Johnson Pit #30

Robert Morris

In 1979, 4Culture—then known as the King County Arts Commission—brought together a unique team of government agencies to create a historic work of public art, designed to rehabilitate land damaged by industry.

© 1979 Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, earthwork. Photo by Spike Mafford.

Artist Robert Morris removed undergrowth from an abandoned 3.7-acre gravel pit in the Kent Valley, terraced the earth, and planted it with rye grass. By creating Johnson Pit #30, Morris returned the land to active use—nearly 40 years later, we value it as a gathering place and internationally-celebrated destination.
 
 
© 1979 Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, earthwork. Photo by Spike Mafford.
© 1979 Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, earthwork. Photo by Spike Mafford.
© 1979 Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, earthwork. Photo by Spike Mafford.
© 1979 Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, earthwork. Photo by Spike Mafford.
 
 

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Project Partners: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Endowment for the Arts, King County Department of Public Works, U.S. Bureau of Mines