton to audition for a spot on the Roster. A panel of music and performing arts community members lent their expertise to the auditions, and ultimately awarded spots to 23 new performers and groups. We welcome them all to the Roster and look forward to seeing them perform throughout King County! Connect with 4Culture on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to find out where and when you can see them.

Aaron J. Shay Genre fiction-inspired folk storytelling

Acrobatic Conundrum Seattle’s premier contemporary circus company

Amontaine Aurore Theatrical storytelling with dance and music

Apex Aerial Arts Aerial dance company

Black Stax “Stacking” all forms of black music

CHOROLOCO Vintage Brazilian jazz circa the 1920s

Cuadro Azahares Flamenco music and dance

Daana Quartet Classical string quartet

James Walls/The Barrelhouse Jive Cats Old-time swing

Jim Page Seattle folk music balladeer legend

Judd Wasserman Folk, blues, and country powerhouse

“LaRue” (JaWaan LaRue) Positive, conscious, lyricist

Little Sara and the NightOwls Classic soul and blues

Mikey Mike The Rad Scientist Science and nature music for all ages

Recess Monkey High-energy, hysterical, and eclectic songs for all

Rodger Pegues Free jazz piano

Roger Fernandes Storyteller of the Puget Salish tribes

The Rootsters Roots-based Americana duo

The Seattle Women’s Steel Pan Project All-women Caribbean steel pan music and dance

Sharon Nyree Williams Storyteller through various genres

Tudo Beleza Brazilian samba music and dance

Urvasi Dance Ensemble Classical Indian odissi dance

Naomi Wachira Afro-folk singer songwriter

Making Art, for Life

Eunice Kim lives and maintains a studio in the Cascade foothills of Ravensdale, a small town located in Southeast King County. For more than a decade, Kim has been committed to a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that utilizes nontoxic techniques. She is a recipient of a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant. Here she shares a little about the making and presentation of her work. 

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Eunice Kim lives and maintains a studio in the Cascade foothills of Ravensdale, a small town located in Southeast King County. For more than a decade, Kim has been committed to a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that utilizes nontoxic techniques. She is a recipient of a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant. Here she shares a little about the making and presentation of her work. 

Eunice Kim, Porous #22, collagraph with chine collé, 23.5 x 23.5 inches (image) 28 x 28 inches (paper), 2005. Courtesy of the Artist. Eunice Kim creates printmaking plates via her own nontoxic process.  The artist forms, shapes, and polishes dot marks on her matrices--which she likens to miniature sculptures--entirely by hand manually, and prints them in a solvent-free environment.
Eunice Kim at work in her studio. Courtesy of the Artist. Eunice Kim creates printmaking plates via her own nontoxic process. The artist forms, shapes, and polishes dot marks on her matrices–which she likens to miniature sculptures–entirely by hand manually, and prints them in a solvent-free environment.

My printmaking journey began when, as an undergraduate art student, I pulled my very first print off the press.  I was instantly hooked.  Following many years of complete immersion in the medium, however, I was riddled with various allergies, sensitivities, and health issues as a result of exposure to caustic chemicals and solvents commonly used in traditional printmaking processes.  Making art was making me sick, and I found myself at crossroads: find an alternate way of working or give up printmaking.  The latter, of course, was not an option. I opted to take a five-year hiatus from printmaking to detox and regain health,and to find a way to do printmaking differently.

In early 2004, I began my investigation into a safer, sustainable approach to printmaking that foregoes the use of hazardous mordants and various organic solvents. Through this research in alternative processes, I arrived at a unique dot-based visual language that is specific to my work and intent, and informed by cultural, personal and formative experiences.

This October, I am thrilled to partner with Davidson Galleries with support from a 2015 4Culture Art Projects grant to mount a very special installation of my work produced via nontoxic printmaking techniques. Eunice Kim 2005-2015: Ten Year Survey will showcase nearly 80 select collagraphs from the past decade and present a rare opportunity to view the artworks in one comprehensive setting.  I invite you to come out and join us, take in the show, and perhaps take away a small inspiration for embarking on a safer, sustainable art making journey of your own.

To broaden the impact of this exhibition and ensure availability of my work to the public, two regional institutions–Swedish Medical Center and University of Washington Medical Center, have each received a gift of artwork for acquisition into their permanent art collections.  I can’t think of better or more fitting stewards to entrust my work to, and am honored to be able to support these organizations’ mission to heal and inspire.

Eunice Kim, Tessellation (144-3) #12, collagraph monoprint, 36 x 36 inches, 2012.
Eunice Kim, Tessellation (144-3) #12, collagraph monoprint, 36 x 36 inches, 2012.

Eunice Kim 2005-2015: Ten Year Survey

Opening Reception with the Artist: First Thursday, October 1, 2015, 6-8pm

Exhibition Dates: October 2 – 31, 2015

Gallery Hours: Tues – Sat, 10:00 am – 5:30 pm

Davidson Galleries, Pioneer Square, 313 Occidental Ave. S, Seattle, WA 98104

Free and open to public

 

 

 

Close to $4 million in Grants for 2015

From left to right: Yosh Nakagawa, People of Central District project, photo by Madeline Crowley; visitors to the Do You Know Bruce? exhibit at the Wing Luke Museum; the North Bend Theater.

As summer comes to a close, we’re taking a moment to look at and share what our Arts, Heritage and Preservation departments have funded during the first half of 2015. 4Culture staff are proud to administer grant programs that support the critical role culture plays in defining our region.

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From left to right: Yosh Nakagawa, People of Central District project photo by Madeline Crowley, visitors to the Do You Know Bruce? exhibit at the Wing Luke Museum, the North Bend Theater.
From left to right: Yosh Nakagawa, People of Central District project, photo by Madeline Crowley; visitors to the Do You Know Bruce? exhibit at the Wing Luke Museum; the North Bend Theater.

As summer comes to a close, we’re taking a moment to look at and share what our Arts, Heritage and Preservation departments have funded during the first half of 2015. 4Culture staff are proud to administer grant programs that support the critical role culture plays in defining our region.

Here’s the breakdown:

The year isn’t over yet! The September 9 deadline is right around the corner for Building for Culture, our biggest cultural facility grant yet, as well as Tech-Specific, the recent incarnation of the Site Specific program. Applications for that program are due October 15.

Keep up-to-date on grant opportunities through our e-news and website, and by following us on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

Piper’s Orchard Tours & Call for Volunteers from Artist Shin Yu Pai

Keepsake, part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist

Shin Yu Pai is a poet and photographer whose current work focuses on place-based writing, installation, and public art. She has received two 4Culture Art Projects grants, as well as a Heritage Project Award. She was awarded funding from Art Projects in 2015 for HEIRLOOM, which she shares a bit about with us here.

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Keepsake part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist
Keepsake, part of the HEIRLOOM project by Shin Yu Pai. Courtesy of the Artist

Shin Yu Pai is a poet and photographer whose current work focuses on place-based writing, installation, and public art. She has received two 4Culture Art Projects grants, as well as a Heritage Project Award. She was awarded funding from Art Projects in 2015 for HEIRLOOM, which she shares a bit about with us here.

Throughout this summer, I’ve been working on an ongoing public poetry installation project in the trees of Piper’s Orchard in Carkeek Park. HEIRLOOM is part of Heaven & Earth 7: Propagation, an exhibition of outdoor art curated by Thendara Kida-Gee and David Francis. As part of my project, I am “printing” words on apples using adhesive stencils applied to the fruit that are exposed to the rays of the sun. As apples ripen and the stencils are removed, words are revealed on apples throughout the trees. At the base of the orchard, a sign about the project includes a link to a QR barcode that directs smart phone users to a website where visitors can listen to a recording of a full-length poetic text about Piper’s Orchard set to an ambient soundtrack of sonic recordings made in the orchard throughout the seasons.

My project has faced some challenges in terms of natural and human interventions – ripe apples falling from branches, picking. From day to day, what’s physically on the trees changes – the rapid ripening of apple skins, bug infestations, rot. I never know what I’ll see when I go back into the orchard to work, which has been a very different process than creating for the written page.

This Saturday, I’ll return to the orchard to install the last batch of vinyl stencils for HEIRLOOM. I’d like to invite blog readers to join in the experience. Volunteers will help to install dozens of stencils, but more than that, I’d like to as anyone interested in participating, or seeing HEIRLOOM unfold, to take on the role of “apple stewards” Come back to the orchard every day, or as often as possible, to see the subtle changes in color through the ripening process and capture the experience before the apples fall from the trees or disappear. Send me your photos or post them to Facebook with the hashtags #FriendsofPipersOrchard #shinyupai or #theheirloomproject.

Volunteer work party this Saturday, August 15, from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. at Piper’s Orchard in Carkeek Park, located at 950 NW Carkeek Park Rd. For more information on volunteering, contact City Fruit or Friends of Piper’s Orchard. Or just show up at Piper’s Orchard on Saturday!

Orchard tours and art talk/poetry readings scheduled for Saturday, August 29, 2-3 and 3-4 p.m. Meet at the Environmental Learning Center and wear hiking shoes.

HEIRLOOM is funded with support from Seattle’s Office of Arts & Culture and The Awesome Foundation. Recording and production made possible through the Artist Residency Programs at Jack Straw Cultural Center. Find out more.

Poetry on Buses Reading at 5th Annual Celebrate Little Saigon

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CLS2015_Poster_Design_ENGFinal-01

August 22, 2015, 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
1200 S Jackson St
Poetry reading at 12:30 pm

The 2014 Poetry on Buses program began as an open invitation to explore the poetry of home — on the bus, online, and in the community. “What does ‘Writing Home’ mean to you?,” we asked. We wanted to hear from diverse communities here in King County, and held an open call for poetry in English, Russian, Somali, Spanish and Vietnamese. The community responded, and as a result, the Writing Home collection of 365 poems is incredibly rich and varied.

Later this month, the Poetry on Buses Roadshow continues, and we get the opportunity to highlight one community in particular: our Vietnamese poets.

A group of artists will be reading their work for Poetry on Buses in Vietnamese at the 5th annual Celebrate Little Saigon festival in the International District, an outdoor summer festival celebrating Vietnamese-American food, arts, culture, and community held in Seattle’s Little Saigon. The poets will take the main stage at 12:30 pm—come listen to them read their poems in the language in which they were written! Make sure to also stop by the 4Culture festival booth to learn more about Poetry on Buses and all 4Culture community programming.

4Culture would like to thank our Vietnamese Community Liaisons, Anh Phan and Khang Do, for making this project possible, and for helping share the poetic work of this vibrant community. More information about the 5th annual Celebrate Little Saigon festival is available online. We’ll see you there!

Poetry on Buses is launching a new poem every day for a year through November 9, 2015, at poetryonbuses.org. Special thanks to our media sponsor of this Poetry on Buses Roadshow stop KUOW 94.9.

 

Saving Landmarks: Bond-Funded Support for Culture Includes Historic Preservation

Exterior repainting project, Fall City Masonic Lodge #66
Exterior repainting project, Fall City Masonic Lodge #66
Exterior repainting project, Fall City Masonic Lodge #66

There’s new money for old buildings in King County. A portion of King County’s recently announced BUILDING FOR CULTURE investment in our local cultural infrastructure will be dedicated to rejuvenating historic places. Stewards of designated landmark sites and structures can apply to 4Culture’s Saving Landmarks program for help with major rehabilitation or acquisition. Awards will range between $30,000 and $250,000.

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Exterior repainting project, Fall City Masonic Lodge #66
Exterior repainting project, Fall City Masonic Lodge #66

There’s new money for old buildings in King County. A portion of King County’s recently announced BUILDING FOR CULTURE investment in our local cultural infrastructure will be dedicated to rejuvenating historic places. Stewards of designated landmark sites and structures can apply to 4Culture’s Saving Landmarks program for help with major rehabilitation or acquisition. Awards will range between $30,000 and $250,000.

What’s different about this particular grant from our concurrent Arts or Heritage Facilities grants? Under Saving Landmarks, the type of USE or OWNERSHIP of the property doesn’t matter. You don’t have to be a history museum or theatre company. You might be a private individual, or a parks department, or a social service organization. Your landmark property might be a residence, a vessel, a commercial block, or a community hall. As long as it’s a designated landmark within a city or unincorporated area of King County, you can apply. Get more details in the program guidelines.

Strong applications will:

  • Involve major rehabilitation, not routine minor maintenance – budgets must be at least $60,000.
  • Offer public benefit in the form of accessibility, visibility, or economic stimulus.
  • Be shovel ready or already underway, with solid pre-planning.
  • Show a one-to-one cash match (either spent over the previous year or in hand), or a credible plan to raise the match.

Saving Landmarks – it’s a great opportunity to protect community identity in the face of rapid change all around us, and a great way to extend the life of a landmark property for future generations.

To find out more, see the program guidelines or attend one of our workshops:

All workshops are 12:00 – 1:30 pm.

Seattle 4Culture Offices
July 21 + 28
August 4, 11, 18 + 25
September 1

Redmond Redmond Library conference room: July 30
Burien Burien Library conference room: August 6
Shoreline Shoreline Library small meeting room: August 13
Renton Renton Highlands Library meeting room: August 20

A Challenge from Artist Gabriela Denise Frank

Ugly Me by Gabriela Denise Frank © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist
Artist Gabriela Denise Frank as a young girl. © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist

Gabriela Denise Frank, is a multi-disciplinary artist whose current work focuses on topics including identity, family, self-image and aging. She is a 2014 and 2015 4Culture Art Projects recipient and we asked her to share a bit about her latest entitled, Ugly Me.

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Artist Gabriela Denise Frank as a young girl. © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist
Artist Gabriela Denise Frank as a young girl. © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist

Gabriela Denise Frank, is a multi-disciplinary artist whose current work focuses on topics including identity, family, self-image and aging. She is a 2014 and 2015 4Culture Art Projects recipient and we asked her to share a bit about her latest entitled, Ugly Me.

Summer is when we loosen up, let down our hair, and in that regard, I have embraced the summer of 2015 like no other. Earlier this month, I opened a multi-media sound installation called UGLY ME at Jack Straw New Media Gallery in which I’ve let fall all pretense and propriety —no hiding behind makeup or bulky winter clothing— in the hopes of exploring the relationship between appearance and self-worth.

The idea for UGLY ME came about in 2013 (more about that here) though my struggles with self-esteem and identity began decades before. Little did I know when I proposed the installation to 4Culture and Jack Straw that my quest for self-knowledge would lead into dark and funny places, that I would draw upon the slings and arrows of childhood as much as the fashion of the 70s, 80s and 90s which, even now, influences my (ahem) modern wardrobe? Fashion photography, large-scale collage, distorted selfies and twelve original prose poems recorded at Jack Straw come together to tell a larger story about the link between a person’s insides and her outsides.

In preparing for this Friday’s artist talk, I realized how the self-image we create as kids becomes deeply entrenched in our self-understanding as adults—and why we need people throughout our lives to remind us that we’re better than we think we are. UGLY ME teaches the importance of mentorship, especially for young people, as they take creative risks and embrace the unknown landscape of growth and maturity, both as humans and artists. We need boosters equally to nurture us and push us into uncomfortable territory; their encouragement helps to light alternate pathways that we might otherwise not have dared. These artist-mentors inspire our bravery, spark our curiosity, spur our sense of adventure. They are the electrons that trigger quantum leaps that change the world.

In a time when an arts career is equated with a shaky economic future, when financial security is considered more valuable than creativity—when we feel we have to compromise a stable life for doing what we love— I would challenge everyone to act now in order to create a different future. Talk to your children about their creative interests. Encourage them to pursue untrodden roads. Rather than squash the validity of a career in the arts, let young people play and explore; if you don’t know how, then connect them with resources like 4Culture who can help them grow.

Education is training for life, not only a paycheck. Challenge the young artists in your care to define how their art is relevant to the world even if you can’t. Over time, they will be able to tell you how learning to write stories and play music influenced the ingenuity they bring to everything else. We will thank them, and you, for it later.

The goal of living isn’t perfection or innumerable wealth; it’s not about avoiding failure, either. Life is about learning and art is means of reflection on that learning, a way to understand the universe and our role in it, a means of inspiring innovation in a multitude of fields.

At its best, art makes the world a bigger and more meaningful place; it connects us to each other. For projects like UGLY ME, then, the ultimate purpose of art is transformation—often in ways that we can’t foretell at the start. Like all summertime road trips, isn’t that part of the fun?

Ugly Me by Gabriela Denise Frank © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist
Ugly Me by Gabriela Denise Frank © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist

Artist talk this Friday, July 31 at 7 pm at Jack Straw Cultural Center.

UGLY ME Installation Dates

July 10 to August 14

Jack Straw Cultural Center

4261 Roosevelt Way NE, Seattle, WA 98105

FREE

For more information, www.gabrieladenisefrank.com and www.jackstraw.org

On e4c in August: Evertt Beidler

Magnesis (video still) by Evertt Beidler © 2015 Courtesy of the Artist.
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

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Magnesis_12072012_041_copy
© 2015 Evertt Beidler, Magnesis (video still), Courtesy of the Artist

King County Metro Transit estimates that more than 20,000 people travel on our block, Prefontaine Place South, every day. We think they all deserve to see some great art as they pass by our windows, and we also think it’s a perfect opportunity to showcase some fascinating work by artists – enter e4c. Since 2008, e4c – or, Electronic 4Culture – has been a storefront venue for the exhibition of dynamic, electronic artworks, visible by foot, bike, car or bus. Through an open call, artists across the United States, working in all genres including documentary, animation and experimental media, have been invited to apply to participate in the e4c program. To date, more than 70 artists and teams have presented media artworks on e4c.

After a brief hiatus to complete a technology update and screen reconfiguration, e4c will begin again this August, featuring the work of Evertt A. Beidler. Beidler is a multi-disciplinary artist residing in Portland, Oregon, with work included in private collections across the United States and on public display at the confluence of the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers in Cairo, Illinois, which is the first public commission of his career. Beidler writes, “My work utilizes the production of sculpture and live action as a means of interfacing the realm of the imaginary with the realm of the real. Content for my work is derived from personal experience and employs the traditional format of the ‘self-portrait’ as a means of telling stories that are autobiographical in nature. My most recent works combine elements of film, performance, public art, and the technical aspects of producing a functional sculpture into a single endeavor.”

Beidler’s work will be followed by seven other artists, selected from a pool of 35 applicants from across the United States. We look forward to presenting their work! Check back often to see who we’re featuring, and make sure to catch a glimpse of our windows next time your bus passes through Prefontaine Place South.

 

Art of the City Streetfest 2015

DAIPAN Butoh Collective performing during Art of the City Streetfest last year.
DAIPAN Butoh Collective performing during Art of the City Streetfest last year.
DAIPAN Butoh Collective performing during Art of the City Streetfest last year.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

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DAIPAN Butoh Collective performing during Art of the City Streetfest last year.
DAIPAN Butoh Collective performing during Art of the City Streetfest last year.

Saturday, August 1, 2015

11:00 am – 11:00 pm; 4Culture offices and Gallery4Culture open 10:00 am – 6:00 pm

Next Saturday, Prefontaine Place South – our favorite block – will be filled end-to-end with 12 hours of visual art, theatre and music performances, live art-making opportunities, and, of course, food and drink. Art of the City Streetfest is put on by the Tashiro Kaplan building and the artists who live and work there. Throughout the day, they will be featuring a huge array of work by residents, both indoors and out, so make sure to check them out online and follow them on Facebook and Twitter to stay updated on Streetfest happenings.

4Culture is excited to celebrate with our neighbors! Gallery4Culture will be open from 10:00 am – 6:00 pm on the day of Streetfest, featuring our current show, SWEEP by artist collective Let’s (hint: see the piece in action on our Instagram feed). Our offices will be open as well, hosting a dance performance unlike any other:  the DAIPANbutoh Collective will perform Galaanza III, directed by Sheri Brown and Joan Laage. Galaanza III will begin in our offices and move through the street fair, with the Collective’s 50 performers using desks, windows, railings, and just about everything else in sight as their performance space. Rather than drawing from a formalized set of movements like ballet or folk dance, butoh shape-shifts with sensations, emotions, and imagination – our office space is sure to come alive in some very exciting ways! Sheri Brown received a 4Culture 2015 Art Projects grant to support Galaanza III.

Ananda Mela: Joyful Festival of India

Apna Bhangra Crew, by Byron Drazey
Apna Bhangra Crew, by Byron Drazey

Saturday and Sunday, July 25 – 26, 2015
Redmond City Hall Campus, Redmond, WA

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Apna Bhangra Crew, by Byron Drazey
Apna Bhangra Crew, by Byron Drazey

Saturday and Sunday, July 25 – 26, 2015
Redmond City Hall Campus, Redmond, WA

There aren’t many events where you can sample food, watch exciting dance performances, take in some beautiful hand-made art, cheer on a chess competitor, and vote for your favorite youth science project, all in the same day. That’s the beauty of Ananda Mela – celebrating and exploring the huge array of cultures and traditions that India has to offer.

Entering its sixth year, Ananda Mela is a free, two-day festival showcasing the sights, sounds, tastes and spirit of this remarkably diverse country. Put on by the Vedic Cultural Center, Ananda Mela draws over 20,000 visitors each year, making it by far the largest festival of India in the Northwest. The full schedule is available on their website – pick your favorite happenings, or head to the festival and discover something new! 4Culture is proud to have funded this event.

Check out Ananda Mela on Facebook for festival schedule updates, and follow them on Twitter at @VCCAnandaMela.

2015 Cultural Equipment Awards

Tybalt and Mercutio in a Young Shakespeare Workshop Production of Romeo and Juliet © 2013, Image Courtesy of Young Shakespeare Workshop

4Culture’s Cultural Equipment program provides grants for arts, heritage and preservation organizations to purchase the equipment they need to do their best work. We recognize that new stage lighting, a safe, functional ceramic kiln, or an energy-efficient HVAC system can make all the difference in the way an organization is able to serve their community. This program is how we support those critical needs.

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YSW Romeo  Juliet 4
Tybalt and Mercutio in a Young Shakespeare Workshop Production of Romeo and Juliet © 2013, Image Courtesy of Young Shakespeare Workshop

158 (1)4Culture’s Cultural Equipment program provides grants for arts, heritage and preservation organizations to purchase the equipment they need to do their best work. We recognize that new stage lighting, a safe, functional ceramic kiln, or an energy-efficient HVAC system can make all the difference in the way an organization is able to serve their community. This program is how we support those critical needs.

A five-person panel reviewed 158 applications in June, awarding grants to 59 organizations in total. There are at least 2 recipients in each of King County’s 9 council districts – a testament to the commitment to geographic diversity that is a big part of 4Culture’s mission. 24 of this year’s applicants were first-timers, 12 of whom were successfully funded. All in all, we were able to distribute more than $300,000 this cycle.

Program Highlights

  • Young Shakespeare Workshop will use their grant to purchase 16th century replica fencing swords. Having these historically accurate stage props will support them in their mission of engaging new generations with Shakespearean works.
  • At Northwest Railway Museum even the shelves are getting tracks! These new shelving units will be a space-efficient means of storage. Plus, we’re always on board with an organization getting organized.
  • Sandpoint Arts and Culture Exchange was one of just over a dozen organizations in our area given a license to operate a low-power FM station – they’ll use their grant to get radio equipment for this exciting new venture.

You can view the full list of 2015 Cultural Equipment recipients on the program page.

Congratulations to all!