Harborview Medical Center

Harborview Medical Center

Multiple Artists

Norm Maleng Building

The Norm Maleng Building at Harborview Medical Center houses operating rooms, 50 additional inpatient beds, and acute care, rehabilitation and clinic facilities. Find works from both Harborview's art collection and the King County Public Art Collection throughout the building.

© Donald Varnell, The Sky, 2009, Carved and painted cedar with inlay, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by Spike Mafford

Exterior artwork for the Norm Maleng Building by Beliz Brother is incorporated into the exterior bridge structure, while artwork by Gloria Bornstein is embedded in the sidewalk along 9th Avenue on an axis with Mt. Rainier, and seeks metaphorically to bring the mountain to the hospital environs. On each of the six floors of the building, a different artist created works at the elevator landings to visually identify each floor with art that is memorable and unique, helping patients and visitors to orient themselves within the building. The artists were chosen through an invitational process from the four-state region that Harborview serves: Washington, Alaska, Montana and Idaho. 56 wall-hung artworks with a landscape theme hang in the public corridors of the building.

Ceramic master Akio Takamori, professor in the ceramic department at the University of Washington, has created both sculptural pieces and large scale photographs for the 6th floor lobby area. Spelling out the word LOVE, four figures fill a recessed niche in the east lobby. Detail photographs of the piece greet the visitor as they step off of the west lobby elevators. Takamori's involvement with the University has a special resonance for Harborview, which is itself affiliated with the institution.

© Akio Takamori, LOVE, Ceramic, 2008, Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by Peter de Lory

Hand Dog Pull Toy is a cast bronze sculptural work in human scale by Adrian Arleo installed on the 4th floor. The textural surface of the artwork and its emotional and physical presence appeals to visitors, staff and patients. Pull Toy Dog is accessible to wheelchair patients in Rehabilitation Services and is designed to be touched. The hands that appear as a motif suggest touch and healing.

© Adrian Arleo, Hand Dog Pull Toy, 2009, Ceramic with glaze and encaustic, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by Spike Mafford

Two painted canvas-over-panel pieces by artist Anne Appleby grace the 9th floor lobby. Through subtle overlays of color meticulously applied, Appleby creates a world in rectangular luminous form. She records the changes in nature's palette in incremental tonal variations, reflecting the world around her in its infinite and particular states of change.

© Anne Appleby, Redbud, 2008, Oil and wax on canvas on panel, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo courtesy of the artist

Sara Mast created 4 large-scale encaustic and natural pigment works on paper for the 7th floor lobby. Using imagery from scientific star maps and other print media, the artist layers the imagery as she layers pigment and wax to create visual depth and meaning

© Sara Mast, Blue Galaxies, 2008, Encaustic, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by the artist

Lyric content is contrasted with the physicality of Scott Evans' mixed media assemblage works created for the 5th floor lobby. Using found objects, collage, wood, and drawn and painted surfaces in his pieces Songline-Resounding Spirit, and Emergence — One of Us/All of Us, Evans crafts elegant objects using the universal qualities of song and myth to establish associations with home, togetherness and nature, and to underscore our shared human experience. Read the artist's statement about this work.

© Scott Evans, Emergence - , 2008, Mixed media, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by Spike Mafford

Donald Varnell imbues his native carving traditions with contemporary cultural overlays as disparate as Japanese anime and Art Nouveau design. With a carved base of Western Red Cedar, the work is heavily inlaid, painted and decorated. The artwork pushes beyond the borders of tradition and is informed by Varnell's personal interests and fascinations. For the 8th floor lobby the artist created two pieces. The Sky is a large scale, embellished cedar carving with prominent face forms including sun, moon, raven, moths, wind, and a central sky face. Untitled (Tee-shirt) is an oversized cedar tee-shirt form. This humble and everyday garment forms the base for balloon-like graphics. Varnell's work embodies the First Peoples' tradition of adaptive creativity, drawing strength and inspiration from heritage traditions while embracing contemporary life and its expression.

© Donald Varnell, The Sky, 2009, Carved and painted cedar with inlay, King County Public Art Collection at Harborview Medical Center, Photo by Spike Mafford