2015-16 Sustained Support Deadline Approaching

Free ride program at South Lake Union Park, Seattle © 2013, The Center for Wooden Boats
Free ride program at South Lake Union Park, Seattle © 2013, The Center for Wooden Boats

Sustained Support for Arts, Heritage & Preservation Programs

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Free ride program at South Lake Union Park, Seattle © 2013, The Center for Wooden Boats
Free ride program at South Lake Union Park, Seattle © 2013, The Center for Wooden Boats

Sustained Support for Arts, Heritage & Preservation Programs

Deadline: October 15, 2014, 5:00 PM

4Culture’s Sustained Support program provides operating support for King County-based nonprofit cultural organizations, municipal preservation agencies and local arts agencies. Until 5:00 pm on Wednesday, October 15th, organizations and agencies can apply for two-year support and, if funded, can use the awarded amount for nearly anything to do with operations: staffing, supplies, utilities, rent, programming, etc. Sustained Support is offered every two years.

Applications are now available and we encourage all interested in applying, or re-applying, to contact 4Culture staff to determine which program area is the best fit for your organization. As with other 4Culture funding programs, organizations practicing and supporting traditional cultures in King County are encouraged to apply.

For Arts organizations or agencies, view program guidelines here.

For Heritage organizations, view program guidelines here.

For Preservation organizations or agencies, view program guidelines here.

Application workshops will be offered in September and early October. Dates and locations are listed under the “Help” tab on the program guidelines page, or see the full schedule below. If you would like to learn more about Arts, Heritage, or Preservation Sustained Support, click on a program page above. You will also be able to access the applications from these pages. Don’t hesitate to contact 4Culture staff if you have questions about applying.

Arts: Bret Fetzer, call (206)205-8592 or email

Heritage: Eric Taylor, call (206)296-8688 or email

Preservation: Flo Lentz,  call (206) 296-8682 or  email

 

2015-2016 Sustained Support Workshop Schedule

Monday, September 8, 12-1 pm (Arts only) 4Culture

Tuesday, September 9, 2014, 12:30-1:30 pm (Arts & Heritage)
Bothell Library
18215 98th Ave. NE
Bothell, WA 98011

Thursday, September 11, 12-1 pm (Heritage only) 4Culture

Monday, September 15, 12-1 pm  (Arts only) 4Culture

Tuesday, September 16, 2014, 12:30-1:30 pm (Arts & Heritage)
Federal Way Library
34200 1st Way S.
Federal Way, 98003

Wednesday, September 17, 12-1 pm (Preservation only) 4Culture

Thursday, September 18, 12-1 pm (Heritage only) 4Culture

Monday, September 22, 12-1 pm (Arts Only) 4Culture

Wednesday, September 24, 12-1 pm (Preservation only) 4Culture

Thursday, September 25, 12-1 pm (Heritage only) 4Culture

Monday, September 29, 12-1 pm (Arts only) 4Culture

Tuesday, September 30, 2014, 12:30-1:30 pm (Arts & Heritage)
Bellevue Library
1111 110th Ave. NE
Bellevue, 98004

Wednesday, October 1, 12-1 pm (Preservation only) 4Culture

Thursday, October 2, 12-1 pm (Heritage only) 4Culture

Monday, October 6, 12-1 pm (Arts only) 4Culture

Wednesday, October 8, 12-1 pm (Preservation only) 4Culture

Thursday, October 9, 12-1 pm (Heritage only) 4Culture

Mon, October 13, 12-1 pm (Arts only) 4Culture

Cowboys and Astronauts and Talented Youth!

Filmmaker Tashaila Garrett being interviewed on the red carpet at NFFTY 2014. Photo by Victor Antonio Labarthe.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Jessica Lenderts.

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Filmmaker Tashaila Garrett being interviewed on the red carpet at NFFTY 2014.  Photo by Victor Antonio Labarthe.
Filmmaker Tashaila Garrett being interviewed on the red carpet at NFFTY 2014. Photo by Victor Antonio Labarthe.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Jessica Lenderts.

There’s a certain kind of joy that comes from viewing the work of a master artist in the prime of their career – the kind of feeling you get when looking at a Monet painting, listening to a classic symphony or watching a great Scorsese film. There’s an entirely different, and just as wonderful, feeling that comes with experiencing the work of someone who is clearly at the very beginning of a promising career, and whose nascent talents are just emerging and being shaped. That’s what it was like to attend NFFTY, the National Film Festival for Talented Youth [at SIFF Cinema on April 27, 2014]. The Centerpiece Screening showcased the work of eight different young filmmakers, and spanned a variety of genres and topics. I was astounded by the breadth of work shown during the evening – especially given that this was just one small part of a much larger festival. Each film was entirely unique, and different than anything I’d ever seen before. From a short documentary about the leader of a homeless community in Indianapolis, to a music video featuring a pink-haired, sword-fighting heroine, to a story about the decimation of a Native American tribe, each film clearly displayed talent, depth of thought, and hard work on the part of the filmmakers.

To be sure, a few films stood above the rest, while others at times veered into more amateurish territory. My guest and I read the descriptions of all the films beforehand, and interestingly, some of the films we had been looking forward to the most turned out not to be our favorites, while others surprised us. Our favorite films were “Run with Me”, a beautiful film about physically handicapped young man who struggles to compete in sports, and “Journey Home”, a sweet short story about an astronaut who has just returned from the moon. One film, “Callback”, about a young university student who goes to an STD clinic, mystified us – we thought it was the best-scripted and most artistically shot of all the films, but it had an abrupt ending left us hanging (and wanting to know more). Another film, “Cowboys of Chincoteague,” was very well shot but had some stylistic incongruities that made us laugh. It was a great way to spend an evening, at times intriguing, funny, and poignant by turns.

It was also great to see the range of different ethnicities, abilities, and issues presented in the films. I thought it was especially nice to see young filmmakers taking on complex issues like racism, historical injustice, disabilities, homelessness, and global politics. I also thought it was interesting to see the geographical range of the filmmakers, who came from the U.S., Canada, and the U.K. After the screening there was a question-and-answer session with the filmmakers, and it was neat to hear about the creative process (and sheer amount of hard work!) that went in to making their films.

Talented Youth will be presenting a series of music videos at the downtown branch of Seattle Public Library at 2 pm on Saturday, Sept 27. The next NFFTY will be in the spring of 2015.

 

Straight Lines and Full Stops

Dancers in the Holiday Concert from Pacific Ballroom Dance. Photo by Garrett Gibbons.
Dancers in the Holiday Concert from Pacific Ballroom Dance. Photo by Garrett Gibbons.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Mary Sherhart.

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Dancers in the Holiday Concert from Pacific Ballroom Dance.  Photo by Garrett Gibbons.
Dancers in the Holiday Concert from Pacific Ballroom Dance. Photo by Garrett Gibbons.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Mary Sherhart.

What Pacific Ballroom Dance presented on stage reflected their mission perfectly:  to build character, instill good values and provide youth with a positive artistic, social, and athletic experience. The quality of the performance reflected attention to detail and professionalism.  The costumes were colorful and neat, ranging from gingham to sequined satin gowns.  The girls’ hair and make-up was perfect.  The boys’ shoes shined and shirts ironed.  Lines were straight and full stops were held perfectly.  The final tableaus that ended almost every piece were flawless and well thought out; picture perfect.  Their teachers obviously gave them great instruction on staying in character throughout a piece.  Their smiles looked mostly natural, chests lifted, eyes focused, and backs straight.  Carriage is so important for ballroom, however, who knows how many of these kids will actually go into ballroom.  Even if they don’t, they will have wonderful posture their entire lives thanks to PBD.

This was the matinee performance of PBD’s annual holiday concert.  This 70-minute performance featured 14 separate pieces performed by various teams in costume (youth premier team, junior show, junior premier, kids & ballet classes, youth show, preteen, and an all-company finale).   The finale included 135 performers.  The music was mostly jolly pop holiday classics like Jingle Bells, Santa Baby, etc.  The choreographers considered the audience in the overall flow of the show and the separate pieces.  Each piece was short and the pieces quite varied, which kept the audience engaged from start to finish.   They used lifts and stunts to good effect.  Nice breadth of emotion from humor to pathos.

I appreciated the attention to stagecraft.  Lighting was used to mostly good effect, though there was a gold wash that, rather than looking warm, made the stage a little somber for my tastes.  The lit Christmas tree placed upstage off center for the entire concert was a perfect touch as was the smoke, snow, occasional spot and various props placed by the performers.  No one, and I mean no one, peeked from the wings.  That was amazing for a children’s performance.  Kudos to the instructors!

The audience was filled with enthusiastic and loving family members rooting on their young performer(s).  There were babes in arms to grandparents with walkers and all ages in between.  It was lovely to hear siblings and friends calling out names of various performers.  One particularly charming moment happened after a number in which the snow machine was used.  As a young man quickly swept the snow off the darkened stage with a wide broom, some kid in the audience yelled, “BROOM!”  Everyone laughed and applauded wildly.  Very fun.

The opening choreography was a fabulous romp and got the concert started with a bang.  The music was uncomfortably loud, but by the second number it was at a comfortable level.  The ending bow was one of the best I’ve seen – so exciting and energetic, and obviously well-rehearsed.

Pacific Ballroom Dance’s next Spring Concert is on May 30-31 at Auburn Performing Arts Center .

 

826 Seattle is all about young writers

826 Seattle tutoring. Photo courtesy of 826 Seattle.
826 Seattle tutoring. Photo courtesy of 826 Seattle.
826 Seattle tutoring. Photo courtesy of 826 Seattle.

826 Seattle is one of the many organizations in King County that support young people with programs focusing on learning and experience. We are proud to help fund 826 Seattle through our Sustained Support program. Guest Alicia Craven  shares a little about the organization and their upcoming programs.

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826 Seattle tutoring. Photo courtesy of 826 Seattle.
826 Seattle tutoring. Photo courtesy of 826 Seattle.

826 Seattle is one of the many organizations in King County that support young people with programs focusing on learning and experience. We are proud to help fund 826 Seattle through our Sustained Support program. Guest Alicia Craven  shares a little about the organization and their upcoming programs.

826 Seattle is a nonprofit youth writing, tutoring and publishing center dedicated to helping youth improve their creative and expository writing skills, and helping teachers inspire their students to write. 826 Seattle provides after school tutoring help to students ages 6 to 18, partners with public school teachers in the region on ambitious in-schools writing project, hosts three times a week writing field trips, holds weekend and summer writing workshops, and publishes books of student writing, all free of charge to families and schools. 826 Seattle is located in the Greenwood neighborhood, behind the Greenwood Space Travel Supply Company– a facade that sparks the imagination of young writers.

This spring 826 has a wide variety of free weekend writing workshops, for example– “Sugary-Sweet Stories”– food writing for first and second graders, “Break a Leg” play writing for third through fifth graders, “How to Podcast Everything” radio story writing for middle school students, and “Elements of Style” knowing (and breaking) grammar rules in fiction for high school writers.

Workshops range from one to three sessions, and sign-ups are available on the programming section of the 826 Seattle website. Free classes are also offered throughout the month of July; class listings will be posted in early June.

826 Seattle relies heavily on the skills and expertise of community volunteers. Learn more by visiting the website: www.826seattle.org.

Transported in Time to the Bors Hede Inn

Camlann Medieval Village. Photo by Roger Shell.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Jessica Lenderts.

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Camlann Medieval Village.  Photo by Roger Shell.
Camlann Medieval Village. Photo by Roger Shell.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Jessica Lenderts.

For those with a love of history and a desire to try something new, the Camlann Yuletide Feast is nothing short of magical. While a Renaissance Fair-type reenactment might be the first thing that comes to mind, the Yuletide Feast is a much more intimate and relaxed experience, and one in which you are an active participant, not just a spectator. Camlann is a living history site, and it’s clear that its members (or “interpreters”) are truly making an effort to help you feel like you’re being transported in time – from the surroundings and clothing to the preparation of the food and even patterns of speech, everything reflects a careful attention to detail and historical accuracy. I was once part of a reenactment troupe myself, so I know that it can be somewhat challenging to find the right balance between the historical character you’re portraying and the fact that you’re interacting with very modern people. In my opinion, the interpreters at Camlann do a great job of navigating this divide and playing out a historical scene with both earnestness and a sense of humor.

When my guest and I arrived at the feast, we were greeted warmly by Roger, the “hosteler” at the Bors Hede Inn, and ushered into a large room where other guests were already seated at long wooden tables. Roger and the other interpreters – serving men and women, a herald, musicians and performers, and a noble lady who presided over the feast – were all in period costumes. The feast began with a speech of welcome and presentation of a yule candle to the noble lady, and then trenchers – slabs of bread that were used as plates in the middle ages – were distributed to each guest, and spiced wine was poured into heavy metal goblets. Three courses were served throughout the evening, and as each was brought out, Roger described the dishes being served and their preparation. My guest and I were continuously impressed with the sumptuousness of the meal, which included multiple kinds of wine, roasted meats of every variety, a whole goose, salmon, and dessert. The dishes used only ingredients and cooking methods that were available in the Middle Ages, which in some cases made them unfamiliar to the modern palate, but they were always delicious. All the food was shared communally, and dishes were passed down the table as they were served. There was also entertainment – medieval songs and a performance by a “traveling minstrel” – in between each course. The evening progressed at a leisurely place, and we left feeling full, happy, and like we had enjoyed a very unique experience.

It’s obvious that the staff put a lot of effort and heart into this production. It seems like it has also become something of a community center point, and the interpreters knew several attendees by name or face. Efforts were also made to dietary needs, which is never an easy feat with a large communal meal! The flow of the event was smooth and practiced, despite the complexity of bringing out many different dishes on time.

The feast took place on the lower floor of the Bors Hede Inn in the Camlann village. With the exception of the bathrooms, which were thankfully modern, the building is stylized to resemble a medieval inn, from the building façade and furniture to small details of decoration. The feast room was crafted to resemble a small hall, with long wooden tables and benches, a central fireplace, and beautiful paintings on the walls that were carefully done in the style of the period. Food was brought down from a kitchen on the upper floor. Although there was a small fire burning, the room was fairly chilly, and sitting on hard wooden benches for hours does start to become a little uncomfortable – but this is all part of the authenticity of the experience. Unfortunately, it was too dark when we arrived to explore the village as much as I would have liked (and it was also a very cold night); but what we could see was reminiscent of a small medieval village just as I would imagine it.

Camlann Medieval Village has a variety of events year-round; the Mid-Lenten Feast is on March 22, the St. George Feast is on April 26, and the May Festival is on May 3 & 4.

Wing Luke doesn't stop at its front door

Patrons at War Baby / Love Child at Wing Luke Museum. Photo © Jake Kwong, 2013
Patrons at War Baby / Love Child at Wing Luke Museum. Photo © Jake Kwong, 2013
Patrons at War Baby / Love Child at Wing Luke Museum. Photo © Jake Kwong, 2013

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Kascha Snavely.

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Patrons at War Baby / Love Child at Wing Luke Museum. Photo © Jake Kwong, 2013
Patrons at War Baby / Love Child at Wing Luke Museum. Photo © Jake Kwong, 2013

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Kascha Snavely.

Wing Luke is officially the “Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.” Just as the full title is quite a mouthful, the complete mission of the museum is expansive. The museum was founded in honor of Wing Luke, a leader in the Chinese-American community of Seattle. Today, the museum has expanded from these more specific cultural roots with the intent to represent many groups living in the International District and across the Pacific Northwest. Spread across several floors and two buildings on King Street in the International District, the museum presents a range of relevant exhibits from contemporary art to detailed replicas of immigrant living quarters, to histories of conflict. During my visit the travelling exhibit War Baby / Love Child occupied the main gallery beside several rooms of permanent exhibits. The heart of the museum, however, is accessed only with a guided tour, included with all admissions: In the restored store and hotel next door, different rooms memorialize the experience of Chinese-Americans, Filipino Americans and Japanese-Americans. Over the course of an hour, a staff member led me through the narrow halls and fire-doors of the restored hotel, giving a brief history of three cycles of immigration to the US by these groups.   After the detailed tour, I wandered the permanent exhibitions with a clear historical narrative already grounding my understanding of the objects on display.

I had heard that the tours at the Wing Luke were great, but I wasn’t prepared for how engaging and detailed the hour-long tour would be. I learned more – or retained more – about Asian American immigration and Seattle’s history from her talk than I have in any history reading. She connected specific objects (a false Mason’s crest on a Chinese organization’s balcony) to specific historical moments (the prohibition years when Masonic temples escaped close scrutiny by the law). I could connect the image of a lively party with a host of dates and historical events.

I had to pull myself away from the video installations in War Baby / Love Child to get to the start of the tour. Shoes by Louie Gong caught my eyes, and an eerie video by Laurel Nakadate held my attention for half an hour. The exhibit’s narrative focused on Asian American with mixed heritage struggle to describe themselves even as the misnomers of “war babies” and “love children” fade. The work itself – rich in craft and imagery – stood on its own as good art, above and beyond a search for “identity.”

The Wing Luke literally does not stop at its front door: it extends into the renovated store and hotel next door. That building gives concrete evidence of the neighborhood’s past: Original fire doors memorialize past traumas; narrow rooms show changing living conditions; a mahjong set on an original table gives a sense of the inhabitants’ lives. For a historical museum, this is an ideal facility. This gives depth to the contemporary exhibits.

This is a text-heavy museum. Reading all the material occasionally distracted me from actually looking at the objects that really tell the story. The exhibitions themselves include complicated tombstones for each object and image.  Printed material scattered across the front desk and entry way describes many exhibits and events at the museum. The website can take a good half an hour to scan.  Only in the art exhibit did the text take second stage to the work. I learned so much from all this material, but I welcomed the break to simply see art.

Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience is open Tuesday-Sunday from 10-5 pm.  The current exhibit #iconic runs through April 13; another exhibit, Grit, runs through October 17.

 

Remember Those They Hurt

The cast of Gentleman Desperado at Mary Olsen Farm.
The cast of Gentleman Desperado at Mary Olsen Farm.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Tamara Vallejos.

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The cast of Gentleman Desperado at Mary Olsen Farm.
The cast of Gentleman Desperado at Mary Olsen Farm.

Through the On-Site Review program, 4Culture evaluates arts and heritage organizations who receive Sustained Support funding. On-Site Reviewers attend events produced or presented by recipients and write up short reviews, which give the adjudicating Sustained Support panelists a patron’s-eye-view of each organization.  Each month, the 4Culture blog presents excerpts from these reviews.  This month’s review is by Tamara Vallejos.

 

Gentlemen Desperado is a site-specific production set on the Mary Olson Farm [maintained by the White River Valley Museum]. The play, written by Keri Healey, tells the true story of bank robber Harry Tracy, beginning with his escape from prison in the 1900s and then following his extensive manhunt throughout the Pacific Northwest. During that chase, Tracy made his way to Auburn and stayed briefly at the Mary Olson Farm, where he held its residents hostage. This story takes place on actual land Tracy roamed.

After a host introduces the play to the audience just down the path from the farm’s entrance, everyone is instructed to walk up to a clearing next to the farmhouse, where “prison guards” shout at everyone to file into lines. The audience is part of the action as Tracy rushes past, kills several guards, and makes his break. From there, the audience follows the path to the next location, where they sit on benches and hay bales to watch. A unique and entertaining aspect of the production is that a folk duo walks alongside the audience between scenes, playing original music throughout the production. The actors, musicians, and audience meander through the farm as the play goes on, with it ending inside the barn.  Afterward, the audience is invited to continue exploring the farm and farmhouse to see how a family in the early 1900s lived.

Gentlemen Desperado was such a treat, for several reasons. The performances were quite good, and the actors were very enthusiastic, sprinting around the farm and swapping costumes as they swapped roles. Because we were outdoors and moving, it was important that the actors all spoke loudly and clearly, and they did. The musical accompaniment was also a huge part of what made the production successful. The folk music could stand on its own even outside the context of the play, and the rustic, vintage tunes did a very nice job of helping set the scene.

In addition to being entertaining, the piece was educational; as someone who didn’t grow up in Washington, I felt more connected to the history of the region after watching the play. It was also thought-provoking—the play ended by prompting the audience to consider why we remember criminals like Tracy, but not those they hurt. For its part, Gentlemen Desperado shared the names of all the people Tracy killed, which made for an emotional finish.

But the best part was being on the Mary Olson Farm itself. It’s very easy in 2013 to completely forget that people ever lived differently from how we do now—and not all that long ago. Being on the farm for the production helped transport me to Tracy’s era, and put into context what life was like for ordinary citizens during that time. I don’t think the effect would have been the same, or as memorable, had Gentlemen Desperado taken place in a traditional theatrical space.

The Mary Olson Farm is tucked away just down the road from the Auburn Golf Course, and isn’t too easy to spot from the main road. I spotted the farm’s free parking lot, and that’s what let me know I was in the right place, but I didn’t know where to go from there. Thankfully, an official shuttle bus soon pulled up and a very friendly driver took me to the farm. As it turns out, the entrance was just a five minute walk away, but the trail wasn’t very clearly marked.

Once inside the farm, walking paths are clearly marked and the land is well manicured and cared for. One of the highlights to the location is the farmhouse is right next to a creek full of salmon. After the production ended, many in the audience stood by the creek for a long while, watching the salmon swim upstream. The farmhouse was also open to browse after the production ended, and a guide was there to answer questions. For additional education, there were several signs throughout the farm that gave more information on its history and use.

Mary Olsen Farm is open every Saturday and Sunday, late June through August.

Another FIRST for Historic Preservation in King County

Tour of home originally designed and built by architect Arnold Gangnes © 2012, courtesy of Docomomo WEWA
Tour of home originally designed and built by architect Arnold Gangnes © 2012, courtesy of Docomomo WEWA

Announcing 4Culture’s Inaugural Preservation Sustained Support Awardees

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Announcing 4Culture’s Inaugural Preservation Sustained Support Awardees

TTour of West Seattle home originally designed and built by architect Arnold Gangnes © 2012, courtesy of Docomomo WEWA

This week the 4Culture Board formally approved funding for preservation-based organizations from around King County. Arts and Heritage groups countywide have long benefitted from 4Culture’s Sustained Support funding, which provides a predictable level of annual revenue for operations.  Now for the first time, non-profits, public development authorities, and municipal programs dedicated to preserving the built environment have been brought into the fold.

Sixteen such organizations will receive annual grants that range from $750 to $12,000.  These funds can be used for anything operational, from staff salaries, to consultant fees, to website upgrades, utilities, or rent.

Many of these organizations have been active for years, stewarding well-loved historic properties like the little Vincent Schoolhouse in the rural Snoqualmie Valley, or promoting awareness of certain property types, such as Seattle’s Olmsted Parks. Others are newer to the cultural scene, such as the very energetic Friends of Mukai Farm group on Vashon.

One highly effective, all-volunteer group that will receive support is DOCOMOMO WeWa (short for Documentation and Conservation of the Modern Movement, Western Washington). Every year since its founding in 1998, DOCOMOMO WeWa has offered a full slate of tours, lectures, and events that celebrate Northwest Modernist architecture and design, through education and advocacy.

Whittaker House tour attendee looking at original drawings of the residence © 2013 courtesy of Docomomo WEWA

A larger, professionally staffed organization that will receive support is SCIDpda (Seattle Chinatown/International District Preservation & Development Authority). Founded in 1977, SCIDpda plays a major role in promoting the vitality of that diverse and vibrant neighborhood.

All grantees will contract with 4Culture to provide King County citizens with clear public benefits in 2014. WELCOME to all our new Sustained Support grantees!

For a complete list of the first round of Sustained Support recipients visit the program page, and click on the “Recipients” tab.

Images: Tour of West Seattle home originally designed and built by architect Arnold Gangnes © 2012, courtesy of Docomomo WEWA; Whittaker House tour attendee looking at original drawings of the residence © 2013 courtesy of Docomomo WEWA