The Labor of Diversity: Thinking Inclusive Futures in Museums with Dr. Nicole Ivy

Thursday, December 7, 5:00—7:30 pm
Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, Seattle
Free, no registration required

Continue Reading ›

Thursday, December 7, 5:00—7:30 pm
Washington Hall, 153 14th Ave, Seattle
Free, no registration required

4Culture is proud to welcome Dr. Nicole Ivy, the American Alliance of Museums’ (AAM) Director of Inclusion, to Seattle! As Dr. Ivy leads AAM’s efforts to help museums across the country put diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion at the center of their work, we invite you to learn from her experience and insight.

Starting at 5:00 pm, 4Culture Heritage staff members Brian and Chieko will give an overview of their recently completed King County Heritage Report, and introduce upcoming 4Culture programs for heritage organizations. Dr. Ivy’s talk will begin at 6:00 pm.

Dr. Ivy first joined AAM in July 2015 as a museum futurist under a fellowship of the Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Societies. In that role she studied and published on future museum trends, specifically focused on diversity and the future of labor in the field. She was appointed as AAM’s first Director of Inclusion in July 2017. Among the projects she’s exploring is a partnership with a technology company and several pilot museums to test an online tool that could help museums reduce unintended bias in their hiring processes. Dr. Ivy earned her Ph.D. in African American Studies and American Studies from Yale University, and has done Post-Baccalaureate coursework at Cornell University.

The American Alliance of Museums has been bringing museums together since 1906, helping to develop standards and best practices, gathering and sharing knowledge, and providing advocacy on issues of concern to the entire museum community. Representing more than 30,000 individual museum professionals and volunteers, institutions, and corporate partners serving the museum field, the Alliance stands for the broad scope of the museum community. For more information, visit www.aam-us.org.

Celebrate the 2017 Conductive Garboil Recipients

Juan Alonso-Rodríguez in his studio at the Tashiro Kaplin Artist Lofts in Pioneer Square. Photo by Kseniya Sovenko.
Juan Alonso-Rodríguez in his studio at the Tashiro Kaplin Artist Lofts in Pioneer Square. Photo by Kseniya Sovenko.

Conductive Garboil Award Presentation
Wednesday, November 8, 5:00—8:00 pm

The Little London Plane, 322 Occidental Avenue S, Seattle

Continue Reading ›

Conductive Garboil Award Presentation
Wednesday, November 8, 5:00—8:00 pm

The Little London Plane, 322 Occidental Avenue S, Seattle

4Culture, Artist Trust, and the Estate of Su Job proudly announce artists Juan Alonso-Rodríguez and Romson Regarde Bustillo as the recipients of the 2017 Conductive Garboil Grant, a yearly, non‐restricted award of $3,000. We’re so pleased to award this grant to two outstanding artists this year—both Juan and Romson were selected in recognition of their history of community activism and mentorship, particularly within regional communities of color. Help us celebrate them at this free reception!

This unique grant was developed by Job just before her passing in December 2008 and acknowledges King County artists with a connection to Pioneer Square who have “demonstrated a profound ability to challenge the limits of conductive creative discourse.”

Read more about the grant, Su Job, and this year’s recipients.

Poetry on Buses Roadshow: Dia de Poesía

Poetry on Buses poems on a King County Metro bus, 2016. Photo by Tim Aguero.

Thursday, November 9, 3:00—6:30 pm
El Centro de la Raza, 1660 S Roberto Maestas Festival St, Seattle

Continue Reading ›

Thursday, November 9, 3:00—6:30 pm
El Centro de la Raza, 1660 S Roberto Maestas Festival St, Seattle

As part of El Centro de la Raza‘s Dia de los Muertos celebrations, hop aboard the poetry bus and enjoy live readings and mini writing workshops with poet Jourdan Imani Keith. There will be a special session just for kids starting at 3:00 pm!

Our year of community-sourced poems, all exploring water, is underway! Read and listen to a new poem every day at poetryonbuses.org.

Guest Post: Recognizing Mt. Baker’s History

Aerial view of the Mt. Baker Park Addition. Photo property of the Museum of History & Industry.

What goes on behind the scenes when a neighborhood or property gets formally recognized as a historic landmark? We asked the Friends of Mt. Baker Town Center to give some insight, as they are in the process of trying to transform the Mt. Baker Park Addition—a neighborhood platted in the early 20th century—into the Mt. Baker Historic District:

Continue Reading ›

What goes on behind the scenes when a neighborhood or property gets formally recognized as a historic landmark? We asked the Friends of Mt. Baker Town Center to give some insight, as they are in the process of trying to transform the Mt. Baker Park Addition—a neighborhood platted in the early 20th century—into the Mt. Baker Historic District:

The Friends of Mt. Baker Town Center are excited to have the opportunity to document the historic, architectural and cultural background of the Mt. Baker Park Addition, with the generous support of 4Culture and our knowledgeable consultants at Northwest Vernacular Historic Preservation Consulting. Following an initial public meeting, a dedicated group of volunteers was trained to conduct field work with property profiles for over 800 homes in the Mt. Baker Park Addition. Northwest Vernacular has prepared a carefully-researched nomination of the Mount Baker Park Addition for the National Register of Historic Places that is currently under review by the State Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation. In addition to documenting the important architectural and landscape design features of the area, the project has developed rich background on the area’s cultural heritage through 1968, including the neighborhood’s important role in Seattle’s civil rights movement.

You are invited to attend the second public meeting in the historic district nomination process!

Public Meeting Number 2
Monday, October 23, 6:00 pm
Franklin High School, 3013 S Mt Baker Blvd, Seattle, WA 98144

Get an update on the important background and historic findings generated through the work and support of Northwest Vernacular and 4Culture. The Friends of Mt. Baker Town Center thanks everyone for the continuing interest and support as we document the rich historic and cultural values of a truly unique neighborhood.

The nomination process focuses on the area within the Mt. Baker Park Addition, prior to 1968. If you have specific information related to the architecture, culture, and/or history of our community up through 1968, please share it with us!

To learn more about 4Culture’s available grants and resources for historic preservation projects, visit our Preservation homepage.

New Public Art at the Factoria Recycling and Transfer Station

Al Price, Still Spinning, 2017, King County Public Art Collection. Photo by @wiseknave.

Monday, October 23, 10:00 am—12:00 pm
13800 SE 32nd St, Bellevue, WA 98005
RSVP Requested: call 206-477-4629 or email laila.mcclinton@kingcounty.gov

Continue Reading ›

Monday, October 23, 10:00 am—12:00 pm
13800 SE 32nd St, Bellevue, WA 98005
RSVP Requested: call 206-477-4629 or email laila.mcclinton@kingcounty.gov

You’re invited to join King County officials, Solid Waste Division staff, and local leaders in celebrating the grand opening of the new Factoria Recycling and Transfer Station.
The facility features innovative and sustainable green building features, expanded recycling services, and brand new public art!

We’re proud to have commissioned two new art experiences for the Factoria facility, both of which reflect King County’s forward-thinking approach to waste management. Still Spinning, created by Al Price Studio, transforms the Station’s expansive retaining wall into an art experience full of motion. The piece’s 435 stylized bicycle wheels, which are all made from 75-80% recycled materials, have been meticulously arranged—they reflect ambient light and color, shifting with weather and light conditions. Nature <-> Human, a poem etched in the Administration building’s glass entry, reflects the many cycles that take place at the transfer station. Created by Carolyn Law, Margi Berger, and Lynn Robb, its nature-focused words form shadows that travel through the lobby with the sun.

Facility tours will follow remarks from King County Executive Dow Constantine, King County Council Member Claudia Balducci, and the City of Bellevue Mayor, John Stokes. Please dress for the weather and wear sturdy closed-toe shoes.

Poetry on Buses Hits the Road: Cedar River Salmon Journey

Poetry on Buses poems on a King County Metro bus, 2016. Photo by Tim Aguero.

Sunday, October 15, 1:00—5:00 pm
Renton Library, 100 Mill Avenue S, Renton, WA 98057

Continue Reading ›

Sunday, October 15, 1:00—5:00 pm
Renton Library, 100 Mill Avenue S, Renton, WA 98057

October brings the epic return journey of our native salmon to the waters that connect us all. From the Renton Library’s bridge spanning the Cedar River, you can witness this journey and learn more about the salmon from local naturalists, then hop aboard the 60-foot poetry bus as we continue to spend the year exploring water through poetry. We’ll be hosting hourly live poetry readings, an all-ages open mic, and flash writing sessions led by Poetry on Buses Poet Planner Jourdan Imani Keith!

Visit the Seattle Aquarium online to learn more about the Cedar River Salmon Journey, and find out more about the Renton Library‘s ongoing program.

Our year of community-sourced poems, all exploring water, is underway! Read and listen to a new poem every day at poetryonbuses.org.

Guest Post: the Sammamish Heritage Society Gets Busy

Providence Heights Chapel, courtesy Sammamish Heritage Society, 2016.

Steve Thues, Outreach Manager for the Sammamish Heritage Society (SHS) recounts the victories and challenges experienced this year by this community-based, volunteer-run organization. 

Continue Reading ›

Steve Thues, Outreach Manager for the Sammamish Heritage Society (SHS) recounts the victories and challenges experienced this year by this community-based, volunteer-run organization. 

The Sammamish Heritage Society was founded in 1999 when the first major wave of development threatened the historic hundred-year-old Reard farmstead. That conflict ended in a partial victory for the SHS; the farmstead was developed but the house was saved and moved to another location where we have been restoring it with help from grants by 4Culture and other organizations. Today, with the combination of a red-hot real estate market and the restrictions of the Growth Management Act, every older home with a front yard is looked on as a good spot for a batch of town houses. This has kept us busy racing from one threatened site to the next as we try to preserve at least the history, if not the structures.

The largest site we’ve ever tried to save is the campus of the former Providence Heights Sisters Formation College: 220,000 square feet of structures on forty acres at the south end of the Sammamish Plateau. It was built in 1961 as part of an initiative by the Catholic Church to provide a college education for their nuns. The campus cost $6 million in 1960 and the buildings were finished with terrazzo floors and tiled walls, but the architectural gem is the chapel designed by a prominent local architect as a modern interpretation of Gothic style and fitted with 14 stained glass windows custom-made in France by famous glass artist Gabriel Loire.

The campus ended up in the possession of the City Church, which made plans to bulldoze the buildings to make way for development. The sudden threat was a call to action for SHS and we began a campaign to raise awareness about the campus with the goal of stopping the demolition. We set up information booths at various outdoor activities, spoke with reporters, and got stories in several local newspapers, local radio, and a video interview on the campus grounds by KING 5 News. On the political side, we testified and commented at meetings of the Issaquah City Council and the Issaquah Planning Commission. As a result of our efforts, the campus was listed as a “Most Endangered Historic Property” by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation, and our Landmark nomination for Providence Heights was accepted unanimously by the King County Landmark Commission. Our appeal of the Mitigated Determination of Non Significance and demolition permit issued by the City of Issaquah was granted and sent back to the City for additional environmental review. At the same time, the Issaquah School District has also been considering taking the property by eminent domain for two new schools, which they say would require demolition of the entire campus, and the developer has appealed the Landmark designation so things aren’t settled yet.

The Baker House, courtesy Sammamish Heritage Society, 2015.

On a smaller scale, we are trying to save a little farm house that belonged to one of the original plateau families. It was moved voluntarily by a developer to the edge of its original property. The residents of the development want to tear it down so they can use the space for a playground. Sammamish Heritage Society prepared and submitted a Landmark nomination for this property at the same King County Landmark Commission Hearing as the Providence Heights presentation. The Baker House was given a Preliminary Determination of Significance. We hope to find a way to encourage and help the residents preserve the Baker House.

During this same period, SHS members—we have about a dozen active members and we are all volunteers—have also been working on the Reard House restoration and doing a Historic Inventory of the City of Sammamish. We thank 4Culture for their support of our preservation efforts and look forward to working with them into the future.

 

Guest Post: What to Look Forward to at Short Run

The entire Short Run Micropress catalog (through 2016) featuring books printed by Paper Press Punch, Fogland Studios, Jon Horn, Strychnine Frosting, and Cold Cube Press. Photo by Eroyn Franklin.

Kelly Froh is the Executive Director of Short Run Seattle. Along with co-Director Eroyn Franklin (who also created the amazing illustrations you see all over the 4Culture website!), she is in the thick of executing the 7th annual Short Run Comix & Arts Festival

Continue Reading ›

Kelly Froh is the Executive Director of Short Run Seattle. Along with co-Director Eroyn Franklin (who also created the amazing illustrations you see all over the 4Culture website!), she is in the thick of executing the 7th annual Short Run Comix & Arts Festival

We knew a few things when we started to plan Short Run in 2011; we wanted it to be tightly curated with the best work we could find. Promotional items and signage would be handmade, as much as possible, and we would use as many print methods as we had access to. When that wasn’t enough, we started publishing our own books, having art shows, creating projects, and growing programming with partners in the community.

Upwards of 60 people can be involved in one of our books, drawing, writing, screen printing, folding, or helping to get the book further out into the world. We are especially proud of our latest anthology, Prompt, which utilizes silkscreen, Risograph, and letterpress. It’s a print pack that contains seven reprinted drawings and paintings by local artists. On the flipside of each is an original comic, poem, or prose piece written in response. This prompt-driven anthology allowed us to tap talent from the fine art, poetry, small press lit, and comic communities, and make unlikely, but oh-so-right, pairings.

Volunteer Jessica Lopez collates Red Eye, an international anthology. Photo by Kelly Froh.

When you attend our free festival at Fisher Pavilion on Saturday, November 4, please visit the Short Run table where you will find our history in the form of collaborative printed anthologies of all shapes and sizes. Next to this table, will be our partner Fogland Studios, who will be screenprinting onsite, and near us will be our local printers we’ve worked with repeatedly like Paper Press Punch, Strychnine Frosting, Cold Cube Press, and Grapheme.

Our programming partners have also helped make this year the most impressive yet. Like usual, we team up with Seattle Experimental Animation Team (SEAT) to screen animation from the regional and national stage, but this year we reached out to several collectives and organizations from outside the local sphere. We’re creating programming and sharing guests, like Kelly Sue DeConnick, Emil Ferris, and Jesús Cossio, with International Comic Arts Forum (ICAF). We’re bringing Tom Hart, the founder of Sequential Artist Workshop (SAW), to share his educational expertise with a storytelling flow workshop. Plus Zero, an international collective, will be bringing collaborative work from around the world to the gallery at The Vera Project. That’s right–we’ve grown so much we’ve taken over two venues at Seattle Center!

As our projects and ideas get bigger, so does our global community, and we get to introduce the people and groups we discover to the city we love. DIY will always be our beating heart and collaboration and sharing resources helps us grow, participate in, and make a thriving community.

We’re proud to help fund Short Run through our Sustained Support grant.

Snapshots of a Growing Cultural Infrastructure

Friends of Jimi Hendrix Park raised funds to complete and install a shelter structure in the public park adjacent to the Northwest African American Museum. The initial year of events and activities in the space is now in full swing, produced in collaboration with many partner community groups.

In 2015, we partnered with King County Executive Dow Constantine and the King County Council to make a historic $28 million investment in our region’s cultural infrastructure. The endeavor was called Building for Culture, and it paved the way—literally, in some cases—for new and improved cultural facilities of all kinds, in all corners of King County.

Continue Reading ›

In 2015, we partnered with King County Executive Dow Constantine and the King County Council to make a historic $28 million investment in our region’s cultural infrastructure. The endeavor was called Building for Culture, and it paved the way—literally, in some cases—for new and improved cultural facilities of all kinds, in all corners of King County.

Building for Culture funded things like plasterwork, HVAC repairs, sound systems, lighting, brick laying, commercial kitchen equipment, and so much more, and now we are beginning to truly see what these all add up to. The organizations who put these dollars to work have been able to grow and expand, serving more King County residents than ever.

As these projects come to fruition, we asked photographer Eduardo Calderon to document them using his exceptional perspective. He created an incredible body of work—it captures the myriad spaces that house some of our most vibrant experiences as King County residents. Here are just a few highlights from the more than 47 projects that are either complete or well underway:

The Admiral Theater was restored and modernized to remain competitive with other Seattle movie theater venues. The Admiral Theater serves the Duwamish peninsula, an increasingly diverse area of Seattle.

 

The Plaza Roberto Maestas Multi-Cultural Community Center, managed by El Centro de la Raza, is 6,000 square feet, with a kitchen, lighting, and a stage. It provides a much-needed gathering spot and venue for the arts on Beacon Hill.

 

The Northwest Railway Museum’s Railway Education Center is the third phase of the Railway History Center campus development. It incorporates a library/archives vault, classroom, vital visitor services including restrooms and admissions, and space for program staff offices.

 

The Renton Historical Society is renovating the 30-year old Renton History Museum lobby, mitigating hazardous materials, improving disabled accessibility, and bringing lobby up to code. The project will ultimately create a safer, more accessible, and more educational entrance to museum programs and exhibits.

 

The Tollgate Farmhouse exterior restoration was done with bond funding. This is the first of multiple phases, and future phases will make the historic farmhouse available for community use.

 

All photos by Eduardo Calderon, 2016.

Photographers Selected for Picturing Trails

Jenny Riffle, Running Through the Meadow, 2010, 24”x30”digital pigment print

As summer got underway, we began the search for two photographers for Picturing Trails, a project in partnership with King County Parks to comprehensively capture and interpret the Regional Trail System through fine art photography for the very first time. Now, as fall approaches, we’re excited to announce that Jenny Riffle and Melinda Hurst Frye have been selected!

Continue Reading ›

As summer got underway, we began the search for two photographers for Picturing Trails, a project in partnership with King County Parks to comprehensively capture and interpret the Regional Trail System through fine art photography for the very first time. Now, as fall approaches, we’re excited to announce that Jenny Riffle and Melinda Hurst Frye have been selected!

As a component of the Arts Master Plan for the RTS, written in 2015 by Brian Borrello, Picturing Trails represents an ongoing effort to bring the trail system to life for the public, and King County Parks brought invaluable expertise to the selection process. Regional Trails Coordinator Robert Foxworthy welcomes Riffle and Hurst Frye to the project saying that it “…extends the vision and ethos of the Arts Master Plan to enhance the public’s awareness of and relationship to the trails. Parks recognizes the value of art and image-making to the public’s experience and understanding of the trails as unique destinations on the way to destinations.”

Melinda Hurst Frye, Underneath the Strawberries, 2016, 30″ x 40″ chromogenic print

Melinda Hurst Frye is a Seattle-based artist who works within a still-life aesthetic, revealing the mystery and activity of subterranean ecosystems. Of the Picturing Trails projects, she states that her excitement “…is magnified by my background growing up in King County and traversing the trail system. As a fine art photographer, this amount of access and support is both inspiring and important to the artistic process.” Hurst Frye often uses scanners to create her multi-layered images, and she views this project as “…a beautiful opportunity to show the uses, the users, and the natural world together. I am ready to hit the trails with my bike and scanner to create images inspired by King County’s Regional Trails System. See you out there!”

Jenny Riffle also hails from Washington state and has a longstanding affinity for the RTS: “I have always found the wildness of the parks and trails in this region a wonderful experience, so close to the city streets one can get into the woods and feel as if you are far away from the din of the city.” Her Sound of Wind series captures the mystery and dreaminess of Northwest landscapes—you may have seen some of these works at Metro bus stops. She’ll bring that perspective to Picturing Trails as well, stating, “…I will be using photography to show the border between the urban and natural world and the beauty and power of nature and the relationship that humans have with it.”

Over the coming year, both photographers will spend time exploring and photographing in the trail system using their unique approaches and methods. Parks and 4Culture will work with the photographers to select a number of images to become part of the King County Portable Works Collection, a diverse collection of portable artworks that can be seen in public buildings, hospitals, and health centers throughout the region. Stay tuned to 4Culture and Parks for chances to interact with Riffle and Hurst Frye out on the trails, and for a chance to have your own photography featured in a future phase of this project!

 

New Life for Historic Properties in Skykomish

The OneMish Lodge undergoes restoration with support from 4Culture. Photo property of 4Culture.

Threatened by long neglect, two historic properties in Skykomish have been stabilized and are on a path towards reuse.

Continue Reading ›

Threatened by long neglect, two historic properties in Skykomish have been stabilized and are on a path towards reuse.

The Skykomish Theatre building was originally built as a warehouse for Maloney’s Store, but locally is more commonly known for its use as a theater from the 1930s to the late 1960s. Later, it was used primarily for storage and fell into disrepair. New owner Frank Martin has accomplished a full rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of the building. Salvaging as much original material as possible, he has transformed the interior to include five units of extended-stay lodging, with common spaces intended to foster a sense of community among those who stay there. Martin has dubbed the project OneMish Lodge, and envisions the building as a base camp for recreation and tourism.

The Skykomish Hotel undergoing restoration with support from 4Culture. Photo property of 4Culture.

The Skykomish Hotel, which was abandoned and deteriorating for many years, has also seen substantial new investment, after the Town of Skykomish acquired the building and leased it to Revive-Historic Skykomish, LLC. With support from 4Culture, Revive Historic-Skykomish replaced the roof, abated hazardous materials, and structurally stabilized the building. They are now seeking retail tenants for the first floor, and will begin restoration of the upper floors.

We offer grants and programs to support preservation work like this throughout the year. Learn more!