Linda Beaumont, Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005
© Linda Beaumont , Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005, Terrazzo, marble, cast glass, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

Echoing the original 1916 layout of the lobby floor, Linda Beaumont has created a marble and terrazzo surface that is at once an historic restoration and a powerful new work honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as the County's namesake. The artist chose photographer Flip Schulke's iconic image of the March on Washington as the central focus for the floor. Beaumont says of using Schulke's photograph, "It is an image etched in many of our minds, and now it is etched into stone. Composed as a circle, it becomes a soft focus lens into our collective memories." The etched marble image is complemented by inset polychrome marble mosaic and amber glass roundels. The artist used the same glass for a clock, integrated into Cooper's mural on the east wall, and a glowing, etched glass portrait of Dr. King, another of Schulk's photographs, encouraging all those exiting the courthouse to take the ideals of Dr. King out into the community.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Linda Beaumont, Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005
© Linda Beaumont , Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005, Terrazzo, marble, cast glass, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

Echoing the original 1916 layout of the lobby floor, Linda Beaumont has created a marble and terrazzo surface that is at once an historic restoration and a powerful new work honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as the County's namesake. The artist chose photographer Flip Schulke's iconic image of the March on Washington as the central focus for the floor. Beaumont says of using Schulke's photograph, "It is an image etched in many of our minds, and now it is etched into stone. Composed as a circle, it becomes a soft focus lens into our collective memories." The etched marble image is complemented by inset polychrome marble mosaic and amber glass roundels. The artist used the same glass for a clock, integrated into Cooper's mural on the east wall, and a glowing, etched glass portrait of Dr. King, another of Schulk's photographs, encouraging all those exiting the courthouse to take the ideals of Dr. King out into the community.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Linda Beaumont, Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005
© Linda Beaumont , Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005, Terrazzo, marble, cast glass, Detail, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

Echoing the original 1916 layout of the lobby floor, Linda Beaumont has created a marble and terrazzo surface that is at once an historic restoration and a powerful new work honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as the County's namesake. The artist chose photographer Flip Schulke's iconic image of the March on Washington as the central focus for the floor. Beaumont says of using Schulke's photograph, "It is an image etched in many of our minds, and now it is etched into stone. Composed as a circle, it becomes a soft focus lens into our collective memories." The etched marble image is complemented by inset polychrome marble mosaic and amber glass roundels. The artist used the same glass for a clock, integrated into Cooper's mural on the east wall, and a glowing, etched glass portrait of Dr. King, another of Schulk's photographs, encouraging all those exiting the courthouse to take the ideals of Dr. King out into the community.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Linda Beaumont, Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005
© Linda Beaumont , Truth Crushed To The Earth Will Rise Again, 2005, Portrait of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

Echoing the original 1916 layout of the lobby floor, Linda Beaumont has created a marble and terrazzo surface that is at once an historic restoration and a powerful new work honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as the County's namesake. The artist chose photographer Flip Schulke's iconic image of the March on Washington as the central focus for the floor. Beaumont says of using Schulke's photograph, "It is an image etched in many of our minds, and now it is etched into stone. Composed as a circle, it becomes a soft focus lens into our collective memories." The etched marble image is complemented by inset polychrome marble mosaic and amber glass roundels. The artist used the same glass for a clock, integrated into Cooper's mural on the east wall, and a glowing, etched glass portrait of Dr. King, another of Schulk's photographs, encouraging all those exiting the courthouse to take the ideals of Dr. King out into the community.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Douglas Cooper, From These Hills From These Waters, 2005
© Douglas Cooper , From These Hills From These Waters, 2005, Charcoal and graphite on paper and wood panel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

The artist believes the meaning of place cannot be pinned to a single point in time, but resonates throughout everything the place has been and all it might become in the future. Sensitively integrated into the lobby architecture, Cooper's graphite and charcoal murals interlock, creating a single unified landscape in which characters and periods from throughout the region's history come to life and interact. To create the feeling of a living, physical landscape, Cooper uses exaggerated perspective angles that invite the viewer to traverse a timeless King County. Cooper was assisted by Gregoire Picher and Patricia Clark.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Douglas Cooper, From These Hills From These Waters, 2005
© Douglas Cooper , From These Hills From These Waters, 2005, Detail, Charcoal and graphite on paper and wood panel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo courtesy of the artist

The artist believes the meaning of place cannot be pinned to a single point in time, but resonates throughout everything the place has been and all it might become in the future. Sensitively integrated into the lobby architecture, Cooper's graphite and charcoal murals interlock, creating a single unified landscape in which characters and periods from throughout the region's history come to life and interact. To create the feeling of a living, physical landscape, Cooper uses exaggerated perspective angles that invite the viewer to traverse a timeless King County. Cooper was assisted by Gregoire Picher and Patricia Clark.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Douglas Cooper, From These Hills From These Waters, 2005
© Douglas Cooper , From These Hills From These Waters, 2005, Detail, Charcoal and graphite on paper and wood panel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo courtesy of the artist

The artist believes the meaning of place cannot be pinned to a single point in time, but resonates throughout everything the place has been and all it might become in the future. Sensitively integrated into the lobby architecture, Cooper's graphite and charcoal murals interlock, creating a single unified landscape in which characters and periods from throughout the region's history come to life and interact. To create the feeling of a living, physical landscape, Cooper uses exaggerated perspective angles that invite the viewer to traverse a timeless King County. Cooper was assisted by Gregoire Picher and Patricia Clark.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Douglas Cooper, From These Hills From These Waters, 2005
© Douglas Cooper , From These Hills From These Waters, 2005, Detail, Charcoal and graphite on paper and wood panel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo courtesy of the artist

The artist believes the meaning of place cannot be pinned to a single point in time, but resonates throughout everything the place has been and all it might become in the future. Sensitively integrated into the lobby architecture, Cooper's graphite and charcoal murals interlock, creating a single unified landscape in which characters and periods from throughout the region's history come to life and interact. To create the feeling of a living, physical landscape, Cooper uses exaggerated perspective angles that invite the viewer to traverse a timeless King County. Cooper was assisted by Gregoire Picher and Patricia Clark.

Download the King County Courthouse brochure.

Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010
© Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010, Light, hand painted, etched and photo laminated glass, and steel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford.

This commemorative artwork honors beloved Prosecuting Attorney Norm Maleng who served King County from 1979-2007. Standing Tall recognizes the commitment to public service to which Maleng dedicated his life, and acknowledges the service of all King County employees. Beaumont combines light and glass, image and text to create a narrative prism that serves as a silent sentry to all that enter the Courthouse.

Named for one of Maleng's favorite maxims, a phrase that invoked his courage and dedication, Standing Tall reveres the light-filled presence Norm Maleng embodied and inspired.

Watch a video about the artwork and the life it honors.

Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010
© Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010, Light, hand painted, etched and photo laminated glass, and steel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford.

This commemorative artwork honors beloved Prosecuting Attorney Norm Maleng who served King County from 1979-2007. Standing Tall recognizes the commitment to public service to which Maleng dedicated his life, and acknowledges the service of all King County employees. Beaumont combines light and glass, image and text to create a narrative prism that serves as a silent sentry to all that enter the Courthouse.

Named for one of Maleng's favorite maxims, a phrase that invoked his courage and dedication, Standing Tall reveres the light-filled presence Norm Maleng embodied and inspired.

Watch a video about the artwork and the life it honors.

Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010
© Linda Beaumont, Standing Tall, 2010, Light, hand painted, etched and photo laminated glass, and steel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford.

This commemorative artwork honors beloved Prosecuting Attorney Norm Maleng who served King County from 1979-2007. Standing Tall recognizes the commitment to public service to which Maleng dedicated his life, and acknowledges the service of all King County employees. Beaumont combines light and glass, image and text to create a narrative prism that serves as a silent sentry to all that enter the Courthouse.

Named for one of Maleng's favorite maxims, a phrase that invoked his courage and dedication, Standing Tall reveres the light-filled presence Norm Maleng embodied and inspired.

Watch a video about the artwork and the life it honors.

Collection: King County Courthouse Seattle, Washington

The renovation and earthquake retrofitting of the courthouse included restoration of the original 1916 lobby, with integrated contemporary artwork.