Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac – and Five Other Extraordinary and Endangered Historic Properties in Washington

© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

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© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

At the time of its creation, Johnson Pit #30 looked out on a sparsely developed Kent Valley with a rich agricultural history. Its contemplative site and bucolic view has since been dramatically changed by housing and industrial developments. 4Culture is committed to the preservation and restoration of this unique artwork. The designation by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation and an earlier recognition as part of the Cultural Landscape Foundation’s Landslide 2014 Art and the Landscape will help the efforts to secure King County landmark status and a listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Since 1992, the independent, nonprofit Washington Trust for Historic Preservation has used its Most Endangered Historic Properties List to bring attention to over 100 threatened sites nominated by concerned citizens and organizations across the state. As part of this outreach and education program, the Washington Trust assists advocates to develop strategies and opportunities for reducing immediate threats and to find positive preservation solutions for the endangered historic properties.

The six projects featured in this year’s Most Endangered List, including the Robert Morris Earthwork, are described in short videos and linked photos posted on the Washington Trust website.

Gallery4Culture: Christopher Buening explores his Midwestern roots

© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.

Christopher Buening: Hunter<Gatherer
June 4 – 25, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, June 4, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

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© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.

Christopher Buening: Hunter<Gatherer
June 4 – 25, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, June 4, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Gallery4Culture
101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

Gallery4Culture is pleased to present artist Christopher Buening in Hunter<Gatherer, a compilation of mixed media installations that explore time, memory and the emergence of self-awareness. Referring to the theme that unites this body of work, Buening gleans a quote from Patti Smith’s 2010 memoir Just Kids “…Occasionally we discover in the folds of an old handkerchief a shell or insignificant stone that had once embodied our happiest afternoons.”

Christopher Buening grew up in a family whose interests were in sharp contrast to his own temperament. His father, the consummate sportsman, possessed a fervor to instill this passion in his son. In Buening’s words:

“My father is an ardent hunter. He rabidly supports the NRA and is a staunch conservative. He also collects guns, knives and hunting paraphernalia and is out shooting at least 4 times a week (hunting, target practice, sporting clays). I was taught to shoot down in the quarry near our old cabin in Wisconsin as soon as I able to hold a gun with his guidance. When I was old enough to complete Hunter’s Safety, he almost always brought me along on hunting trips and sport shooting. I have spent countless hours in the woods with him tracking deer, grouse, woodcock, etc. I just was never any good at it.”

Buening continues “I did however love the old hunting cabin on the lake in Florence County, WI. I enjoyed being in the woods for hours finding mushrooms, building forts, looking at the plants and trees, frogs and birds. But I hated shooting animals. To please my father, though, I sometimes pretended I did. I was far more interested in the more delicate aspects of life: art and music, drawing and decorating. And I liked collecting things I would find in the woods, on the lake beaches and back roads while I was up there. And I am still an obsessive collector of things I find on the ground and random bits of ephemera I come across in my daily travels. To me each rock, shell or piece of plastic represents a moment. I remember where I was or what I was thinking the moment I pocketed it.”

Hunter<Gatherer incorporates most of its elements from Buening’s compulsive accumulation of random flotsam and jetsam. In contrast, the vases, vessels and urns function as containers created to gather and hold things – feelings and ashes (mainly of the dead). But as its title suggests, the bulk of the exhibition is about hunting and those bygone days in a tiny cabin in northern Wisconsin.

About the Artist: Christopher Buening was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1973. He earned a BFA in 1997 from Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. He relocated to Seattle in 1999. Buening is a long-standing member of the Seattle artist collective SOIL and has, during the past 15 years. actively exhibited his art throughout the region. His work is represented in the Washington State, King County, and city of Seattle public art collections.

www.chrisbuening.com

Touring Arts Roster Plays Folklife

Supersones, Photo by Hugo Ludena
Supersones, Photo by Hugo Ludena
TAR Artists at 2015 Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)

4Culture’s Touring Arts Roster boasts nearly 200 talented individual artists and groups from throughout King County who present fantastic performances from almost every discipline. If you’re taking in Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend, you are bound to be seeing them. We recommend you seek them out!

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TAR Artists at Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)
TAR Artists at 2015 Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)

4Culture’s Touring Arts Roster boasts nearly 200 talented individual artists and groups from throughout King County who present fantastic performances from almost every discipline. If you’re taking in Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend, you are bound to be seeing them. We recommend you seek them out!

Here’s a schedule to map your way:

Friday 5/22
 11:10AM Paul ‘Che oke ten’ Wagner Fisher Green Stage
 11:30AM Mariide (w/Folklore Society Song Circle) Cornish Playhouse Courtyard
 1:00PM Bonnie Birch Discovery Zone Stage
 2:00PM Paul ‘Che oke ten’ Wagner Discovery Zone Stage
 3:10PM Lonely Coast Folklife Café
 5:00PM Eva Abram Folklife Café
 7:35PM Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons Trad Stage
 7:45PM Global Heat Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
9:00PM Suntonio Bandanaz (featured with Julie C.) Vera Project
Saturday 5/23
11:00AM Dunava Bagley Wright Theatre
11:00AM Mary Sherhart (featured in Bulgarian Showcases) Bagley Wright Theater
3:05PM Pickled Okra Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
3:30PM Mariide Trad Stage
4:00PM Te Fare O Tamatoa Cornish Playhouse
4:35PM George Sadak Ex Hall International Dance Stage
6:00PM Mary Sherhart (Tazi Baba/This Grandma) SIFF Film Center
7:55PM Vela Luka Croatian Dance Ensemble Ex Hall International Dance Stage
Sunday 5/24
11:00AM Gansango Music & Dance Armory Center Stage
11:40AM The Tarantellas Folklife Café
12:00PM Christian Swenson w/Medicine Truck Intiman “participatory” stage
12:20PM Anzanga Marimba Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
2:35PM Rouge Folklife Café
3:15PM Bailadores de Bronce
Ex Hall International Dance Stage
3:40PM Northwest Tap Connection Cornish Playhouse
4:00PM VamoLá Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
5:00PM Show Brazil! Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
6:00PM Smilin’ Scandinavians Armory Stage
7:00PM Helene Erickson’s – ANAR DANA Ex Hall International Dance Stage
9:00PM Valse Café Orchestra Fisher Pavilion
9:20PM Supersones Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
Monday 5/25
11:00AM WHOZYAMAMA Armory Center Stage
11:00AM Maggie Bennett Discovery Zone Stage
11:45AM Brian Vogan and His Good Buddies Fountain Lawn Stage
12:00PM Sound of the Northwest w/ Juan Huey-Ray Cornish Playhouse Courtyard
2:30PM Joy Mills Band Vera Project
3:30PM Juliana & PAVA Fisher Green Stage

 

Gallery4Culture: Emma Jane Levitt's art confronts loss head-on

© 2015 Emma Jane Levitt, Untitled (detail), fiber. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Emma Jane Levitt, Untitled (detail), fiber. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Emma Jane Levitt, Untitled (detail), fiber. Courtesy of the artist.

Emma Jane Levitt: In the Presence of Absence
May 7 –May 28, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, May 7, 6pm – 8 pm*

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© 2015 Emma Jane Levitt, Untitled (detail), fiber. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Emma Jane Levitt, Untitled (detail), fiber. Courtesy of the artist.

Emma Jane Levitt: In the Presence of Absence
May 7 –May 28, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, May 7, 6pm – 8 pm*

Gallery4Culture
101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

Gallery4Culture is pleased to introduce Emma Jane Levitt in a solo installation that investigates the experience of loss, the process of grief, and the longing for connection. In the Presence of Absence explores (both literally and metaphorically) the ways we are connected to one another as well as to place. This body of work centers on a shattering experience that happened two summers ago. On a beautiful July evening in 2013, Emma Levitt returned home after being away for a few hours, to discover that her partner was not asleep atop their bed – but was, in fact, lying there dead. Chris was young and fit, but at 41 he had had a heart attack. His death sudden and unexpected.

Grappling for what might console her, Emma was determined to grieve in her own way and at her own pace. Finding a tactile expression for her loss, a method to hold her partner close, a manner in which to mark and to pass time, and a way in which to hold space for the grief, Emma decided to knit her way through the experience.

Emma Levitt’s mother and grandmother were long-time knitters, who had taught her how to knit when she was a child. Emma gathered together all of her lost partner’s clothing and began to cut every article – jeans to briefs-to shirts and ties – into narrow strips that would become a bounty of yarn. She acquired huge wooden needles, rolled the cloth ribbons into big balls, and began to knit. Fifteen months later, she had a mural sized rectangle, a gigantic comforter. In the Presence of Absence consists of a 14 by 16 foot hanging knit mural and a series of monochromatic white embossed works on paper that hold the shadowy imprints of handkerchiefs.

The show will hang in Gallery4Culture through May and will travel to the John Sommers Gallery at the University of New Mexico in September, 2015.

About the Artist: Emma Levitt is a Seattle based artist working in textile, printmaking, photography and artist books. She has been recognized with the Clowes Foundation Fellowship from the Vermont Studio Center, a 4Culture Individual Artist Project Award, and both the ArtBridge Fellowship and Seattle Print Arts Scholarship from Pratt Fine Art Center. Her artwork has been acquired by individuals and institutions including the Special Collections Library at Washington University in St. Louis, Seattle Print Arts, and, Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center. Ms. Levitt teaches at North Seattle College, Pratt Fine Art Center and the Frye Art Museum. Levitt earned a BFA from Washington University in St. Louis and is currently an MFA candidate at the University of New Mexico. View her work at: emmajanelevitt.com.

*Vouchers for free 1st Thursdays patron parking, 5 pm – 10 pm, at the Frye Parking Garage, 117 3rd Ave S, are available at Gallery4Culture on a first-come basis.

Of Small Means: Vertical Plank Dwellings in the PNW

Archival image of a vertical plank dwelling, Courtesy of Historic Seattle
Archival image of a vertical plank dwelling, Courtesy of Historic Seattle
Archival image of a vertical plank dwelling, Courtesy of Historic Seattle

Of Small Means is a presentation by local architecture historian and preservation consultant Kate Krafft, detailing her research findings about a construction method called Vertical plank construction (VPC). This method is distinct from the other methods commonly associated with Washington’s settlement era, such as full log, hewn log or balloon-frame, and is more prevalent in our region than had been previously recognized.

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5341 Ballard 1
Archival image of a vertical plank dwelling, Courtesy of Historic Seattle

Of Small Means is a presentation by local architecture historian and preservation consultant Kate Krafft, detailing her research findings about a construction method called Vertical plank construction (VPC). This method is distinct from the other methods commonly associated with Washington’s settlement era, such as full log, hewn log or balloon-frame, and is more prevalent in our region than had been previously recognized.

VPC is a relatively fast, easy and cheap construction method, often used for temporary buildings that could easily be dismantled and occasionally for small permanent dwellings. The presentation will be followed by a tour of the Pioneer Houses, nearby examples of this construction method. The houses were relocated to the Ballard Avenue Landmark District and preserved by Historic Seattle in 1976.

Saturday, May 23rd, 1-2 pm with tour of Pioneer Houses to follow
Ballard Public Library
5614 22nd Avenue NW, Seattle, WA 98107
Free & Drop-In

The research for this project was funded through Preservation Special Projects in 2013.

Kimberly Trowbridge offers a fresh approach to painting a personal narrative.

© 2015 Kimberly Trowbridge, Framing Perception, Installation shot. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Kimberly Trowbridge, Framing Perception, Installation shot. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Kimberly Trowbridge, Framing Perception, Installation shot. Courtesy of the artist.

Kimberly Trowbridge: Framing Perception
April 2 – April 30, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, April 2, 6 pm – 8 pm
Gallery4Culture

101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

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© 2015 Kimberly Trowbridge, Framing Perception, Installation shot. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Kimberly Trowbridge, Framing Perception, Installation shot. Courtesy of the artist.

Kimberly Trowbridge: Framing Perception
April 2 – April 30, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, April 2, 6 pm – 8 pm
Gallery4Culture

101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

Gallery4Culture is pleased to feature Seattle-based artist Kimberly Trowbridge in Framing Perception, a solo exhibition that presents Trowbridge’s unique approach to image-making and constructing a personal narrative. Trowbridge’s art is self-referential, she synthesizes experience through multiple layers of perception and media. Trained as a painter, she has made a practice of breaking down that discipline’s customary constraints to combine set-like installation, video, and performance with traditional oils on canvas.

Framing Perception is grounded in a recent artist residency in Portugal. Capturing the magical light of a splendid rural setting, there is a Cézanne-like quality to Trowbridge’s plein-air paintings, paintings that serve as documentary footage to record her experience. Video, capturing the artist wandering through the gardens of the residency property, conveys the sublime experience of creating in this pastoral setting. The video imagery, in turn, provides rich source material for the paintings.

Artist Talk: Please join us for a gallery walk-through with Kimberly Trowbridge on Thursday afternoon, April 16, 2:00 – 3:00 PM. This event is free and open to the public.

Kimberly Trowbridge’s art practice ultimately examines the nature of presentation. She states “I am at an exciting moment in my career where I am using installation as a way to present my paintings within a specific context. By situating paintings within a larger theater of interactions I am able to grapple with and expand the capabilities of my vocabulary, and thus the scope of my content…. By pushing the boundaries of painting into installation, I am asking my viewers to step-into a space where they can engage with my process of building a visual language.”

About the Artist: Kimberly Trowbridge received her MFA from the University of Washington in 2006 and BFA in 2003 from Indiana University in Bloomington. She was a 2014 Neddy Award Finalist in Painting and a 2014 Artist Trust GAP recipient. She has had solo exhibitions at galleries including The Painting Center in NYC, and Blindfold Gallery in Seattle, and has been included in numerous group shows nationally. Trowbridge is an instructor and lecturer on figure painting and color theory. She has taught at the University of Washington, Western Washington University, and Gage Academy of Art. For the past six years she has run a private painting school called Top Hat Studio in south Seattle, and leads international plein-air painting tours in Spain and Portugal. Fall 2015 will be the launching of the Trowbridge Atelier, a contemporary painting intensive, through Gage Academy of Art, in Georgetown, Seattle.

From the April Issue of City Arts Magazine: The Unstoppable Kimberly Trowbridge by Amanda Manitach and Miguel Edwards

www.kimberlytrowbridge.com

Moisture Festival – the worlds largest festival of Comedy Varietè

Lelavision ©Michelle Bates
Lelavision ©Michelle Bates
Lelavision ©Michelle Bates

Featuring a Varietè of Touring Arts Roster and Other Regional Talent

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Lelavision ©Michelle Bates
Lelavision ©Michelle Bates

Featuring a Varietè of Touring Arts Roster and Other Regional Talent

Now in it’s twelfth year, Moisture Festival is the world’s largest festival of Comedy Varietè, Grand Varietè and Burlesque, presenting four weeks of shows at multiple venues in Seattle each spring. This intriguing assortment and variety of live entertainment presents highly skilled performances to delight audiences of all ages. Showcasing live bands alongside aerialists, jugglers, comedians, dancers, rope acts, bubble acts, clowns, acrobats, can can girls, strong people, tap dancers, drill teams, and more the tradition of Comedy/Varietè/Vaudeville is kept alive in the Northwest.

The festival’s Comedy/Varietè shows are at Hale’s Palladium, in the Hale’s Brewery warehouse located between Fremont and Ballard at 4301 Leary Way NW. Burlesque shows and Grand Varietè shows are presented at Broadway Performance Hall on Capitol Hill.

A Variety of 4Culture Touring Arts Roster groups are contributing to this year’s cultural extravaganza including performances thus far by Del Rey, Lelavision, Matt Baker and Uncle Bonsai!

Still to come:

Correo Aereo Trio w/Amy Denio
April 4, 2015 @ 7:30pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 4, 2015 @ 10:30pm – Hale’s Palladium

Splinter Dance Company
April 5, 2015 @ 3:00pm – Broadway Performance Hall

Christian Swenson
April 5, 2015 @ 3:00pm – Broadway Performance Hall
April 11, 2015 @ 3:00pm – Hale’s Palladium

The Bobs
April 10, 2015 @ 7:30pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 10, 2015 @ 10:30pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 11, 2015 @ 7:30pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 11, 2015 @ 10:30pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 12, 2015 @ 3:00pm – Hale’s Palladium
April 12, 2015 @ 7:30pm – Hale’s Palladium

And, don’t miss the Main Event: The MishMash Circus Bash in the gorgeous Teatro ZinZanni spiegeltent. Part circus, part dinner theatre, and always magical this three-hour whirlwind of entertainment promises to be a night out unlike any other. Tuesday, April 7th or Wednesday, April 8th.

 

How many of us think of Seattle as home to a river?

Sharon Arnold is the guest curator of our current Gallery4Culture exhibit The Duwamish Residency: Process and Artifacts. We asked Sharon if we could post her gallery statement in time for the artist talk that will take place next Tuesday, March 24, 6-7:30 pm, where residency artists will share their experience and process. Please join us for this free and public event.

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Sharon Arnold is the guest curator of our current Gallery4Culture exhibit The Duwamish Residency: Process and Artifacts. We asked Sharon if we could post her gallery statement in time for the artist talk that will take place next Tuesday, March 24, 6-7:30 pm, where residency artists will share their experience and process. Please join us for this free and public event.

MacFarlane_Over_Georgetown_2013_Bret Corrington
© 2013, Stephen MacFarlane, Over Georgetown, Monotype and graphite on paper. 24″ x 18″. Photo: Bret Corrington.

 

The Duwamish River, flowing through the southern and southwestern reaches of Seattle, is out of sight to many city dwellers on a day-to-day basis. But it’s there, threading its body through the valleys of our industrial districts; its mouth yawning through bridges and around shipyards to pour itself into Elliott Bay.

The Duwamish has been shaped by humans, and its course changed over time. It is still wild in parts, in spite of urban development, holding some small refuge for birds of prey, waterfowl, fish, and a few mammals. As an estuary, it was once home to a complex ecosystem of this kind of wildlife and humans; a resident population of cedars, firs, and alders flanking its shores alongside tideflats, swamps, forest, and wetlands. It is named after the indigenous tribe who populated this region around the river and Elliott Bay and Lake Washington, and who are still fighting for federal recognition of their tribe.

Crites_3_20_Single_Moments_2015
© 2015, Chris Crites, Unidentified reeds at Herring’s House Park from 20 single moments along the Duwamish waterway, Mixed media on paper. 2.5″ x 3.5″. Courtesy of the artist.

 

This river represents the duality of both timelessness and change. It flows, relentlessly, through land and through time. It rises, falls, and shifts color depending on the season and the weather. And though it no longer meanders, its path is now held by the walls of its industrial bed and the manufactured island splitting its delta. No longer flanked by a forest of native deciduous and evergreen trees, it is adorned with great cranes, container ships, and industrial warehouses.

To most people, the Duwamish is an abstract idea: a historical artifact, a superfund site, an unrecognized people, a thing that is largely present and yet invisible. Ask a portion of the population what comes to mind when they think of Duwamish and most will say dirty water. Many will recall the local tribe after which the river is named, the People of the Inside, and their displacement. Oddly, few will mention the industry that has replaced the forests, wildlife, and people. Much of Seattle’s historic and present-day trade is seated here: shipyards, steel mills, foundries, steam plants, rail lines, container yards, the Port of Seattle, Boeing, cargo terminals, commercial moorage, garbage and recycle facilities, the Department of Homeland Security, and a few cruise ships. And to others still, the Duwamish is home to neighborhoods like Georgetown, South Park, and Allentown. Nestled in the curves of its banks, these neighborhoods portray a rare urban environment: river life, complete with docks, rowboats, and summertime swims.

This begins to give shape to the abstraction of a river. This river we can see but not see. This river that we know of, but don’t see much of. How do we see a river?

Shen_BankLines_2015_LynnThompson
© 2015, Juliet Shen, Bank Lines, watercolor over relief print, 11” x 17”. Photo: Lynn Thompson

 

In Process and Artifacts, the twelve artists of the Duwamish Artist Residency reveal their vision of the river when they’re working along its shores, hiking through green spaces, sketching among abandoned warehouses, and shooting film from across its bridges. Through their plein-air studies, landscape drawings and paintings, abstractions, rubbings, photographs, and observations of life along the river we begin to see this underrepresented region in a new way. Their bond with this untouristed district of the city is evident in their growing visual language around the river’s history and ecology.

What I felt strongly while viewing the collection of work from the Residency was an underlying connection and response to the enduring nature of the river, the objects alongside it, the blurring of past and present (as in I could not identify a specific time), the relentless flow and movement of the river, the light, the angles, and the color. There is a kind of quiet peaceful nature to this secret revealed through artist eyes. Each piece is like a stolen moment that if not documented, would slip past like a current in the river itself.

The work throughout this exhibition reflects the nature of the Duwamish River’s flux and feeling of lapsed time. It deftly captures this cinéma-vérité, which could be any point in time, not necessarily now, but also past and future. There are recursions in the entire collection of work throughout Process and Artifacts—patterns in composition, negative space, and form. Some pieces form a grid, alluding to the surrounding city blocks; and some exist in resolute denial of it. The artists reference nature, or industry, without falling into a precise narrative about either but instead pulling forward a tactile feeling of the place. The resulting artifacts leave us with a reflection of the timeless pattern of life along a river, looping back into itself, as we loop back around to it. The river calls, and we respond.

Sharon Arnold was invited to curate this exhibition by the Duwamish Residency artists. She is co-owner and director of Roq La Rue Gallery in Seattle, Washington.


McGuigan_Pilings_2015_Art & Soul
© 2015, Fiona McGuigan, Pilings, Sumi ink and graphite on paper, 44” x 58”. Photo: Art & Soul

 

THE DUWAMISH RESIDENCY

The Duwamish Residency is an annual artist residency created in 2012 by Fiona McGuigan and Sue Danielson, two visual artists who sought to redefine the term residency to include and embrace their city of residence by stepping into and engaging with a part of the city that was unfamiliar to them. They chose the Duwamish River because of its economic and environmental importance, and for its visual and social diversity.

Mission Statement: To create a supportive environment for studio artists to work in a landscape of visual, historic and/or economic significance in a way that refreshes their practice while engaging in the artistic community. Education about both historical and contemporary issues is provided as part of the residency.

Learn more: www.duwamishresidency.com

On display through March 26:
The Duwamish Residency: Process and Artifact
Gallery4Culture
101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

Please join us in the gallery for a Duwamish Residency Artists talk on Tuesday, March 24 at 6:00 PM. This event is free and open to the public.