Survey, Landmarking and Inventory, Oh My!

Seattle Municipal Archives, Change in land use in lower Queen Anne, 1920-1953, map 2008, CC-BY-2.0
Seattle Municipal Archives, Change in land use in lower Queen Anne, 1920-1953, map 2008, CC-BY-2.0

Announcing 2015 Preservation Special Projects Awards

At their April meeting, the 4Culture Board unanimously approved $85,000 for grants that will provide funding for twelve preservation projects in King County, Washington. These projects include documenting historic bridges, roads, mid-century modern resources and other critical survey and landmarking efforts throughout the county.

The Sammamish Historical Society was awarded $8,500 to conduct a survey of the city and surround areas, the first ever, and create an inventory of pre-1941 properties. As preservationists are aware, this is an important step in understanding a community’s existing historic resources, and identifying those properties that may be eligible for landmark status. The information gathered through this survey and inventory will then be provided to the City of Sammamish to incorporate into their GIS system and related planning tools. The Society hopes this will ensure consideration of historic properties in the City’s future planning processes, and create a list of eligible landmarks. Grant funds will allow the Sammamish Historical Society to hire a historic resource consultant, but they will also be seeking volunteers to help with the survey. For more information or to follow this project online, visit the Society’s Facebook page.

Seattle Municipal Archives, Demolition on World's Fair site, 1959, Item 61209, Engineering Department Photographic Negatives (Record Series 2613-07), CC-BY-2.0
Seattle Municipal Archives, Demolition on World’s Fair site, 1959, Item 61209, Engineering Department Photographic Negatives (Record Series 2613-07), CC-BY-2.0

With their $10,000 grant, the Queen Anne Historical Society will hire a consultant to update and expanded the neighborhood’s Historic Context Statement to include both commercial and residential buildings constructed between 1963 and to 2012. The Society hopes that the expanded context statement will increase awareness of the changes in the neighborhood’s built environment since Seattle’s 1962 world’s fair, an event that transformed the neighborhood in many ways, and document those properties built during the modern period that have not yet been inventoried. The area will include the Lake Washington Ship Canal to the north, Lake Union to the east, Denny Way to the south and Elliott Ave. W. and 15th Ave. W to the west. For more information on this project and other Society activities, visit www.qahistory.org.

King County Road Services Division was awarded a $8,560 grant to inventory the roadway conditions of the Red Brick Road, a King County Landmark near Redmond, and make recommendations for future management. The road was established in 1901 as the James Mattson Road and paved with a brick surface in 1913. That original surface, of which 1.3 miles remain, is the oldest road surface in the County’s inventory. In addition to being an important farm-to-market road, the brick roadway was incorporated into the Yellowstone Trail as the first drive-able, transcontinental route (Boston to Seattle), which allowed for its placement on the National Register in 1973. The inventory will provide a detailed segment-by-segment description of the current condition of the road surface, sub-structure and associated drainage. This document would then help guide priorities for future maintenance and repair.

For a full list of projects funded through this year’s Preservation Special Projects program, visit www.4culture.org/apply/preservationprojects and click on the recipients tab. Questions about this funding program can be directed to Program Manager, Brandi Link at (206) 263-1593.