Welcome, New Touring Arts Roster Performers!

New Touring Arts Roster performers Sundae + Mr. Goessel, photo by Rick Wait.

After celebrating its 30th birthday last year, the Touring Arts Roster—our online tool connecting performing artists of all disciplines to audiences across King County—continues to grow. Auditions were held over two days in August at Renton’s Carco Theatre, with a peer panel making selections. We’re excited to welcome these 11 new acts to the Roster:

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New Touring Arts Roster performers Sundae + Mr. Goessel, photo by Rick Wait.

After celebrating its 30th birthday last year, the Touring Arts Roster—our online tool connecting performing artists of all disciplines to audiences across King County—continues to grow. Auditions were held over two days in August at Renton’s Carco Theatre, with a peer panel making selections. We’re excited to welcome these 11 new acts to the Roster:

Alfredo Chavez
Doubled Up
Jovino Santos Neto/Paul Taub Duo
King Khazm
Marcia Arunga
Opera Ole
Roosevelt Road
Sol de Noche
Sundae + Mr. Goessl
The Sol Quartet
Trio Cubay

Get to know these artists and their work, and book one of them for your next event! Don’t forget that we offer a financial incentive for the organizations that help put these performers in front of local audiences. Funds are available for local arts agencies, chambers of commerce, downtown associations, and municipalities presenting free concerts in their communities to be reimbursed by 4Culture for 50% of Touring Arts Roster performing artist fees. If you represent one of these organizations, read through the guidelines to make sure you qualify, and start your application!

 

 

Leo Berk Selected for New Colman Dock Terminal

Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.

As King County grows, transit is growing with it—on land and on the water. Water Taxis, managed by the King County Department of Transportation Marine Division, currently depart from downtown Seattle’s Pier 50 and head to the Vashon Island Ferry Terminal and West Seattle’s Seacrest dock. In response to a 9.5% increase in ridership between 2014 and 2015 and expected continued growth, a new multimodal terminal is being designed as part of the larger Washington State Ferries Colman Dock preservation project.

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Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, Polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.
Subterranium, 2016. University of Washington Station, Sound Transit. Aluminum, polycarbonate. 44’ x 109’ x 34’. Photo by Mark Woods.

As King County grows, transit is growing with it—on land and on the water. Water Taxis, managed by the King County Department of Transportation Marine Division, currently depart from downtown Seattle’s Pier 50 and head to the Vashon Island Ferry Terminal and West Seattle’s Seacrest dock. In response to a 9.5% increase in ridership between 2014 and 2015 and expected continued growth, a new multimodal terminal is being designed as part of the larger Washington State Ferries Colman Dock preservation project.

We’re excited that public art will be an essential component of this project, and we are pleased to announce that Leo Berk has been selected to provide permanent work of art for the new Water Taxi terminal! Artwork will serve as a welcoming gateway, a visual indication that a uniquely Northwest journey and experience is about to begin, whether passengers are departing or arriving.

Leo is no stranger to creating art for transit. If you’ve travelled through the new LINK light rail station at the University of Washington, which opened in March of this year, you’ve encountered his immersive and dazzling piece, Subterranium. Over the course of the selection process, Leo discussed the transition from land to water and back again that happens when travelling on the Water Taxi, and his personal connection with that experience, sharing, “As an avid cyclist living in Seattle, one of my favorite local bike trips is to take the ferry to Vashon to ride its bucolic roads. There is an undeniably transformative feeling—a shift in psyche—when the ship leaves the terminal and is free from land. Once the ferry arrives at its destination, there is the comforting feeling of being connected to land again, with the distinct difference that the journey has refreshed and rebooted my body and mind.”

We can’t wait to see how Leo will bring this feeling to life at the King County Seattle Ferry Terminal at Colman Dock, and how travelers will get to experience it! Design is set to be completed early next year. Stay connected with us to see how the project unfolds.

Help Set the SODO Track in Motion

SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

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SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.
SODO Track artwork by Kyler Martz.

For many years, Seattle’s community of artists and advocates imagined turning the SODO busway into a vibrant street art corridor. This summer, after years of conversations with the SODO BIA, Sound Transit, and Urban ArtWorks and nearly a year since teaming up with Planning Artist Gage Hamilton, we’re finally bringing that vision to life!

We’re kicking off the project in style, and you’re invited. Head to SODO and make this exciting launch event part of your Seattle Art Fair celebrations:

Saturday, August 6, 6:00-9:00 pm
Metropolist, 2931 First Avenue South, Suite A, Seattle
A suggested $20 donation at the door includes two drink tickets (21 and over) and a special guest music performance. See street art in progress on the big screen, enjoy food trucks, find out how you can help out with this project, and more!

The first phase of painting is underway! Artists from Germany, the Netherlands, Los Angeles, Portland, and, of course, Seattle are hard at work in SODO, painting through August 10. Get to know them at sodotrack.com, and get a peek at what they’re each creating for the SODO Track on Instagram by checking out #SODOtrack.

Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.
Artist Ola Volo at work on a mural for the SODO Track. Photo by @wiseknave.

If you’d like to join the team, stay tuned to 4Culture this summer for information on a call for artists for a Muralist Roster. This list of pre-qualified artists will be used as a resource to staff projects for the SODO Track and throughout King County. We’ll be taking applications through October! The SODO Track will transform 2 miles of SODO building backs into an international arts destination over the next three summers. Artists from around the world will paint alongside the Pacific Northwest’s best, marking SODO as the creative gateway to Seattle, and making your experience of traveling through the neighborhood so exciting you won’t be able to look away.

Grade and Griffith to Create Art for Sea-Tac

As Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and the Port of Seattle Art Program work together to renovate the North Satellite Terminal and the Concourse C Transit Station, a guiding principle has been the creation of an unmistakably Northwest sense of place. You’ve likely visited both locations when traveling with Alaska Airlines—now, we are delighted to announce that new artwork by Northwest artists John Grade and Cable Griffith will greet you there in the coming years.

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As Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and the Port of Seattle Art Program work together to renovate the North Satellite Terminal and the Concourse C Transit Station, a guiding principle has been the creation of an unmistakably Northwest sense of place. You’ve likely visited both locations when traveling with Alaska Airlines—now, we are delighted to announce that new artwork by Northwest artists John Grade and Cable Griffith will greet you there in the coming years.

Grade has been selected to create art for a prominent, elevated wall in the North Satellite. It’s the first thing you’ll see as you come up the escalator from the train, and you’ll have the opportunity to explore it from many angles throughout the concourse. Griffith’s work will transform the vertical space between a set of escalators into an art experience that will evolve as you travel between the train and Concourse C above.

Grade_Middle Fork
John Grade, Middle Fork, 2015, on display at the Renwick Gallery, Washington, D.C. Image courtesy of the artist.

John Grade—who recently received national acclaim for his piece Middle Fork, featured in the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery—is no stranger to creating large-scale, awe-inspiring works. Middle Fork began with a living, 140-foot tall, old-growth hemlock tree near the middle fork of the Snoqualmie River. Rather than using digital rendering tools, Grade and his team made a partial plaster cast of the tree by hand before building the sculpture on the surface of this cast. Its many, many individual parts were touched by many volunteer hands, accumulating into the larger whole at MadArt Studio in South Lake Union. Grade’s floor-to-ceiling Wawona sculpture in the ground floor atrium at the Museum of History & Industry, invites visitors to touch and interact with the piece, looking up, down and all around. Creating an intimate, immersive experience—both for himself as the artist working with source material, and for viewers of his artwork—is central to Grade’s approach.

Cable Griffith, Two Lights in the Woods, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.
Cable Griffith, Two Lights in the Woods, 2015. Image courtesy of the artist.

Cable Griffith brings a distinctly modern and hybrid approach to representing the Northwest landscape. Often drawing on personal camping photographs, Google Earth satellite images, and early video game aesthetic, his work references a longstanding relationship to landscape – both real and imagined. Griffith says that he plans to create work that “rewards Sea-Tac visitors’ desire for discovery,” using the experience of viewing the work on an escalator to enhance the effect of the artwork. This month, make sure to experience some of Griffith’s landscapes at G. Gibson Gallery in Pioneer Square!

In September, in partnership with the Port of Seattle Art Program, Public Art 4Culture hosted the call for artists for these opportunities to create welcoming front doors to the Pacific Northwest. 182 artist applications from around the country and Canada, six finalist interviews and three panel meetings later, we look forward to seeing how John Grade and Cable Griffith will transform your Sea-Tac travelling experience!

Your Art Could Greet Travellers at Sea-Tac Airport

© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer

Whether arriving home, changing planes, or setting off on an international adventure, the Port of Seattle Art Program wants travelers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to feel a distinctly Northwest sense of place. We’re teaming up with the Port to find two artists or artist teams to help with that goal, by creating site-specific artwork for two highly visible walls in the Airport’s North Satellite Terminal renovation.

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© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer
© Katy Stone, willowcloudwavescape, 2009. King County Public Art Collection, photo by Lara Swimmer

Whether arriving home, changing planes, or setting off on an international adventure, the Port of Seattle Art Program wants travelers at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to feel a distinctly Northwest sense of place. We’re teaming up with the Port to find two artists or artist teams to help with that goal, by creating site-specific artwork for two highly visible walls in the Airport’s North Satellite Terminal renovation.

Rendering of  Concourse C Ticketing Wall (41’5”H X 152’6”W)
Rendering of Wall 2: Concourse C Ticketing Wall (41’5”H X 152’6”W)

The two walls each sit at locations that have the potential to set the tone for a traveler’s entire experience at Sea-Tac Airport.

The first wall, located between a set of escalators, runs vertically from the North Satellite Transit Station, where passenger trains run between flight gates, and up to Concourse C, visually connecting the two levels. The second wall spans an entire side of the Concourse, and its artwork will be visible to all passengers as they walk in.

What does it mean for something – or somewhere – to feel like the Northwest? To help guide the development of the terminal and its artwork, the Port of Seattle team brainstormed a collection of words that speak to the intangible qualities that make our region distinct:

Adventure, biophilic, curiosity, experience, experimentation, and exploration, frontier of possibility, innovation, risk-taking.

As you get ready to apply, we ask artists to consider these descriptors. Eventually, the selected artists will work with the Port design team to integrate their artwork into the overall building design, and create continuity within the terminal.

This opportunity is open to professional artists living in the United States and Canada. The budget for the project is $300,000 – $500,000. Please review the full Call for Artists before applying. All application materials must be submitted online by Thursday, October 1, 2015 by 5:00 pm PST. Questions? Contact Tamar Benzikry at tamar.benzikry@4culture.org or 206-263-1617.

 

 

September Opens a New Season of Shows at Gallery4Culture

© 2012, Sadie Wechsler: Eruption 2012, Inkjet print, 64”x 84”. Courtesy of the artist.

SEPTEMBER AT GALLERY4CULTURE

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© 2012, Sadie Wechsler: Eruption 2012, Inkjet print, 64”x 84”. Courtesy of the artist.
© 2012, Sadie Wechsler: Eruption 2012, Inkjet print, 64”x 84”. Courtesy of the artist.

SEPTEMBER AT GALLERY4CULTURE

Sadie Wechsler: Part I: Redo
September 3 – 24, 2015

Opening reception: First Thursday, September 3, 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Gallery4Culture kicks off the fall season with Part I: Redo by Seattle-based artist Sadie Wechsler, a body of photographs that presents an off-kilter world. Subtly deceptive setups and faintly discordant elements feed the disorienting undercurrent that is characteristic of Wechsler’s art.

Part I: Redo consists of twelve images that range from mural-sized to moderate, are printed on an adhesive material, and mounted directly to the gallery walls. Wechsler’s images are produced using several approaches: some are single photographs, others are digital collage, while still others utilize physical collages which are then rephotographed. A self-published monograph of Wechsler’s photographs titled Part I: Redo will be released in conjunction with the show.

About the Artist

Sadie Wechsler was born and raised in Seattle. She attended Bard College where she studied photography and received a Bachelor of Arts. She earned a Master of Fine Arts from Yale University School of Art in 2013. Her work has been shown across the United States and internationally, and has appeared in numerous publications.

Wechsler and Part I: Redo lead an exciting season of shows at Gallery4Culture! Join us each month for new, innovative work by these King County artists:

• Robert Twomey & Matthew Whitney: October 2015
• Alexander Mouton: November 2015
• (Closed in December)
• Michelle de la Vega: January 2016
• Darius Morrison: February 2016
• Alexander Keyes: March 2016
• Anne Drew Potter: April 2016
• Kamla Kakaria: May 2016
• Jennifer Zwick: June 2016
• Andrew Hoeppner: July 2016

Gallery4Culture is located at 101 Prefontaine Pl S, and open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m., closed in August and December. The gallery is free and open to the public. For information or to schedule a group tour call 206 263.1589.

2015 Landmarks Capital Grants

Pt. Robinson Light Station keeper’s cottage, Vashon
Pt. Robinson Light Station keeper’s cottage, Vashon
Pt. Robinson Light Station keeper’s cottage, Vashon. Photo by Terry Behal

The demand for 4Culture’s Landmarks Capital grants continues to grow. This year we received a record 45 applications, 11 of which were NEW applicants to the program, and 5 from private property owners that steward NEWLY designated landmarks.

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Pt. Robinson Light Station keeper’s cottage, Vashon. Photo by Terry Behal
Pt. Robinson Light Station keeper’s cottage, Vashon. Photo by Terry Behal

The demand for 4Culture’s Landmarks Capital grants continues to grow. This year we received a record 45 applications, 11 of which were NEW applicants to the program, and 5 from private property owners that steward NEWLY designated landmarks.

Landmarks Capital supports “bricks and mortar” projects that help renew designated local landmarks in King County, Washington. The program funds design, materials, and labor for rehabilitation projects throughout the county. What’s unique among 4Culture offerings is that applicants don’t have to be non-profit arts or heritage organizations. Any type of ownership, and any type of use are eligible to apply.

This year, 16 projects were recommended for funding, with awards ranging from $8,800 to $30,000. A full list of grantees is available under the “Recipients” tab on the program’s webpage. Some diverse project highlights include:

Fir Lodge/Alki Homestead – restoration of the 1950’s neon roof sign
Kenmore Community Club – replacement of deteriorated wood siding
Sunset Garage – restoration of the gas pump canopy and storefront
Auburn Masonic Temple – tuck-pointing of exterior brick masonry
Pt. Robinson Light Station – repairs to keepers’ cottages

Gallery4Culture features artist team Let's in their latest collaboration, SWEEP

Looking down at Sweep (detail) © 2015 Let’s, wood, paint, electronics, light and sound

Gallery4Culture welcomes Seattle-based art collaborators Andy Arkley, Courtney Barnebey and Peter Lynch, known as Let’s , in their latest project SWEEP, opening Thursday, July 2 and running through August 6. SWEEP is an immersive interactive installation of sound and light sculpture, comprised of 250 small scale light sculptures that are synchronized with sound. These combined components are assembled into one monumental scale sculpture 12 feet high by 36 feet long and 12 feet deep. Sound and light are controlled by a single control panel (with buttons or sliders) that one (or more) gallery visitor can interact with at a time.

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Looking down at Sweep (detail) © 2015 Let’s, wood, paint, electronics, light and sound
Looking down at Sweep (detail) © 2015 Let’s, wood, paint, electronics, light and sound

Gallery4Culture welcomes Seattle-based art collaborators Andy Arkley, Courtney Barnebey and Peter Lynch, known as Let’s , in their latest project SWEEP, opening Thursday, July 2 and running through August 6. SWEEP is an immersive interactive installation of sound and light sculpture, comprised of 250 small scale light sculptures that are synchronized with sound. These combined components are assembled into one monumental scale sculpture 12 feet high by 36 feet long and 12 feet deep. Sound and light are controlled by a single control panel (with buttons or sliders) that one (or more) gallery visitor can interact with at a time.

The individual sculptures are all small white wooden boxes, each projecting a single colored light. The bulb in each element has one of four colors. In addition, colored flood lights wash the entire installation. All the lights are animated and synchronized to music and sound; variations depend on how the participant interacts with the controls.

Andy Arkley, Courtney Barnebey and Peter Lynch have been collaborating together for over ten years on various musical projects, animations and art. For the last three years they have been working exclusively as the art group LET’S. Prior to SWEEP at Gallery4Culture, their most recent interactive art installations were shown at Seattle’s 2014 Bumbershoot festival to over 10,000 people. Their temporary art installation at the Seattle Art Museum drew in nearly 2000 viewers.

They are also all members of the collage/performance art band The Bran Flakes and formerly members of the experimental dub disco video band, Library Science. Both bands make extensive use of music, design, art, animation and technology to communicate their ideas. http://letspresents.com

SWEEP Opening reception: 1st Thursday, July 2, 6:00 – 8:00 pm
Closing reception: 1st Thursday, August 6, 6:00 – 8:00 pm


Open for Art of The City

SWEEP will be on view during the Art of the City Festival. Gallery4Culture will be open on Saturday, August 1 from 10 am – 6 pm. TK Art of the City is an indoor and outdoor multidisciplinary arts festival taking place on Prefontaine Pl. S. in Pioneer Square. Art of the City will feature live music, staged and impromptu performances in a range of categories, interactive sculpture and installation, live painting and making, experimental projects, as well as special exhibitions organized by independent curators and artist groups.

Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac – and Five Other Extraordinary and Endangered Historic Properties in Washington

© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

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© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979. Photo by Spike Mafford

On May 6, the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation announced its annual list of “Most Endangered Historic Properties in the State of Washington,” and the Robert Morris Earthwork in SeaTac is on that list. Created in 1979, the earthwork, also known as Johnson Pit #30, is a 4-acre land sculpture designed by American artist Robert Morris as part of a symposium entitled Earthworks: Art as Land Reclamation sponsored by the King County Arts Commission. Two projects were realized as part of the innovative symposium: the sculptural earthwork at Johnson Pit #30 in SeaTac and Herbert Bayer’s storm water management and detention system at Mill Creek Canyon in Kent. The premise of the symposium and the resulting artworks redefined the notion of public art at an early time in the development of many civic programs. King County was pursuing a new type of land-use policy through its Arts Commission and asserting that contemporary artists can and should be instrumental in envisioning solutions for some of the most pressing and important civic and environmental issues. This fundamental principle, that artists’ ideas can shape our built environment as well as our civic life and public policy decisions continues to this day.

At the time of its creation, Johnson Pit #30 looked out on a sparsely developed Kent Valley with a rich agricultural history. Its contemplative site and bucolic view has since been dramatically changed by housing and industrial developments. 4Culture is committed to the preservation and restoration of this unique artwork. The designation by the Washington Trust for Historic Preservation and an earlier recognition as part of the Cultural Landscape Foundation’s Landslide 2014 Art and the Landscape will help the efforts to secure King County landmark status and a listing on the National Register of Historic Places.

Since 1992, the independent, nonprofit Washington Trust for Historic Preservation has used its Most Endangered Historic Properties List to bring attention to over 100 threatened sites nominated by concerned citizens and organizations across the state. As part of this outreach and education program, the Washington Trust assists advocates to develop strategies and opportunities for reducing immediate threats and to find positive preservation solutions for the endangered historic properties.

The six projects featured in this year’s Most Endangered List, including the Robert Morris Earthwork, are described in short videos and linked photos posted on the Washington Trust website.

Gallery4Culture: Christopher Buening explores his Midwestern roots

© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.

Christopher Buening: Hunter<Gatherer
June 4 – 25, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, June 4, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

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© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.
© 2015 Christopher Buening, Trophies (detail). Courtesy of the artist.

Christopher Buening: Hunter<Gatherer
June 4 – 25, 2015
Opening: 1st Thursday, June 4, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Gallery4Culture
101 Prefontaine PL S
Seattle, WA 98104

Gallery4Culture is pleased to present artist Christopher Buening in Hunter<Gatherer, a compilation of mixed media installations that explore time, memory and the emergence of self-awareness. Referring to the theme that unites this body of work, Buening gleans a quote from Patti Smith’s 2010 memoir Just Kids “…Occasionally we discover in the folds of an old handkerchief a shell or insignificant stone that had once embodied our happiest afternoons.”

Christopher Buening grew up in a family whose interests were in sharp contrast to his own temperament. His father, the consummate sportsman, possessed a fervor to instill this passion in his son. In Buening’s words:

“My father is an ardent hunter. He rabidly supports the NRA and is a staunch conservative. He also collects guns, knives and hunting paraphernalia and is out shooting at least 4 times a week (hunting, target practice, sporting clays). I was taught to shoot down in the quarry near our old cabin in Wisconsin as soon as I able to hold a gun with his guidance. When I was old enough to complete Hunter’s Safety, he almost always brought me along on hunting trips and sport shooting. I have spent countless hours in the woods with him tracking deer, grouse, woodcock, etc. I just was never any good at it.”

Buening continues “I did however love the old hunting cabin on the lake in Florence County, WI. I enjoyed being in the woods for hours finding mushrooms, building forts, looking at the plants and trees, frogs and birds. But I hated shooting animals. To please my father, though, I sometimes pretended I did. I was far more interested in the more delicate aspects of life: art and music, drawing and decorating. And I liked collecting things I would find in the woods, on the lake beaches and back roads while I was up there. And I am still an obsessive collector of things I find on the ground and random bits of ephemera I come across in my daily travels. To me each rock, shell or piece of plastic represents a moment. I remember where I was or what I was thinking the moment I pocketed it.”

Hunter<Gatherer incorporates most of its elements from Buening’s compulsive accumulation of random flotsam and jetsam. In contrast, the vases, vessels and urns function as containers created to gather and hold things – feelings and ashes (mainly of the dead). But as its title suggests, the bulk of the exhibition is about hunting and those bygone days in a tiny cabin in northern Wisconsin.

About the Artist: Christopher Buening was born in Green Bay, Wisconsin in 1973. He earned a BFA in 1997 from Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design. He relocated to Seattle in 1999. Buening is a long-standing member of the Seattle artist collective SOIL and has, during the past 15 years. actively exhibited his art throughout the region. His work is represented in the Washington State, King County, and city of Seattle public art collections.

www.chrisbuening.com

Touring Arts Roster Plays Folklife

Supersones, Photo by Hugo Ludena
Supersones, Photo by Hugo Ludena
TAR Artists at 2015 Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)

4Culture’s Touring Arts Roster boasts nearly 200 talented individual artists and groups from throughout King County who present fantastic performances from almost every discipline. If you’re taking in Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend, you are bound to be seeing them. We recommend you seek them out!

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TAR Artists at Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)
TAR Artists at 2015 Folklife (photos courtesy or artists)

4Culture’s Touring Arts Roster boasts nearly 200 talented individual artists and groups from throughout King County who present fantastic performances from almost every discipline. If you’re taking in Northwest Folklife Festival this weekend, you are bound to be seeing them. We recommend you seek them out!

Here’s a schedule to map your way:

Friday 5/22
 11:10AMPaul ‘Che oke ten’ WagnerFisher Green Stage
 11:30AMMariide (w/Folklore Society Song Circle)Cornish Playhouse Courtyard
 1:00PMBonnie BirchDiscovery Zone Stage
 2:00PMPaul ‘Che oke ten’ WagnerDiscovery Zone Stage
 3:10PMLonely CoastFolklife Café
 5:00PMEva AbramFolklife Café
 7:35PMBen Hunter & Joe SeamonsTrad Stage
 7:45PMGlobal HeatXfinity Mural Amphitheatre
9:00PMSuntonio Bandanaz (featured with Julie C.)Vera Project
Saturday 5/23
11:00AMDunavaBagley Wright Theatre
11:00AMMary Sherhart (featured in Bulgarian Showcases)Bagley Wright Theater
3:05PMPickled OkraXfinity Mural Amphitheatre
3:30PMMariideTrad Stage
4:00PMTe Fare O TamatoaCornish Playhouse
4:35PMGeorge SadakEx Hall International Dance Stage
6:00PMMary Sherhart (Tazi Baba/This Grandma)SIFF Film Center
7:55PMVela Luka Croatian Dance EnsembleEx Hall International Dance Stage
Sunday 5/24
11:00AMGansango Music & DanceArmory Center Stage
11:40AMThe TarantellasFolklife Café
12:00PMChristian Swenson w/Medicine TruckIntiman “participatory” stage
12:20PMAnzanga MarimbaXfinity Mural Amphitheatre
2:35PMRougeFolklife Café
3:15PMBailadores de Bronce
Ex Hall International Dance Stage
3:40PMNorthwest Tap ConnectionCornish Playhouse
4:00PMVamoLáXfinity Mural Amphitheatre
5:00PMShow Brazil!Xfinity Mural Amphitheatre
6:00PMSmilin’ ScandinaviansArmory Stage
7:00PMHelene Erickson’s – ANAR DANAEx Hall International Dance Stage
9:00PMValse Café OrchestraFisher Pavilion
9:20PMSupersonesXfinity Mural Amphitheatre
Monday 5/25
11:00AMWHOZYAMAMAArmory Center Stage
11:00AMMaggie BennettDiscovery Zone Stage
11:45AMBrian Vogan and His Good BuddiesFountain Lawn Stage
12:00PMSound of the Northwest w/ Juan Huey-RayCornish Playhouse Courtyard
2:30PMJoy Mills BandVera Project
3:30PMJuliana & PAVAFisher Green Stage