Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979, Earth, grass, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

In 1979 Robert Morris was selected to design an earthwork in conjunction with the symposium, "Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture." The purpose of the symposium was to create new tools to rehabilitate land abused by technology and to provide artists with design opportunities for surplus King County property in gravel pits, surface mines and landfill sites.

Morris was selected to work on a 3.7-acre site, a sand and gravel pit abandoned in the 1940s. "The work consists of a series of descending concentric slopes and benches located at the top of the site. A hill-form rises on the lower third of the site," describes Morris. Cleared of all of the undergrowth and trees, the land was terraced and then planted with rye grass. The creation of this artwork returned the land to active use. Visitors today find the open space a welcoming and contemplative area—a park-like setting that gently reminds viewers of the site’s former industrial roots. It remains one of King County’s most important works.

Visit the website for the City of Kent’s Mill Creek Canyon Earthworks by Herbert Bayers, recently awarded Historic Landmark status. These two important earthworks were created during the same era and are near to one another.

ADDRESS
21610 - 37th Place South, SeaTac, Washington

PARTNERS
King County Public Works Department, Buckeye Trust, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of Interior, National Endowment for the Arts

Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979, Earth, grass, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

In 1979 Robert Morris was selected to design an earthwork in conjunction with the symposium, "Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture." The purpose of the symposium was to create new tools to rehabilitate land abused by technology and to provide artists with design opportunities for surplus King County property in gravel pits, surface mines and landfill sites.

Morris was selected to work on a 3.7-acre site, a sand and gravel pit abandoned in the 1940s. "The work consists of a series of descending concentric slopes and benches located at the top of the site. A hill-form rises on the lower third of the site," describes Morris. Cleared of all of the undergrowth and trees, the land was terraced and then planted with rye grass. The creation of this artwork returned the land to active use. Visitors today find the open space a welcoming and contemplative area—a park-like setting that gently reminds viewers of the site’s former industrial roots. It remains one of King County’s most important works.

Visit the website for the City of Kent’s Mill Creek Canyon Earthworks by Herbert Bayers, recently awarded Historic Landmark status. These two important earthworks were created during the same era and are near to one another.

ADDRESS
21610 - 37th Place South, SeaTac, Washington

PARTNERS
King County Public Works Department, Buckeye Trust, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of Interior, National Endowment for the Arts

Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979, Earth, grass, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

In 1979 Robert Morris was selected to design an earthwork in conjunction with the symposium, "Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture." The purpose of the symposium was to create new tools to rehabilitate land abused by technology and to provide artists with design opportunities for surplus King County property in gravel pits, surface mines and landfill sites.

Morris was selected to work on a 3.7-acre site, a sand and gravel pit abandoned in the 1940s. "The work consists of a series of descending concentric slopes and benches located at the top of the site. A hill-form rises on the lower third of the site," describes Morris. Cleared of all of the undergrowth and trees, the land was terraced and then planted with rye grass. The creation of this artwork returned the land to active use. Visitors today find the open space a welcoming and contemplative area—a park-like setting that gently reminds viewers of the site’s former industrial roots. It remains one of King County’s most important works.

Visit the website for the City of Kent’s Mill Creek Canyon Earthworks by Herbert Bayers, recently awarded Historic Landmark status. These two important earthworks were created during the same era and are near to one another.

ADDRESS
21610 - 37th Place South, SeaTac, Washington

PARTNERS
King County Public Works Department, Buckeye Trust, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of Interior, National Endowment for the Arts

Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979
© Robert Morris, Johnson Pit #30, 1979, Earth, grass, Goat used in maintenance, King County Public Art Collection, Photo by Spike Mafford

In 1979 Robert Morris was selected to design an earthwork in conjunction with the symposium, "Earthworks: Land Reclamation as Sculpture." The purpose of the symposium was to create new tools to rehabilitate land abused by technology and to provide artists with design opportunities for surplus King County property in gravel pits, surface mines and landfill sites.

Morris was selected to work on a 3.7-acre site, a sand and gravel pit abandoned in the 1940s. "The work consists of a series of descending concentric slopes and benches located at the top of the site. A hill-form rises on the lower third of the site," describes Morris. Cleared of all of the undergrowth and trees, the land was terraced and then planted with rye grass. The creation of this artwork returned the land to active use. Visitors today find the open space a welcoming and contemplative area—a park-like setting that gently reminds viewers of the site’s former industrial roots. It remains one of King County’s most important works.

Visit the website for the City of Kent’s Mill Creek Canyon Earthworks by Herbert Bayers, recently awarded Historic Landmark status. These two important earthworks were created during the same era and are near to one another.

ADDRESS
21610 - 37th Place South, SeaTac, Washington

PARTNERS
King County Public Works Department, Buckeye Trust, Bureau of Mines, United States Department of Interior, National Endowment for the Arts

Collection: Robert Morris Earthwork SeaTac, Washington

An early land reclamation project, an artistic intervention, and one of a very few still-existing earthworks from its era, Johnson Pit #30 is unique in the Collection.