Julie Berger, Motion Song, 2004
© Julie Berger, Motion Song, 2004, Powdercoated steel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

Its delicate lines intersecting with the open sky, the bridge unfolds as a structural melody, reflecting the mountains, Elliott bay, freeway overpasses and the streets below. It is a personal passageway in an otherwise industrial landscape. The deep red medallions, visible from afar, are part of the language of the portals and transit below. The rhythm of arcs, planes and shapes, disappearing and reappearing as the metallic mesh dissolves in the light, creates an engaging experience for the pedestrian on the way to and from work.

Julie Berger, Motion Song, 2004
© Julie Berger, Motion Song, 2004, Powdercoated steel, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

Its delicate lines intersecting with the open sky, the bridge unfolds as a structural melody, reflecting the mountains, Elliott bay, freeway overpasses and the streets below. It is a personal passageway in an otherwise industrial landscape. The deep red medallions, visible from afar, are part of the language of the portals and transit below. The rhythm of arcs, planes and shapes, disappearing and reappearing as the metallic mesh dissolves in the light, creates an engaging experience for the pedestrian on the way to and from work.

Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006
© Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006, Plastic, Chain link fence, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

In the hands of an artist, the city's infrastructure is teeming with expressive possibilities. Christian Moeller has re-imagined a 625-foot long chain link fence as a giant canvas of urban pixels. For News Readers, the artist used over 50,000 snap-on plastic discs to create bit-map portraits of four citizens frozen in their reaction to the news. As the viewer passes through the landscape, the fluid, pixilated images, the bus yard and the city beyond alternately fade in and out of focus. The effect is a transformative experience. While technology moves us increasingly online, News Readers serves as a witty and surprisingly tactile translation of digital imaging technology. Math-o-rama assignment: calculate the resolution of News Readers in pixels per yard.

Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006
© Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006, Plastic, Chain link fence, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

In the hands of an artist, the city's infrastructure is teeming with expressive possibilities. Christian Moeller has re-imagined a 625-foot long chain link fence as a giant canvas of urban pixels. For News Readers, the artist used over 50,000 snap-on plastic discs to create bit-map portraits of four citizens frozen in their reaction to the news. As the viewer passes through the landscape, the fluid, pixilated images, the bus yard and the city beyond alternately fade in and out of focus. The effect is a transformative experience. While technology moves us increasingly online, News Readers serves as a witty and surprisingly tactile translation of digital imaging technology. Math-o-rama assignment: calculate the resolution of News Readers in pixels per yard.

Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006
© Christian Moeller, News Readers, 2006, Plastic, Chain link fence, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

In the hands of an artist, the city's infrastructure is teeming with expressive possibilities. Christian Moeller has re-imagined a 625-foot long chain link fence as a giant canvas of urban pixels. For News Readers, the artist used over 50,000 snap-on plastic discs to create bit-map portraits of four citizens frozen in their reaction to the news. As the viewer passes through the landscape, the fluid, pixilated images, the bus yard and the city beyond alternately fade in and out of focus. The effect is a transformative experience. While technology moves us increasingly online, News Readers serves as a witty and surprisingly tactile translation of digital imaging technology. Math-o-rama assignment: calculate the resolution of News Readers in pixels per yard.

Norie Sato, 'Round and 'Round, 2011
© Norie Sato, 'Round and 'Round, 2011, Terrazzo, stainless steel, aluminum, brass, and LED lighting, Photo by Spike Mafford

Norie Sato's artwork embraces the interconnection of the Atlantic and Central bases within the operations building. She creates a successful link to the Metro aesthetic and highlights the intersection between interior and exterior, public and private.

In 'Round and 'Round, two intertwining labyrinths serve as a focal point of the facility's terrazzo floor. Each base is represented by a color, one by blue, the other by green and this differentiation is evidenced throughout the 7,200 square foot design. Medallions and circular aluminum and brass strips are imbedded for added visual interest.

These colors, forms, and materials extend outward to sculptural elements protruding through the lattice work of the green screen on the building's exterior. One side of the main entry door uses aluminum half spheres and blue LEDs, and the other side uses brass half spheres and green LEDs.

Norie Sato, 'Round and 'Round, 2011
© Norie Sato, 'Round and 'Round, 2011, Terrazzo, stainless steel, aluminum, brass, and LED lighting, Photo by Spike Mafford

Norie Sato's artwork embraces the interconnection of the Atlantic and Central bases within the operations building. She creates a successful link to the Metro aesthetic and highlights the intersection between interior and exterior, public and private.

In 'Round and 'Round, two intertwining labyrinths serve as a focal point of the facility's terrazzo floor. Each base is represented by a color, one by blue, the other by green and this differentiation is evidenced throughout the 7,200 square foot design. Medallions and circular aluminum and brass strips are imbedded for added visual interest.

These colors, forms, and materials extend outward to sculptural elements protruding through the lattice work of the green screen on the building's exterior. One side of the main entry door uses aluminum half spheres and blue LEDs, and the other side uses brass half spheres and green LEDs.

Susan Zoccola, Bloom, 2004
©┬áSusan Zoccola, Bloom, 2004, Concrete, aluminum, fiberglass, steel, light, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

The spiral imagery in this complex wall piece is inspired by the Fibonacci series, a mathematical sequence that occurs in nature. The intricacies of the growth of flowers and pinecones are overlaid on the rigid grid of the Golden Mean, a design theory from ancient Greece. What occurs in this combination is a delightful, swirling mix of light and color, organic curves and cast concrete forms, playful red domes and structural shear walls. Located beneath a looping highway overpass, the colorful design creates a welcome respite from the surrounding industrial district.

Susan Zoccola, Bloom, 2004
©┬áSusan Zoccola, Bloom, 2004, Concrete, aluminum, fiberglass, steel, light, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by YaM Studio

The spiral imagery in this complex wall piece is inspired by the Fibonacci series, a mathematical sequence that occurs in nature. The intricacies of the growth of flowers and pinecones are overlaid on the rigid grid of the Golden Mean, a design theory from ancient Greece. What occurs in this combination is a delightful, swirling mix of light and color, organic curves and cast concrete forms, playful red domes and structural shear walls. Located beneath a looping highway overpass, the colorful design creates a welcome respite from the surrounding industrial district.

Collection: Atlantic/Central Base Seattle, Washington

Integrated artwork for Metro Transit's service hub activates the street and parking structure at this busy crossroads south of downtown Seattle.